Taxonomy

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Taxonomy is the practice and science of classification. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Taxonomy

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2019 IEEE 17th International Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN)

Industrial information technologies


2019 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (SMC)

2019 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC2019) will be held in the south of Europe in Bari, one of the most beautiful and historical cities in Italy. The Bari region’s nickname is “Little California” for its nice weather and Bari's cuisine is one of Italian most traditional , based of local seafood and olive oil. SMC2019 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report up-to-the-minute innovations and developments, summarize state­of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems and cybernetics. Advances have importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience, and thereby improve quality of life.


2019 IEEE International Professional Communication Conference (ProComm)

The scope of the conference includes the study, development, improvement, and promotion ofeffective techniques for preparing, organizing, processing, editing, collecting, conserving,teaching, and disseminating any form of technical information by and to individuals and groupsby any method of communication. It also includes technical, scientific, industrial, and otheractivities that contribute to the techniques and products used in this field.


2019 IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and severalco-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides anexceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2020 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2018 IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premier annual computer vision event comprising the main conference and several co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry researchers.

  • 2017 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conferenceand 27co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides anexceptional value for students,academics and industry.

  • 2016 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry.

  • 2015 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    computer, vision, pattern, cvpr, machine, learning

  • 2014 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. Main conference plus 50 workshop only attendees and approximately 50 exhibitors and volunteers.

  • 2013 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    CVPR is the premiere annual Computer Vision event comprising the main CVPR conference and 27 co-located workshops and short courses. With its high quality and low cost, it provides an exceptional value for students, academics and industry.

  • 2012 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Topics of interest include all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition including motion and tracking,stereo, object recognition, object detection, color detection plus many more

  • 2011 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Sensors Early and Biologically-Biologically-inspired Vision, Color and Texture, Segmentation and Grouping, Computational Photography and Video

  • 2010 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Concerned with all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition. Issues of interest include pattern, analysis, image, and video libraries, vision and graphics, motion analysis and physics-based vision.

  • 2009 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

    Concerned with all aspects of computer vision and pattern recognition. Issues of interest include pattern, analysis, image, and video libraries, vision and graphics,motion analysis and physics-based vision.

  • 2008 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2007 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2006 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)

  • 2005 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,


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Periodicals related to Taxonomy

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Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE

Each tutorial reviews currents communications topics in network management and computer and wireless communications. Available tutorials, which are 2.5 to 5 hours in length contains the original visuals and voice-over by the presenter. IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials features two distinct types of articles: original articles and reprints. The original articles are exclusively written for IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Taxonomy

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Xplore Articles related to Taxonomy

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Mobile Agent Coordination

Mobile Agents in Networking and Distributed Computing, None

None


The collaborating spider

IEEE Internet Computing, 1997

None


A Taxonomy Approach to Introductory Programming

Digest of the Fifth Biennial IEEE Conference on Electromagnetic Field Computation, 1992

Summary from only given, as follows. A brief premise is given that computer programming is becoming the specialized domain of a few. The Taxonomy of Sequential Programming is presented as an organized approach to teaching programming so that the student fully understands the ideas. Concurrence is used to extend the taxonomy from the sequential only to the sequential and parallel ...


Fault Diagnosis in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, 2013

The sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks may be deployed in unattended and possibly hostile environments. The ill-disposed environment affects the monitoring infrastructure that includes the sensor nodes and the network. In addition, node failures and environmental hazards cause frequent topology changes, communication failures, and network partitioning. This in turn adds a new dimension to the fragility of the network ...


Quasi-algebraic decompositions of switching functions

Proceedings Sixteenth Conference on Advanced Research in VLSI, 1995

Brayton (1982-90) and others have developed a rich theory of decomposition of switching functions based on algebraic manipulations of monomials. In this theory, a product g(X/sub g/)/spl middot/h(X/sub h/) is algebraic if X/sub g//spl cap/X/sub h/=O. There are efficient methods for determining if a function has an algebraic product. If a function does not have an algebraic product, then there ...


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Educational Resources on Taxonomy

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Mobile Agent Coordination

    None

  • The collaborating spider

    None

  • A Taxonomy Approach to Introductory Programming

    Summary from only given, as follows. A brief premise is given that computer programming is becoming the specialized domain of a few. The Taxonomy of Sequential Programming is presented as an organized approach to teaching programming so that the student fully understands the ideas. Concurrence is used to extend the taxonomy from the sequential only to the sequential and parallel programening arena. Examples from Pascal and Ada are given which demonstrate the use of taxonomy.

  • Fault Diagnosis in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    The sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks may be deployed in unattended and possibly hostile environments. The ill-disposed environment affects the monitoring infrastructure that includes the sensor nodes and the network. In addition, node failures and environmental hazards cause frequent topology changes, communication failures, and network partitioning. This in turn adds a new dimension to the fragility of the network topology. Such perturbations are far more common than those found in conventional wireless networks thus, demand efficient techniques for discovering disruptive behavior in such networks. Traditional fault diagnosis techniques devised for multiprocessor systems are not directly applicable to wireless sensor networks due to their specific requirements and limitations. This survey integrates research efforts that have been produced in fault diagnosis specifically for wireless sensor networks. The survey aims at clarifying and uncovering the potential of this technology by providing the technique-based taxonomy. The fault diagnosis techniques are classified based on the nature of the tests, correlation between sensor readings and characteristics of sensor nodes and the network.

