Conferences related to Servers

Back to Top

2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


ICC 2021 - IEEE International Conference on Communications

IEEE ICC is one of the two flagship IEEE conferences in the field of communications; Montreal is to host this conference in 2021. Each annual IEEE ICC conference typically attracts approximately 1,500-2,000 attendees, and will present over 1,000 research works over its duration. As well as being an opportunity to share pioneering research ideas and developments, the conference is also an excellent networking and publicity event, giving the opportunity for businesses and clients to link together, and presenting the scope for companies to publicize themselves and their products among the leaders of communications industries from all over the world.


2020 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and North American Radio Science Meeting

The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of the art research in the area of antennas and propagation, electromagnetic engineering and radio science


2020 IEEE/PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition (T&D)

Bi-Annual IEEE PES T&D conference. Largest T&D conference in North America.


IECON 2020 - 46th Annual Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society

IECON is focusing on industrial and manufacturing theory and applications of electronics, controls, communications, instrumentation and computational intelligence.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Servers

Back to Top

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Communications Letters, IEEE

Covers topics in the scope of IEEE Transactions on Communications but in the form of very brief publication (maximum of 6column lengths, including all diagrams and tables.)


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Computer Architecture Letters

Rigorously peer-reviewed forum for publishing early, high-impact results in the areas of uni- and multiprocessors computer systems, computer architecture workload characterization, performance evaluation and simulation techniques, and power-aware computing


More Periodicals


Xplore Articles related to Servers

Back to Top

National Supercomputing Center mass storage system requirements

[1991] Digest of Papers Eleventh IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, 1991

As part of the National Supercomputing Center effort to define mass storage requirements and directions, six national centers were asked to fill out a questionnaire on the topic. Mass storage system requirements deemed significant by the respondents are presented.<<ETX>>


The verification of secure distributed systems

COMPCON Spring '91 Digest of Papers, 1991

The authors discuss the design issues related to secure distributed systems, particularly with respect to verification, and survey a few systems to see how they address these issues. They present specification and verification techniques that are applicable to secure distributed systems, emphasizing an approach to achieving a verified design through the hook-up of verified components. Finally, they discuss how this ...


Safe caching in a distributed file system for network attached storage

Proceedings 14th International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium. IPDPS 2000, 2000

In a distributed file system built on network attached storage, client computers access data directly from shared storage, rather than submitting I/O requests through a server. Without a server marshaling access to data, if a computer fails or becomes isolated in a network partition while holding locks on cached data objects, those objects become inaccessible to other computers until a ...


Minimizing bandwidth requirements for on-demand data delivery

IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, 2001

Two recent techniques for multicast or broadcast delivery of streaming media can provide immediate service to each client request, yet achieve considerable client stream sharing which leads to significant server and network bandwidth savings. The paper considers: 1) how well these recently proposed techniques perform relative to each other and 2) whether there are new practical delivery techniques that can ...


Client-Server Paradigm for Interactive TV

IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics, 1994

None


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Servers

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • National Supercomputing Center mass storage system requirements

    As part of the National Supercomputing Center effort to define mass storage requirements and directions, six national centers were asked to fill out a questionnaire on the topic. Mass storage system requirements deemed significant by the respondents are presented.<<ETX>>

  • The verification of secure distributed systems

    The authors discuss the design issues related to secure distributed systems, particularly with respect to verification, and survey a few systems to see how they address these issues. They present specification and verification techniques that are applicable to secure distributed systems, emphasizing an approach to achieving a verified design through the hook-up of verified components. Finally, they discuss how this approach can be applied to a secure distributed system design.<<ETX>>

  • Safe caching in a distributed file system for network attached storage

    In a distributed file system built on network attached storage, client computers access data directly from shared storage, rather than submitting I/O requests through a server. Without a server marshaling access to data, if a computer fails or becomes isolated in a network partition while holding locks on cached data objects, those objects become inaccessible to other computers until a locking authority can guarantee that the lock holder will not again directly access these data. We describe a server that acts as the locking authority and implements a lease-based protocol for revoking access to data objects locked by an isolated or failed computer. When a lease expires, the server can be assured that the client no longer acts on locked data, and can safely redistribute locks to other clients. During normal operation, this protocol invokes no message overhead, and uses no memory and performs no computation at the locking authority.

  • Minimizing bandwidth requirements for on-demand data delivery

    Two recent techniques for multicast or broadcast delivery of streaming media can provide immediate service to each client request, yet achieve considerable client stream sharing which leads to significant server and network bandwidth savings. The paper considers: 1) how well these recently proposed techniques perform relative to each other and 2) whether there are new practical delivery techniques that can achieve better bandwidth savings than the previous techniques over a wide range of client request rates. The principal results are as follows: First, the recent partitioned dynamic skyscraper technique is adapted to provide immediate service to each client request more simply and directly than the original dynamic skyscraper method. Second, at moderate to high client request rates, the dynamic skyscraper method has required server bandwidth that is significantly lower than the recent optimized stream tapping/patching/controlled multicast technique. Third, the minimum required server bandwidth for any delivery technique that provides immediate real-time delivery to clients increases logarithmically (with constant factor equal to one) as a function of the client request arrival rate. Furthermore, it is (theoretically) possible to achieve very close to the minimum required server bandwidth if client receive bandwidth is equal to two times the data streaming rate and client storage capacity is sufficient for buffering data from shared streams. Finally, we propose a new practical delivery technique, called hierarchical multicast stream merging (HMSM), which has a required server bandwidth that is lower than the partitioned dynamic skyscraper and is reasonably close to the minimum achievable required server bandwidth over a wide range of client request rates.

