Conferences related to US Department of Defense

Back to Top

2020 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

All areas of ionizing radiation detection - detectors, signal processing, analysis of results, PET development, PET results, medical imaging using ionizing radiation


2020 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting (PESGM)

The Annual IEEE PES General Meeting will bring together over 2900 attendees for technical sessions, administrative sessions, super sessions, poster sessions, student programs, awards ceremonies, committee meetings, tutorials and more


2019 20th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems & Eurosensors XXXIII (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXXIII)

The world's premiere conference in MEMS sensors, actuators and integrated micro and nano systems welcomes you to attend this four-day event showcasing major technological, scientific and commercial breakthroughs in mechanical, optical, chemical and biological devices and systems using micro and nanotechnology.The major areas of activity in the development of Transducers solicited and expected at this conference include but are not limited to: Bio, Medical, Chemical, and Micro Total Analysis Systems Fabrication and Packaging Mechanical and Physical Sensors Materials and Characterization Design, Simulation and Theory Actuators Optical MEMS RF MEMS Nanotechnology Energy and Power


2019 IEEE 15th International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE)

The conference is the primary forum for cross-industry and multidisciplinary research in automation. Its goal is to provide a broad coverage and dissemination of foundational research in automation among researchers, academics, and practitioners.


2019 IEEE 46th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


More Conferences

Periodicals related to US Department of Defense

Back to Top

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


Computational Intelligence Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine (CIM) publishes peer-reviewed articles that present emerging novel discoveries, important insights, or tutorial surveys in all areas of computational intelligence design and applications.


More Periodicals


Xplore Articles related to US Department of Defense

Back to Top

The SPIDERS project - Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security at US military facilities

2012 IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT), 2012

The SPIDERS project (Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security) is a three-year, $40 million, Joint Capabilities Technology Demonstration (JCTD) for the US Department of Defense (DoD) which will demonstrate secure microgrid implementations at three military installations. The SPIDERS microgrids will provide a number of benefits compared to conventional DoD electrical systems, including improved reliability for mission-critical loads, ...


From swords to plowshares (defense spending)

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

The effects of cutbacks in defense spending on employment are addressed. Issues discussed include early retirement of the 1950's engineering graduates and transfer of skills from defense to civilian work. Past cycles are examined in an attempt to learn some lessons that could be useful today. Suggestions are made as to what individual engineers can do to convert to civilian ...


Science on a Shoestring - Research Vessel Conversion

OCEANS '87, 1987

One of the challenges teaching institutions in oceanography face is to provide students meaningful sea time, given the very high costs of research vessel acquisition and operations. One approach to this problem is conversion. When a vessel built for one purpose is later dedicated to another, however, substantial alteration is usually necessary. Such was the case when F.I.T. accepted a ...


Industry: seeking strength in mergers

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

Industry response to the leveling off in US defense spending is examined. Attempts to enter joint production ventures in order to allay the risks of having fewer systems to bid on are discussed. Many of these joints ventures are international as there are fewer new program starts not only in the US but worldwide. Attention is on the aerospace segment ...


The iffy 'Orient Express' [hypersonic transport]

IEEE Spectrum, 1988

The X-30, a proposed hypersonic transport that could fly at up to 25 times the speed of sound, is discussed. Two current US programs are described: a joint US Department of Defense/NASA program for a national aerospace plane (NASP), and research into high-speed commercial flight by NASA. The technological requirements of such a vehicle are examined, and the issues raised ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on US Department of Defense

Back to Top

IEEE.tv Videos

APEC 2015: KeyTalks - US DOE perspective on Microgrids
Susan K. “Kathy” Land - Meet the 2019 IEEE Presidential Candidates
IMS 2010 Special Features: Zachary Lemnios, Keynote Speaker Follow up Interview
Cyber Security: Why It’s Everyone’s Business - Panel at IEEE WIE Forum USA East 2017
KeyTalks: The US Department of Energy's Perspective on Achieving Low Cost High Efficiency Energy
DoD CIO Brief to JHU APL IEEE 5G Summit - Frederick Moorefield - 5G Technologies for Tactical and First Responder Networks 2018
Navigating the (Mis)Perceptions of Autonomous Vehicles | IEEE TechEthics Public Forum
IMS 2015: Wearable electronics - why wear it?
Catherine A. Novelli - Internet Inclusion: Global Connect Stakeholders Advancing Solutions, Washington DC, 2016
A Comparator Design Targeted Towards Neural Net - David Mountain - ICRC San Mateo, 2019
IEEE Innovation Day 2011- Plenary Address
IMS 2010 - Plenary Keynote: Zachary Lemnios Director of Defense Research and Engineering DOD
The Upcoming Era of Specialization and the Research Needed to Make It Work for our Country - ICRC 2018 Plenary, William Chappell
Mind/Brain Research and AI Development: How Do They Inform Each Other? - IEEE TechEthics Panel
HKN Member Jung Uck Seo Receives Award at 2012 EAB Awards Ceremony
U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Overview - Dev Shenoy: 2016 International Conference on Rebooting Computing
Q&A with Dr. Al Emondi: IEEE Brain Podcast, Episode 13
Opening Panel: 2016 End to End Trust and Security Workshop for the Internet of Things
Speaker Manu Bhardwaj - ETAP San Jose 2015
Q-Band CMOS Transmitter System-on-Chip - Tim Larocca - RFIC Showcase 2018

