Whole body imaging

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Whole body imaging (WBI) refers to the internal display of the entire body in a single procedure. It may refer to one of two types of body imaging technologies used for security screening such as in airports: Millimeter wave scanner Backscatter X-ray In medical imaging, it may also refer to full-body CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Whole body imaging

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2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


2020 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2019 IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and severalco-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides anexceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2018 IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2017 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conferenceand 27co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides anexceptional value for students,academics and industry.

  • 2016 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry.

  • 2015 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    computer, vision, pattern, cvpr, machine, learning

  • 2014 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. Main conference plus 50 workshop only attendees and approximately 50 exhibitors and volunteers.

  • 2013 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry.

  • 2012 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Topics of interest include all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition including motion and tracking,stereo, object recognition, object detection, color detection plus many more

  • 2011 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Sensors Early and Biologically-Biologically-inspired Vision, Color and Texture, Segmentation and Grouping, Computational Photography and Video

  • 2010 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Concerned with all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition. Issues of interest include pattern, analysis, image, and video libraries, vision and graphics, motion analysis and physics-based vision.

  • 2009 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Concerned with all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition. Issues of interest include pattern, analysis, image, and video libraries, vision and graphics,motion analysis and physics-based vision.

  • 2008 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2007 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2006 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2005 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

The International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) is the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s biggest conference and one of the leading international forums for robotics researchers to present their work.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


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Periodicals related to Whole body imaging

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


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Xplore Articles related to Whole body imaging

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Effect of geometrical constraints on PET performance in whole body simultaneous PET-MR

2009 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS/MIC), 2009

Simultaneous PET-MR scanners are being developed for whole body imaging. These systems require compact and MR compatible readout for the PET component. Another important modification is the geometry of the PET scanner which is determined by space constraints imposed by the surrounding MR scanner. The maximal radius of the PET scanner is limited and it becomes difficult to insert end ...


Characterization of a whole body imaging technique for PET

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 1990

An investigation of rapid whole-body PET (positron emission tomography) scanning was performed with a view towards its eventual use in screening for metastatic lesions with /sup 18/F-fluoride ion or /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Longitudinal images of the body were formed using three techniques. Simple 2-D projection images were formed by resorting the sinogram data. The images were created for a set of ...


Performance measurements of a pixelated NaI(Tl) PET scanner

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 2003

A prototype positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for whole body imaging with 4 mm /spl times/ 4 mm /spl times/ 30 mm NaI(Tl) crystals and Anger-logic readout has been built and tested. The scanner is composed of 36,540 NaI(Tl) pixels which are coupled to an optically continuous lightguide and a hexagonal closed packed array of 39 mm photomultiplier tubes. The ...


Performance measurements of a pixelated NaI(Tl) PET scanner

2002 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record, 2002

A prototype PET scanner for whole body imaging with 4 mm /spl times/ 4 mm /spl times/ 30 mm NaI(Tl) crystals and Anger-logic readout has been built and tested. The scanner is composed of 36,540 NaI(Tl) pixels which are coupled to an optically continuous lightguide and a hexagonal closed packed array of 39 mm photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The scanner is ...


Self normalization for continuous 3D whole body emission data in 3D PET

IEEE Symposium Conference Record Nuclear Science 2004., 2004

Continuous 3D scanning with a large-aperture PET scanner can provide high sensitivity over most of the axial FOV in whole-body studies. To minimum the artifact depended on the uniformity of the different lines-of-response (LORs) in sinograms, accurate normalizing algorithms will be needed. In this study, we propose self-normalization method in which full correction factors are derived from the emission data ...


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Educational Resources on Whole body imaging

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Effect of geometrical constraints on PET performance in whole body simultaneous PET-MR

