Software quality

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In the context of software engineering, software quality refers to two related but distinct notions that exist wherever quality is defined in a business context: Software functional quality reflects how well it complies/conforms to a given design, based on functional requirements or specifications. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Software quality

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2020 Optical Fiber Communications Conference and Exhibition (OFC)

The Optical Fiber Communication Conference and Exhibition (OFC) is the largest global conference and exhibition for optical communications and networking professionals. For over 40 years, OFC has drawn attendees from all corners of the globe to meet and greet, teach and learn, make connections and move business forward.OFC attracts the biggest names in the field, offers key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration on the major trends and technology advances affecting the industry. From technical presentations to the latest market trends and predictions, OFC is a one-stop-shop.


IEEE INFOCOM 2020 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications

IEEE INFOCOM solicits research papers describing significant and innovative researchcontributions to the field of computer and data communication networks. We invite submissionson a wide range of research topics, spanning both theoretical and systems research.


2019 44th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz)

Science, technology and applications spanning the millimeter-waves, terahertz and infrared spectral regions


2019 IEEE 17th International Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN)

Industrial information technologies


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,


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Periodicals related to Software quality

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Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


Communications Letters, IEEE

Covers topics in the scope of IEEE Transactions on Communications but in the form of very brief publication (maximum of 6column lengths, including all diagrams and tables.)


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Software quality

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No authors for "Software quality"


Xplore Articles related to Software quality

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Architecture recovery for software evolution

Proceedings of the Second Euromicro Conference on Software Maintenance and Reengineering, 1998

The maintenance is a costly activity in the life cycle of software-intensive systems, especially when they must as adapted to evolving requirements, which is more likely as the size of the system grows. Software architecture is a novel approach to the development of such systems, that guides the process focusing the architects' attention on the structure of the system being ...


Keynote talk: To use or not to use? The metrics to measure software quality (developers' view)

2009 13th European Conference on Software Maintenance and Reengineering, 2009

Summary form only given, as follows. The complete presentation was not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. The research related to software product metrics is becoming increasingly important and widespread. One of the most popular research topics in this area is the development of different software quality models that are based on product metrics. These quality ...


The application of fuzzy enhanced case-based reasoning for identifying fault-prone modules

Proceedings Third IEEE International High-Assurance Systems Engineering Symposium (Cat. No.98EX231), 1998

As highly reliable software is becoming an essential ingredient in many systems, the process of assuring reliability can be a time-consuming, costly process. One way to improve the efficiency of the quality assurance process is to target reliability enhancement activities to those modules that are likely to have the most problems. Within the field of software engineering, much research has ...


Process assurance audits: lessons learned

Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Software Engineering, 1998

During 1997, a large Information System (IS) Division of a Canadian phone company implemented formal process assurance in its Quality Assurance group. The status report presents a new perspective on the measurement of process assurance and the lessons learned after one year of assessing the individual conformance of software development projects to the corporate software development process (CSDP) of the ...


(CSDP) Software Quality

(CSDP) Software Quality, 06/30/2011

This tutorial is part of a series of eLearning courses designed to help you prepare for the examination to become a Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) or to learn more about specific software engineering topics. Courses in this series address one or more of the fifteen Knowledge Areas that comprise the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge - or SWEBOK, upon ...


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Educational Resources on Software quality

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Architecture recovery for software evolution

    The maintenance is a costly activity in the life cycle of software-intensive systems, especially when they must as adapted to evolving requirements, which is more likely as the size of the system grows. Software architecture is a novel approach to the development of such systems, that guides the process focusing the architects' attention on the structure of the system being built, thus allowing a controlled evolution. This approach is applied for large systems or families of products with a long evolution path, and is usually performed once a successful system has been built, so in fact its application requires recovery techniques in order to obtain and incorporate as much information as possible. Furthermore, since these systems tend to be large, automatic aids must be used by engineers in the recovery tasks to do cost effective work. The article describes the experience of architectural recovery of a large telecommunication system, presents the characteristics of the architectural recovery process applied, reviews some of the available recovery techniques and organises their application for software architecture recovery.