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The SPIDERS project - Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security at US military facilities

    The SPIDERS project (Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security) is a three-year, $40 million, Joint Capabilities Technology Demonstration (JCTD) for the US Department of Defense (DoD) which will demonstrate secure microgrid implementations at three military installations. The SPIDERS microgrids will provide a number of benefits compared to conventional DoD electrical systems, including improved reliability for mission-critical loads, reduced reliance on fuel for diesel power (by using renewable energy sources during outages), increased efficiency of backup generators, reduced operational risk for energy systems through strong cyber security, and flexible electrical energy by building microgrid architectures which can selectively energize loads during extended outages. The three selected sites follow a “crawl, walk, run” progression with respect to microgrid technology, so at Hickam AFB (in Oahu, Hawaii) the SPIDERS microgrid will maintain critical loads along a single feeder, while at Ft. Carson (in Colorado Springs, Colorado) the project will encompass a significant portion of the main cantonment area, and at Camp Smith (also on Oahu, Hawaii and the headquarters of US Pacific Command) the entire facility will be on a SPIDERS microgrid. SPIDERS is funded by both DoD and the US Department of Energy (DOE), leveraging the capabilities and expertise of both agencies.

  • From swords to plowshares (defense spending)

    The effects of cutbacks in defense spending on employment are addressed. Issues discussed include early retirement of the 1950's engineering graduates and transfer of skills from defense to civilian work. Past cycles are examined in an attempt to learn some lessons that could be useful today. Suggestions are made as to what individual engineers can do to convert to civilian work.<<ETX>>

  • Science on a Shoestring - Research Vessel Conversion

    One of the challenges teaching institutions in oceanography face is to provide students meaningful sea time, given the very high costs of research vessel acquisition and operations. One approach to this problem is conversion. When a vessel built for one purpose is later dedicated to another, however, substantial alteration is usually necessary. Such was the case when F.I.T. accepted a 95' Vietnam era patrol boat to convert to a coastal research vessel for teaching and funded research. This paper highlights some of the political, engineering, and financial considerations that attend such a venture, and offers some unsolicited advice to those who would go and do likewise.

  • Industry: seeking strength in mergers

    Industry response to the leveling off in US defense spending is examined. Attempts to enter joint production ventures in order to allay the risks of having fewer systems to bid on are discussed. Many of these joints ventures are international as there are fewer new program starts not only in the US but worldwide. Attention is on the aerospace segment of the defense industry which has been hardest hit by the tighter acquisition environment in the US. Many companies are restructuring or merging. Another option being pursued is to penetrate commercial markets. Industry in general is beginning to spread out its R&D resources by funding joint research ventures and contracting out research.<<ETX>>

  • The iffy 'Orient Express' [hypersonic transport]

    The X-30, a proposed hypersonic transport that could fly at up to 25 times the speed of sound, is discussed. Two current US programs are described: a joint US Department of Defense/NASA program for a national aerospace plane (NASP), and research into high-speed commercial flight by NASA. The technological requirements of such a vehicle are examined, and the issues raised by the high cost of its development are examined. The question of schedules is discussed. Related research in the UK, West Germany, and Japan is noted.<<ETX>>

  • Education: trouble waiting in the wings

    The educational problems that underlie the decline in the US engineering labor force are addressed. The influence of the US Department of Defense (DoD), which is mostly felt indirectly through the research it sponsors at universities, is examined. Funding of university research by industry and the Federal Government (other than DoD) is discussed. A critical shortage of faculty, which is only a decade away, is also discussed.<<ETX>>

  • Back to the future: a perspective (defense spending)

    The impact of declines in defense spending on industry is considered. Cutbacks following World War II and the Korean and Vietnam Wars are examined in an attempt to assess what the effect would be if the current reduction in defense budget growth proves to be another decline rather than a plateau.<<ETX>>

  • Abstract: Power Line Filter Pass Band Versus Stop Band

    None

  • R&amp;amp;D: salvation in verification

    The impact of arms reductions on US Government R&D funding is discussed. It is noted that funding will probably be cut at worst by a percentage point or two, propped up by large programs such as the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), and with opportunities in newer defense priorities such as surveillance and the force multiplication technologies that will increase the effectiveness of the smaller forces deployed. Trends in overall spending are examined, and particular programs are considered. Declines in research spending as opposed to development and the role of university R&D are discussed.<<ETX>>

  • The Department of Transportation Loran-C study

    The 1994 Federal Radionavigation Plan (FRP) stated that the US Department of Transportation (DOT) would terminate operation of the Loran-C radionavigation system no later than the end of the year 2000. In 1996, the US Congress directed the DOT to conduct a study of this decision, and to prepare a report to the Congress "defining the future use of and funding for operations, maintenance, and upgrades of the Loran-C radionavigation system". That study was begun in August 1997, and is near its completion. The study provide insights into the technical, economic and political factors which affect the operation and sustainment of radionavigation, and by extension, other highly valued government-provided services.



Standards related to US Department of Defense

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "US Department of Defense"


Jobs related to US Department of Defense

Back to Top