    Simultaneous PET-MR scanners are being developed for whole body imaging. These systems require compact and MR compatible readout for the PET component. Another important modification is the geometry of the PET scanner which is determined by space constraints imposed by the surrounding MR scanner. The maximal radius of the PET scanner is limited and it becomes difficult to insert end shielding. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of modified geometry and reduced shielding on the PET performance with regards to spatial resolution, singles, trues, scatter and random coincidences. Materials and methods: All data were simulated using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation tool. The reference system for the simulation was a state of the art PET-CT scanner (Gemini TF scanner with LYSO crystals Philips Medical systems). This system has a diameter of 90 cm and end shields with an inner diameter of 70 cm. The energy resolution of the system is 12 % and based on this system a whole body PET scanner was designed with less modules positioned at a smaller radius. This modification enables it to fit inside a 3T MR scanner. This system was simulated without end shielding and with limited end shielding (60 cm diameter). For the three systems the trues, random and scatter were simulated to quantify the effect of the modified geometry. The object used was the 70 cm long NEMA scatter phantom containing activity in a line source at a radial distance of 4.5 cm. Results: Reducing the diameter from 90 cm to 70 cm results in an increase of the amount of trues by 28 %. The relative scatter fraction increases from 33 % to 36 % for the 70 cm diameter system without end shields. The introduction of short shields resulted in a small reduction (2 %) of scattered and random coincidence fraction. More detailed analysis about origin of the events showed that in the new design 85 % of scattered events originates from inside the FOV, while 90 % of the random coincidences is caused by outside FOV activity. Conclusions: For PET systems with good energy resolution, end shields only play a limited role in the reduction of scatter. The end shields are only blocking a limited part of the scattered outside FOV activity and are mostly effective in reducing the singles and resulting randoms from outside FOV.

  • Characterization of a whole body imaging technique for PET

    An investigation of rapid whole-body PET (positron emission tomography) scanning was performed with a view towards its eventual use in screening for metastatic lesions with /sup 18/F-fluoride ion or /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Longitudinal images of the body were formed using three techniques. Simple 2-D projection images were formed by resorting the sinogram data. The images were created for a set of angles covering a full 180 degrees to facilitate viewing in a cine format. The effects of summing over a number of angles per view and filtering to reduce noise were investigated. Limited-angle backprojection images were formed using a small range of angles and no reconstruction filter. The resulting volume was then sliced coronally to give planar images as a function of depth. Coronal images were also obtained after reconstruction with a standard filtered backprojection technique, but with no attenuation correction. All three processes provided surprisingly good images of diagnostic quality, which were obtainable in practical scan times.<<ETX>>

  • Performance measurements of a pixelated NaI(Tl) PET scanner

    A prototype positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for whole body imaging with 4 mm /spl times/ 4 mm /spl times/ 30 mm NaI(Tl) crystals and Anger-logic readout has been built and tested. The scanner is composed of 36,540 NaI(Tl) pixels which are coupled to an optically continuous lightguide and a hexagonal closed packed array of 39 mm photomultiplier tubes. The scanner is designed with a crystal-to-crystal diameter of 89 cm and an axial field of view (AFOV) of 25 cm. The main goals of this study are: 1) to overcome the count-rate limitation of the continuous NaI(Tl) scanner (C-PET); 2) to improve the spatial resolution and image contrast by using small pixels; and 3) to eliminate the relatively large data gaps between the detectors in the continuous NaI(Tl) scanner. The use of pixelated crystals allows the light spread to be controlled by the proper lightguide design, thereby reducing the spreading of the light relative to a continuous crystal. A two-dimensional position histogram obtained using the pixelated NaI(Tl) scanner shows very good crystal discrimination due to the high light output of NaI(Tl).

  • Performance measurements of a pixelated NaI(Tl) PET scanner

    A prototype PET scanner for whole body imaging with 4 mm /spl times/ 4 mm /spl times/ 30 mm NaI(Tl) crystals and Anger-logic readout has been built and tested. The scanner is composed of 36,540 NaI(Tl) pixels which are coupled to an optically continuous lightguide and a hexagonal closed packed array of 39 mm photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The scanner is designed with a crystal-to- crystal diameter of 89 cm and an axial field of view (AFOV) of 25 cm. The main goals of this study are (1) to overcome the count-rate limitation of the continuous NaI(Tl) scanner (CPET), (2) to improve the spatial resolution and image contrast by using small pixels, and (3) to eliminate the relatively large data gaps between the detectors in the continuous NaI(Tl) scanner.

  • Self normalization for continuous 3D whole body emission data in 3D PET

    Continuous 3D scanning with a large-aperture PET scanner can provide high sensitivity over most of the axial FOV in whole-body studies. To minimum the artifact depended on the uniformity of the different lines-of-response (LORs) in sinograms, accurate normalizing algorithms will be needed. In this study, we propose self-normalization method in which full correction factors are derived from the emission data itself without using conventional normalize scan of cylinder phantom. In this method, transaxial block profile and crystal efficiency were calculated from the original emission data, and correction factors applied itself. We implemented proposed method to a 5 ring GSO PET scanner which has continuous 3D scan mode and evaluated. To accurate correction factor, components were calculated from dataset which summed in the direction of the bed movement. To investigate the performance, we compared the proposed method with conventional component based normalization using uniform cylinder phantom. And To evaluate clinical performance, we also /sup 18/FDG human studies were performed. In both phantom and human studies, the block profile and crystal efficiencies can be calculated correctly using proposed method. Evaluating percent standard deviation, self-normalization improved transaxial uniformity since it reduced ring artifacts. Especially, the accuracy of transaxial block profiles which influenced easily by some physical phenomena has unproved. Our self-normalize method was accurate enough for continuous 3D scanning with a large aperture PET scanner. The image quality using self-normalization was superior than conventional component normalization. This method contributes to the improvement of system operation , since regular acquisition of cylinder phantom for normalization is not necessary.

