X-ray lithography

X-ray lithography, is a process used in electronic industry to selectively remove parts of a thin film. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to X-ray lithography

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2021 IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Magnetic Conference (INTERMAG)

INTERMAG is the premier conference on all aspects of applied magnetism and provides a range of oral and poster presentations, invited talks and symposia, a tutorial session, and exhibits reviewing the latest developments in magnetism.


2019 44th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz)

Science, technology and applications spanning the millimeter-waves, terahertz and infrared spectral regions


2019 20th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems & Eurosensors XXXIII (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXXIII)

The world's premiere conference in MEMS sensors, actuators and integrated micro and nano systems welcomes you to attend this four-day event showcasing major technological, scientific and commercial breakthroughs in mechanical, optical, chemical and biological devices and systems using micro and nanotechnology.The major areas of activity in the development of Transducers solicited and expected at this conference include but are not limited to: Bio, Medical, Chemical, and Micro Total Analysis Systems Fabrication and Packaging Mechanical and Physical Sensors Materials and Characterization Design, Simulation and Theory Actuators Optical MEMS RF MEMS Nanotechnology Energy and Power



Periodicals related to X-ray lithography

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Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Methods, algorithms, and human-machine interfaces for physical and logical design, including: planning, synthesis, partitioning, modeling, simulation, layout, verification, testing, and documentation of integrated-circuit and systems designs of all complexities. Practical applications of aids resulting in producible analog, digital, optical, or microwave integrated circuits are emphasized.


Electron Device Letters, IEEE

Publishes original and significant contributions relating to the theory, design, performance and reliability of electron devices, including optoelectronic devices, nanoscale devices, solid-state devices, integrated electronic devices, energy sources, power devices, displays, sensors, electro-mechanical devices, quantum devices and electron tubes.


Electron Devices, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes original and significant contributions relating to the theory, design, performance and reliability of electron devices, including optoelectronics devices, nanoscale devices, solid-state devices, integrated electronic devices, energy sources, power devices, displays, sensors, electro-mechanical devices, quantum devices and electron tubes.


Electronics Packaging Manufacturing, IEEE Transactions on

Design for manufacturability, cost and process modeling, process control and automation, factory analysis and improvement, information systems, statistical methods, environmentally-friendly processing, and computer-integrated manufacturing for the production of electronic assemblies, products, and systems.



Most published Xplore authors for X-ray lithography

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Xplore Articles related to X-ray lithography

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Capability of 70 nm pattern replication in x-ray lithography

Digest of Papers Microprocesses and Nanotechnology 2000. 2000 International Microprocesses and Nanotechnology Conference (IEEE Cat. No.00EX387), 2000

It has been shown that the Proximity X-ray Lithography (PXL) is the most mature technology among Next Generation Lithography (NGL) options at 100 nm node. As the basic resolution of PXL is defined by the Fresnel diffraction, sub-100 nm patterns are resolved if only the Mask-to-Wafer gap is set properly. Resolution of 65 nm L/S patterns with a gap of ...


Polarity effect on the behavior of gas puff z-pinch plasma produced by IPP system

IEEE Conference Record - Abstracts. PPPS-2001 Pulsed Power Plasma Science 2001. 28th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science and 13th IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference (Cat. No.01CH37, 2001

Summary form only given, as follows. Hot spots produced by gas-puff z-pinch plasma which are high energy density plasma regions radiate intensive soft X-rays. A gas-puff z-pinch is expected in industrial applications such as soft X-ray lithography, microscopy and lasers. In these cases, the scattering of hot spots is important when the gas-puff z-pinch plasma is used as a point ...


Progress report on the spherical pinch and the vacuum spark EUV/X-ray radiation sources

25th Anniversary, IEEE Conference Record - Abstracts. 1998 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (Cat. No.98CH36221), 1998

Summary form only given. The field of EUV/X-ray lithography sources is an evolving one in which the technologies competing to complement the multiple beam synchrotrons as radiation sources are mainly plasma based. There are several of these plasma technologies: laser-produced plasmas, dense plasma focus, Z-pinch, X-pinch, vacuum spark, spherical pinch, etc. The radiation wavelength to be used in microlithography can ...