  • Client-Server Paradigm for Interactive TV

    None

  • E-systems Modular Automated Storage System (EMASS) software functionality

    The software functionality of the E-Systems Modular Automated Storage System (EMASS) is described. EMASS is a complete data storage and retrieval system that operates as a large data storage node on a network, servicing client requests over a number of different interfaces. The EMASS server, a CONVEX supercomputer, stores files in an extended UNIX File System. These extensions provide for transparent migration of files onto magnetic tape. EMASS mass storage control software is written in the C programming language and utilizes the INGRES RDBMS to track the files and tapes managed by EMASS.<<ETX>>

  • An architecture for active hypertext on distributed systems

    The combination of hypertext and distributed systems technologies enhances effectiveness in information management and dissemination. An architecture which integrates these technologies is presented, the issues that influenced its design are cited, and its realization is outlined. Easy and graceful integration of new applications in the framework is supported by the generic and extensible character of the architecture. The proposed architecture caters for activity; event-driven computations constantly cheek for the preservation of consistency and rigidly enforce the behavior specified by the application programmer. A production rule formalism is used to customize the structure of the hypergraph and define additional constraints on the semantics of the server operations.<<ETX>>

  • Grouping techniques for update propagation in intermittently connected databases

    We consider an environment where one or more servers carry databases that are of interest to a community of clients. The clients are only intermittently connected to the server for brief periods of time. Clients carry a part of the database for their own processing and accumulate local updates while disconnected. We call this the Intermittently Connected Database (ICDB) environment. ICDBs have a wide variety of applications including sales force automation, insurance claim processing, and mobile workforces. Our focus is on the problem of update propagation at the server in ICDBs and the associated processing at the clients. The typical client-centric approach involves the communication and processing of updates and transactions on a per-client basis, ignoring the overlap of data between clients. The complexity of this approach is in the order of the number of connecting clients, thereby limiting the scalability of the server. We propose a data-centric approach which clusters data into groups and assigns to each client one or more of these groups. The proposed scheme results in server processing complexity on the order of the number of groups, which we control. We propose various techniques for grouping and discuss the processing required at the clients to enable the grouping approach. While the client-centric approach is expected to significantly degrade with the increasing number of clients, we expect that a properly designed grouping scheme will sustain a number of clients that is significantly larger. A prototype has been developed and performance studies are in progress.

  • Performance and stability analysis of multilevel data structures with deferred reorganization

    We develop a methodology for analyzing the performance and stability of a server that maintains a multilevel data structure to service a set of access operations for (key, value) records. A subset of the operations executed by the server (e.g., insert and delete) require the multilevel data structure be reorganized so that the sewer can execute all subsequent requests efficiently. We study how often the server should carry out data reorganization (i.e., maintenance) to maximize its performance. If the server is frequently idle then there is no need to impose the reorganization overhead on the operation requests. The reorganization overhead may be completely eliminated by utilizing server-idling periods. If the server is frequently busy, then the reorganization overhead can be minimized by performing a complete reorganization only after the server has served a sufficient number of insert/delete operations so that the amortized cost per operation is small. Therefore, the issue of how often one should perform data reorganization to minimize the average service time depends not only on the multilevel data structure maintained by the server but also on the type and intensity of the system workload. The proposed methodology is exemplified with a two-level sorted file with deferred maintenance. The performance and stability results are compared with those of a single-level binary tree data structure with on- the-fly maintenance. It is shown that deferred maintenance of the two-level sorted file outperforms on-the-fly maintenance of the single-level binary tree in both open and closed systems. Furthermore, deferred maintenance can sustain higher workload intensities without risking system stability.

  • An AFS-based mass storage system at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

    The AFS (Andrew File System) with extensions forms the basis of the distributed mass storage system being implemented at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC). AFS offers transparent, locally cached, secure access to a universal file name space from a wide variety of UNIX platforms. The PSC is extending the standard AFS offering to provide a number of features that are useful in a supercomputing environment. The extensions include a port of AFS client code to Unicos and modifications to support high-performance disk arrays and archival servers such as the Common File System, UniTree, and robotic NSF systems. These features are implemented by the development of generalized multiple residency extensions for AFS servers. Data migration strategies are being developed. The PSC extensions require no changes to the user's AFS client code.<<ETX>>



Standards related to Servers

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Servers"