  • Requirements for accurate anatomical imaging of the rat for electromagnetic modeling

    Modeling electromagnetic energy distribution in laboratory test animals, such as the rat, requires accurate imaging of the animal's anatomy. Accuracy, in this sense, refers to the proper positioning and shape of the various organs of the animal as they are situated in the laboratory setting. A number of factors related to the accuracy of bioelectromagnetic studies dictate the required animal positioning. The authors performed whole body imaging of Sprague-Dawley rats in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. By necessity the rats were anesthetized during imaging and a whole body thermoplastic cast was made to support the organs in the same position as they were in an awake rat. Comparisons were made to unsupported anesthetized rats and dead rats. It is concluded that it is necessary for rats to be supported in a whole-body cast to best simulate the anatomy of the awake rat. In addition, the authors note changes in abdominal structures due to death that necessitate the analysis of the animal while it is still alive.

  • Whole body imaging with dynamic volume 320-row CT

    State of the art of CT technology will be presented. It has a z-coverage of 16cm to cover most of the organs in one single, non-helical, rotation. Whole body imaging using different scan methods will be presented, and a comparison in terms of scan time with helical scan mode will be discussed.

  • A prototype 0.5 tesla whole body imaging magnet system

    A prototype superconducting 0.5-T/1-m bore whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system recently completed by GA Technologies Inc. for Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) is described. The magnet system makes use of the following key features: a precision-wound, profiled, 250-A coil, which exhibits high inherent field uniformity ( approximately 100 p.p.m./50 cm DSV); superconducting shim coils, which allow uniformity without passive bore shims; a novel cold mass support system for omnidirectional 5-g support with low heat leak; two concentric heat shields, cooled by an integral Gifford-McMahon two-stage refrigerator, yielding a net helium boiloff at 0.1 L/h with no liquid-nitrogen system; mechanically retractable, thermally decoupling current leads; and low-current-drift persistent-mode operation (0.085 p.p.m./h), with an internal protection circuit.<<ETX>>

  • A 2-tesla active shield magnet for whole body imaging and spectroscopy

    A 2-T superconducting active shield magnet with a 0.99-m-diameter warm bore for whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy has been developed and tested. The magnet and cryostat were designed to meet the same performance standards as existing MRI magnets, but with the volume of the stray field region reduced to less than 4% of that for an unshielded magnet. The 0.5-mT stray field contour is within 5 m axially and 3 m radially of the magnet center. The system weight is only 14 t. The magnet operates at a current of 530 Amps with a stored energy of 9.5 MJ using low cost, high- copper-to-superconductor-ratio conductors on split-construction aluminum formers. The design involved extensive analysis of the stresses in the coils and formers and special consideration of the behavior during quench to avoid burnout or high-voltage breakdown. A low-loss cryostat was also developed with a titanium suspension system and two radiation shields but no liquid nitrogen, the shields being cooled by a single standard Gifford-McMahon refrigerator.

  • Small Animal X-ray Micro-CT with Zoom-in Imaging Capability

    Most of micro-CTs are capable of micron-resolution imaging if a small sample is of interest. Recent micro-CT developments with a flat-panel detector make it possible to scan the whole body of a small animal as large as a medium sized rat. However, the spatial resolution in the whole body imaging should be sacrificed down to the order of 100 mum due to the limitation in the number of X-ray detector pixels and low signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, we introduce an X-ray zoom-in micro tomography system which has localized imaging capability, i.e., high resolution imaging of a local ROI inside a large subject, for small animal imaging studies. In zoom-in micro tomography, two projection data sets, one obtained with a full FOV scan and the other obtained with a limited FOV scan, are acquired with different magnification ratios. To obtain exact images of the ROI, the out-of-FOV projection data are calculated from the full FOV projection data, and then, the calculated projection data are augmented to the limited FOV projection data. The zoom-in micro tomography system consists of a micro focus X-ray source, a CMOS flat-panel detector, a rotating gantry and a parallel data processing system. We have used the zoom- in micro tomography system for in vivo femoral bone imaging in osteoporosis studies with SD rat models in which fine trabecular bone structure imaging is essential.



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