Conferences related to Sea surface salinity

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


IGARSS 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

All fields of satellite, airborne and ground remote sensing.


OCEANS 2020 - SINGAPORE

An OCEANS conference is a major forum for scientists, engineers, and end-users throughout the world to present and discuss the latest research results, ideas, developments, and applications in all areas of oceanic science and engineering. Each conference has a specific theme chosen by the conference technical program committee. All papers presented at the conference are subsequently archived in the IEEE Xplore online database. The OCEANS conference comprises a scientific program with oral and poster presentations, and a state of the art exhibition in the field of ocean engineering and marine technology. In addition, each conference can have tutorials, workshops, panel discussions, technical tours, awards ceremonies, receptions, and other professional and social activities.

  • OCEANS 2019 - Marseille

    Research, Development, and Operations pertaining to the Oceans

  • 2018 OCEANS - MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Ocean (OTO)

    The conference scope is to provide a thematic umbrella for researchers working in OCEAN engineering and related fields across the world to discuss the problems and potential long term solutions that concernnot only the oceans in Asian pacific region, but the world ocean in general.

  • OCEANS 2017 - Aberdeen

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town hall meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2016 - Shanghai

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorial on ocean technology, workshops and town hall meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2015 - Genova

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Society of IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 50-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014 - TAIPEI

    The OCEANS conference covers all aspects of ocean engineering from physics aspects through development and operation of undersea vehicles and equipment.

  • OCEANS 2013 - NORWAY

    Ocean related technologies. Program includes tutorials, three days of technical papers and a concurrent exhibition. Student poster competition.

  • OCEANS 2012 - YEOSU

    The OCEANS conferences covers four days with tutorials, exhibits and three days of parallel tracks that address all aspects of oceanic engineering.

  • OCEANS 2011 - SPAIN

    All Oceans related technologies.

  • OCEANS 2010 IEEE - Sydney

  • OCEANS 2009 - EUROPE

  • OCEANS 2008 - MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Ocean

  • OCEANS 2007 - EUROPE

    The theme 'Marine Challenges: Coastline to Deep Sea' focuses on the significant challenges, from the shallowest waters around our coasts to the deepest subsea trenches, that face marine, subsea and oceanic engineers in their drive to understand the complexities of the world's oceans.

  • OCEANS 2006 - ASIA PACIFIC

  • OCEANS 2005 - EUROPE


Oceans 2020 MTS/IEEE GULF COAST

To promote awareness, understanding, advancement and application of ocean engineering and marine technology. This includes all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

  • OCEANS 2018 MTS/IEEE Charleston

    Ocean, coastal, and atmospheric science and technology advances and applications

  • OCEANS 2017 - Anchorage

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2016

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2009

  • OCEANS 2008

    The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) cosponsor a joint conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, education, and policy. Held annually in the fall, it has become a focal point for the ocean and marine community to meet, learn, and exhibit products and services. The conference includes technical sessions, workshops, student poster sessions, job fairs, tutorials and a large exhibit.

  • OCEANS 2007

  • OCEANS 2006

  • OCEANS 2005

  • OCEANS 2004

  • OCEANS 2003

  • OCEANS 2002

  • OCEANS 2001

  • OCEANS 2000

  • OCEANS '99

  • OCEANS '98

  • OCEANS '97

  • OCEANS '96


2018 IEEE 15th Specialist Meeting on Microwave Radiometry and Remote Sensing of the Environment (MicroRad)

Theory and Applications of Microwave Radiometry


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Periodicals related to Sea surface salinity

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Computing in Science & Engineering

Physics, medicine, astronomy—these and other hard sciences share a common need for efficient algorithms, system software, and computer architecture to address large computational problems. And yet, useful advances in computational techniques that could benefit many researchers are rarely shared. To meet that need, Computing in Science & Engineering (CiSE) presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format. ...


Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE

It is expected that GRS Letters will apply to a wide range of remote sensing activities looking to publish shorter, high-impact papers. Topics covered will remain within the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Societys field of interest: the theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and ...


Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.


Microwave Theory and Techniques, IEEE Transactions on

Microwave theory, techniques, and applications as they relate to components, devices, circuits, and systems involving the generation, transmission, and detection of microwaves.