  • Quasi-algebraic decompositions of switching functions

    Brayton (1982-90) and others have developed a rich theory of decomposition of switching functions based on algebraic manipulations of monomials. In this theory, a product g(X/sub g/)/spl middot/h(X/sub h/) is algebraic if X/sub g//spl cap/X/sub h/=O. There are efficient methods for determining if a function has an algebraic product. If a function does not have an algebraic product, then there are good methods for obtaining a decomposition of the form f=g/spl middot/h+r where g/spl middot/h is an algebraic product. Algebraic decompositions have the desirable properties that they are canonical and preserve testability. In this paper we generalize the concept of an algebraic product to decompositions of the form f(X)=g(X/sub g/)??h(X/sub h/) where ?? is any binary Boolean operation and |X/sub g//spl cap/X/sub h/|=k for some k/spl ges/0. We call these decompositions quasi-algebraic decompositions. We begin by showing that we may restrict ourselves to the case where ?? is +(sum),/spl middot/(product) or /spl oplus/ (enclusive-or). We then give necessary and sufficient conditions for a function to have a quasi-algebraic decomposition for a given X/sub g/ and X/sub h/. If a function has such a decomposition we show how to determine the functions g and h in a canonical manner. We also show that these decompositions are fully SSL testable. Finally, using standard benchmark circuits, we show that quasi algebraic decompositions occur often and are useful in reducing circuit size.

  • Classified Iconography A New Data Model for the Warburg Institute Iconographic Database

    This paper explains the historical background of the Warburg Institute Iconographic Database and discusses its current design and contents and some of the shortcomings that have emerged over the years. It highlights the principal features of the new data model that forms the foundation for the next version of the resource.

  • Question classification for medical domain Question Answering system

    Question classification plays an important role in question answering system. It helps in finding or constructing accurate answers and hence improves the quality of Question Answering systems. The question classification approaches generally used are: Rule based, Machine learning and Hybrid. This paper presents our research work on question classification through rule based approach. The question processing module helps in assigning a suitable question category and identifying the keywords from the given input question. A prototype system based on the proposed method has been constructed and the experiment on 500 medical questions collected from patients and doctors has been carried out. Using the two layered taxonomy of 6 course grain and 50 fine grained categories developed by Li and Roth, we have classified the questions into various categories. We have also studied the syntactic structure of the question and suggest the syntactic patterns for particular category of questions. Using these question patterns we have classified the question into particular category. In this paper we have proposed a compact and effective method for question classification. The experimental output shows that even with small set of question categories we can classify the questions with more satisfactory and better result.

  • A First Step towards an Epistemology of the Subjective Uncertainty: Its Premises and Modeling

    The uncertainty may be divides it into two major groups, "objective uncertainty" and "subjective uncertainty". The objective uncertainty has already been extensively explored in works on classic probability, but this is not the case with subjective uncertainty, a field of knowledge where there is not even a well established epistemology. In this work we show a first step towards an epistemology of the subjective uncertainty, its premises, and also a way to model them. If a system fails to model all the premises it will not be able to generically model the subjective uncertainty. This is what happens, for example, with the rules of combination until now used within the Dempster- Shafer Theory, one of the formal models that deals with subjective uncertainty. The Dempster-Shafer Theory provides a method for combining evidence from different sources without prior knowledge of their distributions, however, it has some pitfalls caused by an incomplete modeling of the premises. In this paper we present a method that models the three subjective uncertainty premises (the explicit lack of knowledge, the conflict among the evidence, and the non- uniqueness of the assignment of belief and relative division of the belief among the hypotheses chosen), extending the Dempster-Shafer Theory, correcting its counterintuitive behavior, and allowing its use in a broad range of situations.

  • Forms of expression for designing visual languages for animation

    We present further steps in our research into visual languages for animation. Animation is a rich mode of communication that is currently accessible to few, because animation systems are complex. Some systems try to make animation simple but put severe limits on users' creative expression. Our field studies are demonstrating that would-be animators need to express animation in a wide variety of ways. We are developing a taxonomy of forms of expression for animation that will help the designers of visual languages for animation to determine which expressive forms to support. Our end goal is to build animation sketching systems that use pen input to make animation universally accessible.

  • Student Self-Assessment by Counting the Times of Repetition

    This paper describes an experiment, which target is to develop a simple reliable Web-based student self-assessment system for our programming course. We compared a simple four step scale and a six-step scale modified from Bloom's Taxonomy. Both scales were tested with about 90 students and the results were compared to the students' exam grades. Both scales gave similar results but the six-step scale seemed to overestimate students' skills.



Standards related to Taxonomy

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No standards are currently tagged "Taxonomy"