Rotational Manipulation of Trapped Micro-Objects About Their Axes Perpendicular to Tbe Laser Beam Axis by Radiation Pressure

Proceedings of European Meeting on Lasers and Electro-Optics, 1996

None


Sub-0.1 μm NMOS transistors fabricated using laser-plasma point-source X-ray lithography

IEEE Electron Device Letters, 1995

We report the experimental results of the first MOSFET's ever fabricated using a laser plasma-source X-ray stepper. The minimum gate length of these transistors is 0.12 μm with an effective channel length of 0.075 μm. These transistors were patterned using a mix-and-match lithography scheme where the gate level was printed using a 1.4 nm plasma-source X-ray stepper while the other ...



Educational Resources on X-ray lithography

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Capability of 70 nm pattern replication in x-ray lithography

    It has been shown that the Proximity X-ray Lithography (PXL) is the most mature technology among Next Generation Lithography (NGL) options at 100 nm node. As the basic resolution of PXL is defined by the Fresnel diffraction, sub-100 nm patterns are resolved if only the Mask-to-Wafer gap is set properly. Resolution of 65 nm L/S patterns with a gap of 10 /spl mu/m was demonstrated. Recently, the limit of optical lithography is expected to extend to deep sub-100 nm using the F/sub 2/ laser lithography. However the advantage of PXL to F/sub 2/ at 70 nm node was shown in calculation. In this study some experimental results for 70-nm node pattern replication are shown and discussed.

  • Polarity effect on the behavior of gas puff z-pinch plasma produced by IPP system

    Summary form only given, as follows. Hot spots produced by gas-puff z-pinch plasma which are high energy density plasma regions radiate intensive soft X-rays. A gas-puff z-pinch is expected in industrial applications such as soft X-ray lithography, microscopy and lasers. In these cases, the scattering of hot spots is important when the gas-puff z-pinch plasma is used as a point source of soft X-rays. Previous results in our study showed the reduction of radial displacement of hot spots in positive voltage shots by using a IPP (inductive pulsed power) system. In the paper, the voltage polarities effect on the z-pinch plasma behavior, soft X-ray emission and spatial distribution of hot spots are described.

  • Progress report on the spherical pinch and the vacuum spark EUV/X-ray radiation sources

    Summary form only given. The field of EUV/X-ray lithography sources is an evolving one in which the technologies competing to complement the multiple beam synchrotrons as radiation sources are mainly plasma based. There are several of these plasma technologies: laser-produced plasmas, dense plasma focus, Z-pinch, X-pinch, vacuum spark, spherical pinch, etc. The radiation wavelength to be used in microlithography can either be in the EUV or soft X-ray regions. In both cases, the plasma sources are well positioned to complement the synchrotron because of their granularity and flexibility to adapt to various work environments. For a number of years now the company Advanced Laser and Fusion Technology, Inc. (ALFT) has chosen two plasma technologies for development as point sources of radiation for microlithography. They are the vacuum spark technology, and the spherical pinch technology. Both have a long history of previous research to support the contention that they are well qualified to be converted into technological tools for the manufacturing of next generation of chips. The vacuum spark is essentially a miniature discharge capable of emitting EUV/soft X-ray radiation. Because the radiation is emitted in small dose in each spark, it is necessary to repeat the phenomenon at high repetition frequency, of the order of several kilohertz, in order to meet the requirements of microlithography. Quite to the contrary, the spherical pinch is a high dose plasma radiation source for each discharge, and the repetition frequency can be contained within one hertz or so.

  • Rotational Manipulation of Trapped Micro-Objects About Their Axes Perpendicular to Tbe Laser Beam Axis by Radiation Pressure

    None

  • Sub-0.1 μm NMOS transistors fabricated using laser-plasma point-source X-ray lithography

    We report the experimental results of the first MOSFET's ever fabricated using a laser plasma-source X-ray stepper. The minimum gate length of these transistors is 0.12 μm with an effective channel length of 0.075 μm. These transistors were patterned using a mix-and-match lithography scheme where the gate level was printed using a 1.4 nm plasma-source X-ray stepper while the other layers were patterned using optical lithography.