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Most published Xplore authors for Sea surface salinity

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Xplore Articles related to Sea surface salinity

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Satellite Observed Hotspot in the Pacific Ocean

IEEE Power Engineering Review, 1992

None


Advances in density and abundance estimation for cetaceans using geospatial modeling

Oceans 2003. Celebrating the Past ... Teaming Toward the Future (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37492), 2003

To identify and quantify spatial patterns in cetacean density in the eastern Pacific Ocean, we have built generalized additive models (GAMs) of encounter rate (number of sightings per km) and average school size based on the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's 1986-96 survey data. The survey area encompassed over 25 million sq. km, and the tracklines covered almost 200,000 km. Models ...


Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the ocean -Theoretical and empirical analysis-

2008 New Trends for Environmental Monitoring Using Passive Systems, 2008

We present recent results from several studies and field experiments that were conducted to improve the retrieval of sea surface salinity from space, preparing for the soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) mission. The sea surface roughness impact on L-band emissivity is analysed based on the data from the CoSMOS airborne campaign conducted in April 2006 in the Norway sea. ...


Least square algorithm for sea surface salinity retrieving from MODIS satellite data

2009 IEEE International Conference on Signal and Image Processing Applications, 2009

This paper presents a new approach for retrieving sea surface salinity (SSS) from MODIS satellite data. In doing so, the least squares method is used which is based on the hypothesis of linearity between visual bands and the real sea surface salinity. The study shows that offshore sea surface salinity tends to be homogenous with SSS value of 33.8 psu. ...


A simple algorithm for sea surface salinity retrieval from L-band radiometric measurements at nadir

IGARSS 2003. 2003 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. Proceedings (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37477), 2003

The small slope approximation (SSA) theory is applied to the prediction of the foam-free sea surface brightness temperatures at L-band and nadir incidence angle. If surface geometry is assumed to be Gaussian, the wind induced polarized brightness temperature signals are integral functions of the product of the directional curvature spectrum harmonics and electromagnetic weighting functions. At nadir incidence angle, these ...


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Educational Resources on Sea surface salinity

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Satellite Observed Hotspot in the Pacific Ocean

    None

  • Advances in density and abundance estimation for cetaceans using geospatial modeling

    To identify and quantify spatial patterns in cetacean density in the eastern Pacific Ocean, we have built generalized additive models (GAMs) of encounter rate (number of sightings per km) and average school size based on the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's 1986-96 survey data. The survey area encompassed over 25 million sq. km, and the tracklines covered almost 200,000 km. Models were constructed using stepwise selection of predictor variables, including time-invariant geographic variables (latitude, longitude, offshore distance, ocean depth, slope of the ocean floor) and temporally dynamic oceanographic and biological variables (sea surface temperature, gradient in sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, thermocline depth, thermocline strength, depth of the euphotic zone, and chlorophyll concentration). We built separate models to describe the northern and southern regions of our study area for each of the following eight species or species groups: blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, n= 98 sightings), fin whale (B. physalus, n=44), sei and Bryde 's whales (B. borealis and B. edeni, respectively; n=99 sightings total), sperm whale (Physetermacrocephalus, n=165), dwarf and pygmy sperm whales (Kogia sima and K. breviceps, respectively; n=89 sightings total), Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris, n=99), beaked whales of the genus Mesoplodon (n=94), and delphinids (n=2413). One variable that factored prominently into the analysis was sea surface temperature, which was correlated with the encounter rates of delphinids and sei/Bryde's whales, and with the school sizes of delphinids, sperm whales, blue whales, and sei/ Bryde's whales. In addition, thermocline characteristics helped explain observed patterns in the encounter rates of delphinids and blue whales, and the school sizes of Cuvier's beaked whales and sei/Bryde's whales.

  • Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the ocean -Theoretical and empirical analysis-

    We present recent results from several studies and field experiments that were conducted to improve the retrieval of sea surface salinity from space, preparing for the soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) mission. The sea surface roughness impact on L-band emissivity is analysed based on the data from the CoSMOS airborne campaign conducted in April 2006 in the Norway sea. Comparisons with electromagnetic scattering models used in SMOS algorithm indicate likely overestimation in the sea surface spectrum model energies at decimetric surface wave scales.

  • Least square algorithm for sea surface salinity retrieving from MODIS satellite data

    This paper presents a new approach for retrieving sea surface salinity (SSS) from MODIS satellite data. In doing so, the least squares method is used which is based on the hypothesis of linearity between visual bands and the real sea surface salinity. The study shows that offshore sea surface salinity tends to be homogenous with SSS value of 33.8 psu. Onshore SSS variation, however, has irregular pattern as compared with offshore SSS that is ranged between 28.5 and 29.5 psu. The results also show a good correlation between in situ SSS measurements and the SSS that is retrieved from MODIS satellite data with high r2of 0.96. In conclusion, the least squares method can be used to provide a new algorithm for SSS retrieval from MODIS satellite data with RMS of bias value of ±0.37 psu.