  • Keynote talk: To use or not to use? The metrics to measure software quality (developers' view)

    Summary form only given, as follows. The complete presentation was not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. The research related to software product metrics is becoming increasingly important and widespread. One of the most popular research topics in this area is the development of different software quality models that are based on product metrics. These quality models can be used to assist software project managers in making decisions e.g. if the most “critical” parts of the code have been identified by using an error-proneness model, the testing resources can be concentrated on these parts of the code. As another example, the quality models based on complexity and coupling metrics may assist in estimating the cost of software changes (impact analysis). Many empirical studies have been conducted to validate these quality models. The main aim of these empirical investigations has been to identify which metrics are the best predictors to estimate the changes of software quality. The examination of the applicability of the quality models to different application domains and development platforms is also a very interesting research area. Besides the intensive research activities, software product metrics have also been integrated into the practical development processes of many software companies. This is partly due to the fact that generally a top-level management prefers to make its decisions relying on measurable data. Our industrial experiences show that the people responsible for software quality and top-level project managers are also interested in applying quality monitoring tools based on product metrics. Obviously, the advantages of using such a tool should be clearly defined, but it should be noted as well that its use in the daily development process may require significant additional resources. On the other hand, according to our experiences, convincing developers about the usefulness of software product metrics can be very difficult. When analysing concrete metrics, the developers’ first reaction is usually looking for examples that justify the substantial deviation from the proposed metric value. Developers can hardly accept that there is a correlation between the metrics and the quality of the software developed by them. Consequently, we conducted a study where we asked the opinion of developers working in different fields and on different platforms about software product metrics. The experts participating in the study possessed different development skills (young developers and senior ones with many years of experience). The participants worked on C/C++, C#, Java and SQL platforms. Since some of the developers worked in open-source projects, open-source related questions were also included in the study. Besides the questions related to size, complexity, and coupling metrics, we asked the developers’ opinion about coding rule violations and copy-paste programming. We asked every developer to mark a so-called reference system (a system whose development process he had actively participated in). These reference systems have been analyzed with the Columbus tool, and we calculated metrics, rule violations and clones. Besides the general questions, in the study we included questions that were related to the metrics derived from the given reference system. The answers were evaluated on the basis of different aspects. We examined to what extent the developers’ professional skills, the development platforms and the specialities of a given application domain can affect the answers.

  • The application of fuzzy enhanced case-based reasoning for identifying fault-prone modules

    As highly reliable software is becoming an essential ingredient in many systems, the process of assuring reliability can be a time-consuming, costly process. One way to improve the efficiency of the quality assurance process is to target reliability enhancement activities to those modules that are likely to have the most problems. Within the field of software engineering, much research has been performed to allow developers to identify fault-prone modules within a project. Software quality classification models can select the modules that are the most likely to contain faults so that reliability enhancement activities can be performed to lower the occurrences of software faults and errors. This paper introduces fuzzy logic combined with case-based reasoning (CBR) to determine fault-prone modules given a set of software metrics. Combining these two techniques promises more robust, flexible and accurate models. In this paper, we describe this approach, apply it in a real- world case study and discuss the results. The case study applied this approach to software quality modeling using data from a military command, control and communications (C/sup 3/) system. The fuzzy CBR model had an overall classification accuracy of more than 85%. This paper also discusses possible improvements and enhancements to the initial model that can be explored in the future.

  • Process assurance audits: lessons learned

    During 1997, a large Information System (IS) Division of a Canadian phone company implemented formal process assurance in its Quality Assurance group. The status report presents a new perspective on the measurement of process assurance and the lessons learned after one year of assessing the individual conformance of software development projects to the corporate software development process (CSDP) of the organization. The status report presents the assurance process overview, goals. Benefits and scope, as well as the 1997 results overview, followed by the lessons learned for the 1998 audit program.