  • Z-pinch plasma radiation source for X-ray lithography

    Progress in the production of integrated circuits which are the main component of different microelectronic devices in many respects depends on advances in lithography. A critical parameter that determines performance of microelectronic devices is a minimum feature size of an integrated circuit. At present lithography uses krypton-fluorine lasers with the 248-nm wavelength as a radiation source. It allows achieving minimum feature size of 180 nm. Further reduction is limited by lack of lasers with shorter wavelength and optically transparent materials. For the spectral range 3-30 nm, multilayer mirrors are now available, which can be used in lithography to produce elements with minimum feature size determined by wavelength of a radiation source in this spectral range. A plasma radiation source based on a gas-puff Z-pinch is suitable for such application. Nowadays there are installations of different energy scale, which are able to produce from 0.5 J to 3-4 MJ in single discharge regime and 0.02 J/pulse in repetitive regime (150 Hz) in the spectral range of 0.1-30 nm. Our gas-puff Z-pinch installation IMRI-3 (250 kA) provides radiation yield up to 200 J in the spectral range 3-30 nm. A new repetitive installation was designed with IMRI-3 as a prototype. The use of different working gases allows optimization of radiation yield for a certain spectral line in the operation spectral range of multilayer mirrors.

  • KeV X-ray generation from picosecond KrF laser-produced plasmas

    Summary form only given. The emission of X-rays in the photon energy range of 800-1400 eV from plasmas produced on solid targets by 0.85, 2, and 90 picosecond KrF laser pulses has been studied experimentally. One of the goals of this study was to optimize such a source of KeV X-rays for X-ray lithography. The pulse energies ranged from 1 to 50 mJ, which are typically the energies which can be extracted in a single short pulse from a commerical KrF discharge laser. The targets used ranged from iron to zinc in order to obtain emission from the neon-like ionization states in the keV energy range. In addition, titanium and tin targets were measured in order to study the scaling to lower and higher atomic number elements. The emission spectra, angular distribution, and X-ray conversion efficiencies into 2 /spl pi/ Srad have been measured in vacuum. Peak conversion efficiencies of laser light into keV X-ray emission of 10-13% were obtained for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn targets for 90 ps, 50 mJ pulses.

  • Proximity X-Ray Lithography Using a Droplet-Target Laser-Plasma Source

    None

  • Image formation by continuous writing with multi-beam in X-ray nanolithography

    Difficulties in X-ray lithography are now condensed into mask related matters. Since the exposure mode is basically 1:1, more strict accuracy is requested for mask fabrication than for the final images. Mask fabrication technology has made remarkable progress, and image formation of 70 nm line width was reported recently (Miyatake et al, 2001). Meanwhile, pattern reduction necessitates narrowing gaps between mask and wafer, since the gaps decrease in proportion to the square of the line width. If we want to form 25-35 nm two- dimensional patterns in future, mask-wafer gaps of 2-4 μm are needed; it is impractical. Therefore, around 50-70 nm image forming has been considered as the limits of X-ray lithography. Recently, three types of X-ray mask were proposed which enable 25-35 nm image formation while keeping a practical proximity gap >8 μm. The first is enlarged pattern masks (EPMs), applying a line-narrowing effect by edge diffraction. The second is interference slit masks (ISMs), which form design images by interference effect from the slits of the mask. The third is focusing x-ray masks (FXMs), which form an array of concave lenses using the absorbing materials on the mask membrane. These masks, which reduce mask patterns partially (PRMs: partially reducing masks), relieve the limitation of the proximity gaps. In this article, we discuss the design of the masks, beamlines and procedures of writing for 25 nm image formations.

  • Optimum phase condition for low-contrast X-ray masks

    In proximity X-ray lithography (PXL), the use of a low-contrast mask strongly improves the resolution. Since a low-contrast mask works as an attenuating phase-shift mask, interference of the X-rays passed through the clear and opaque areas enhances the image contrast. Although previous works showed that the optimum phase shift angle of the X-ray absorber is much smaller than /spl pi/ in PXL, the optimum phase condition has not been clarified yet. In this article, we show the geometric phase shift caused by different optical path lengths plays an important role in image formation. By considering the geometric phase shift along with the absorber phase shift, the phase effect can be clearly understood.



Standards related to X-ray lithography

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No standards are currently tagged "X-ray lithography"