  • A simple algorithm for sea surface salinity retrieval from L-band radiometric measurements at nadir

    The small slope approximation (SSA) theory is applied to the prediction of the foam-free sea surface brightness temperatures at L-band and nadir incidence angle. If surface geometry is assumed to be Gaussian, the wind induced polarized brightness temperature signals are integral functions of the product of the directional curvature spectrum harmonics and electromagnetic weighting functions. At nadir incidence angle, these electromagnetic weighting functions are equals in magnitude for horizontal and vertical polarization and exhibit peaky distribution as function of wavenumber. Using these properties together with azimuthal characteristics of the directional curvature spectrum at L-band, the combination of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperature signals at normal incidence is shown to form a simple linear equation of the dielectric constant, the SST and the wind direction. A simple analytical inversion algorithm is proposed to retrieve the Sea Surface Salinity without a priori knowledge of the wind speed using the previously established dependence.

  • Sun glint and sea surface salinity remote sensing

    The Aquarius/SAC-D mission will employ three L-band (1.41 GHz) radiometers dedicated to remote sensing of sea surface salinity. The mission will be in a dawn/dusk sun- synchronous orbit with the beam oriented toward the night time side of the orbit in order to limit interference from the Sun. The effect of surface roughness on solar radiation reflected from the surface will be examined. It will be shown that including the small scale roughness (waves) can have a major impact. Also, it will be shown that when the small scale waves are included it is possible to have significant radiation reflected into the main beam during seasonal extremes when a portion of the main beam is on the illuminated side of day-night terminator.

  • Salinity Gradients in Coastal Waters by Airborne Microwave Radiometer Remote Sensing

    A project was proposed, and funded, to use the airborne polarimetric L-band multi-beam radiometer (PLMR) to observe salinity gradients across the continental shelf in order to evaluate the cross-shelf mixing and residence time for water in the Great Barrier Reef. This paper examines issues of accuracy and uses first results from the project to demonstrate that the PLMR is capable of observing salinity gradients of the order of 0.01 PSU per km.

  • Vertical variability of Sea Surface Salinity and influence on L-band brightness temperature

    In preparation for SMOS Cal/Val phase, we simulate SMOS retrieved data (first cm) from in situ data (a few meters depth). We study vertical gradients of salinity in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean with three types of data: TSG and XCTD measurements from boats (POLARSTERN and ARAMIS project) and from ARGO floats. Between 0 and 10degnorth, nearly 5% of vertical gradients between 5 and 10 m are larger than 0.1 psu. They appeared in a zone characterized by warm SST and low wind and are linked to rain events or river discharges. The mean value of all the data stays less than 0.02 psu. However their distribution is skewed towards positives values, implying a non Gaussian repartition of differences between SMOS and in situ data.

  • L-band sea surface emissivity radiometric observations under high winds: Preliminary results of the Wind and Salinity Experiment WISE-2001

    The WISE 2000 and WISE 2001 field campaigns were sponsored by ESA to gather experimental data to improve the knowledge of the L-band brightness temperature dependence with wind speed at different incidence angles and azimuth angles. The goal is to help the development of sea surface salinity retrieval algorithms for SMOS Earth Explorer Mission of the European Space Agency. The L-band AUtomatic RAdiometer (LAURA) plus other sensors to characterize the sea surface state were installed at the Casablanca oil rig, 40 km south east off the coast of Tarragona in Spain. During WISE 2000 wind conditions were low-to-moderate, but during WISE 2001 two strong storms beat the Catalonian coast with sustained winds higher than 100 km/h at the platform meteorological station (69 m height). The first results of the radiometric measurements (azimuth and elevation scans) acquired with LAURA during the WInd and Salinity Experiment (WISE-2001) are presented.

  • Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval Throughout a SMOS Half-Orbit Using Neural Networks

    This article explains the way to resolve one of the main difficulties of using neural networks to retrieve the ocean salinity from SMOS observations. By designing a set of networks which inputs are adapted to the variability of SMOS incidence angles, we are able to process practically any point on the ocean surface



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