  • (CSDP) Software Quality

    This tutorial is part of a series of eLearning courses designed to help you prepare for the examination to become a Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) or to learn more about specific software engineering topics. Courses in this series address one or more of the fifteen Knowledge Areas that comprise the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge - or SWEBOK, upon which the Certification Exam is based. Within each course module, there is a list of textbooks, courses and relevant reference materials to assist you in preparing for the Certification Exam. Software Quality deals with considerations which transcend the life cycle process. Software quality is a ubiquitous concern in software engineering, and do it is also considered in many of the KAs. In particular, this KA covers static techniques - those which do not require the execution of the software being evaluated, while dynamic techniques are covered in the Software Testing KA. This course is intended to assess your understanding of software quality through inline quizzes and feedback. Specific topics addressed in this course are: fundamentals of software quality, software quality management processes, and software quality practical considerations.

  • Rapid software development through team collocation

    In a field study conducted at a leading Fortune 100 company, we examined how having development teams reside in their own large room (an arrangement called radical collocation) affected system development. The collocated projects had significantly higher productivity and shorter schedules than both the industry benchmarks and the performance of past similar projects within the firm. The teams reported high satisfaction about their process, and both customers and project sponsors were similarly highly satisfied. The analysis of questionnaire, interview and observational data from these teams showed that being "at hand," i.e. both visible and available, helped them to coordinate their work better and learn from each other. Radical collocation seems to be one of the factors leading to high productivity in these teams.

  • Effective Test Driven Development for Embedded Software

    Methodologies for effectively managing software development risk and producing quality software are taking hold in the IT industry. However, similar practices for embedded systems, particularly in resource constrained systems, have not yet become prevalent. Today, quality in embedded software is generally tied to platform-specific testing tools geared towards debugging. We present here an integrated collection of concrete concepts and practices that are decoupled from platform-specific tools. In fact, our approach drives the actual design of embedded software. These strategies yield good design, systems that are testable under automation, and a significant reduction in software flaws. Examples from an 8 bit system with 16k of program memory and 255 bytes of RAM illustrate these ideas

  • Analyzing Software System Quality Risk Using Bayesian Belief Network

    Uncertainty during the period of software project development often brings huge risks to contractors and clients. Developing an effective method to predict the cost and quality of software projects based on facts such as project characteristics and two-side cooperation capability at the beginning of the project can aid us in finding ways to reduce the risks. Bayesian belief network (BBN) is a good tool for analyzing uncertain consequences, but it is difficult to produce precise network structure and conditional probability table. In this paper, we build up the network structure by Delphi method for conditional probability table learning, and learn to update the probability table and confidence levels of the nodes continuously according to application cases, which would subsequently make the evaluation network to have learning abilities, and to evaluate the software development risks in organizations more accurately. This paper also introduces the EM algorithm to enhance the ability in producing hidden nodes caused by variant software projects.

  • Prioritization of Scenarios Based on UML Activity Diagrams

    Increased size and complexity of software requires better methods for different activities in the software development lifecycle. Quality assurance of software is primarily done by means of testing, an activity that faces constraints of both time and resources. Hence, there is need to test effectively within the constraints in order to maximize throughput i.e. rate of fault detection, coverage, etc. Test case prioritization involves techniques aimed at finding the best prioritized test suite. In this paper, we propose a prioritization technique based on UML activity diagrams. The constructs of an activity diagram are used to prioritize scenarios. Preliminary results obtained on a case-study indicate that the technique is effective in extracting the critical scenarios from the activity diagram.

  • Software patterns: Design utilities

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Standards related to Software quality

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IEEE Recommended Practice on Software Reliability

Software reliability (SR) models have been evaluated and ranked for their applicability to various situations. Many improvements have been made in SR modeling and prediction since 1992. This revised recommended practice reflects those advances in SR since 1992, including modeling and prediction for distributed and network systems. Situation specific usage guidance was refined and updated. The methodologies and tools included ...


Systems and software engineering -- Software life cycle processes

This International Standard establishes a common framework for software life cycle processes, with welldefined terminology, that can be referenced by the software industry. It contains processes, activities, and tasks that are to be applied during the acquisition of a software product or service and during the supply, development, operation, maintenance and disposal of software products. Software includes the software portion ...