Conferences related to Sea surface

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OCEANS 2020 - SINGAPORE

An OCEANS conference is a major forum for scientists, engineers, and end-users throughout the world to present and discuss the latest research results, ideas, developments, and applications in all areas of oceanic science and engineering. Each conference has a specific theme chosen by the conference technical program committee. All papers presented at the conference are subsequently archived in the IEEE Xplore online database. The OCEANS conference comprises a scientific program with oral and poster presentations, and a state of the art exhibition in the field of ocean engineering and marine technology. In addition, each conference can have tutorials, workshops, panel discussions, technical tours, awards ceremonies, receptions, and other professional and social activities.

  • OCEANS 2005 - EUROPE

  • OCEANS 2006 - ASIA PACIFIC

  • OCEANS 2007 - EUROPE

    The theme 'Marine Challenges: Coastline to Deep Sea' focuses on the significant challenges, from the shallowest waters around our coasts to the deepest subsea trenches, that face marine, subsea and oceanic engineers in their drive to understand the complexities of the world's oceans.

  • OCEANS 2008 - MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Ocean

  • OCEANS 2009 - EUROPE

  • OCEANS 2010 IEEE - Sydney

  • OCEANS 2011 - SPAIN

    All Oceans related technologies.

  • OCEANS 2012 - YEOSU

    The OCEANS conferences covers four days with tutorials, exhibits and three days of parallel tracks that address all aspects of oceanic engineering.

  • OCEANS 2013 - NORWAY

    Ocean related technologies. Program includes tutorials, three days of technical papers and a concurrent exhibition. Student poster competition.

  • OCEANS 2014 - TAIPEI

    The OCEANS conference covers all aspects of ocean engineering from physics aspects through development and operation of undersea vehicles and equipment.

  • OCEANS 2015 - Genova

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Society of IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 50-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2016 - Shanghai

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorial on ocean technology, workshops and town hall meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2017 - Aberdeen

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town hall meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • 2018 OCEANS - MTS/IEEE Kobe Techno-Ocean (OTO)

    The conference scope is to provide a thematic umbrella for researchers working in OCEAN engineering and related fields across the world to discuss the problems and potential long term solutions that concernnot only the oceans in Asian pacific region, but the world ocean in general.

  • OCEANS 2019 - Marseille

    Research, Development, and Operations pertaining to the Oceans


Oceans 2020 MTS/IEEE GULF COAST

To promote awareness, understanding, advancement and application of ocean engineering and marine technology. This includes all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

  • OCEANS '96

  • OCEANS '97

  • OCEANS '98

  • OCEANS '99

  • OCEANS 2000

  • OCEANS 2001

  • OCEANS 2002

  • OCEANS 2003

  • OCEANS 2004

  • OCEANS 2005

  • OCEANS 2006

  • OCEANS 2007

  • OCEANS 2008

    The Marine Technology Society (MTS) and the Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) cosponsor a joint conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, education, and policy. Held annually in the fall, it has become a focal point for the ocean and marine community to meet, learn, and exhibit products and services. The conference includes technical sessions, workshops, student poster sessions, job fairs, tutorials and a large exhibit.

  • OCEANS 2009

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2016

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2017 - Anchorage

    Papers on ocean technology, exhibits from ocean equipment and service suppliers, student posters and student poster competition, tutorials on ocean technology, workshops and town meetings on policy and governmental process.

  • OCEANS 2018 MTS/IEEE Charleston

    Ocean, coastal, and atmospheric science and technology advances and applications


2020 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC)

The Conference focuses on all aspects of instrumentation and measurement science andtechnology research development and applications. The list of program topics includes but isnot limited to: Measurement Science & Education, Measurement Systems, Measurement DataAcquisition, Measurements of Physical Quantities, and Measurement Applications.


IGARSS 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

All fields of satellite, airborne and ground remote sensing.


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,



Periodicals related to Sea surface

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...



Most published Xplore authors for Sea surface

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Xplore Articles related to Sea surface

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Satellite Observed Hotspot in the Pacific Ocean

IEEE Power Engineering Review, 1992

None


Semi-automated Maltese front position determination

Proceedings. Fourteenth International Conference on Pattern Recognition (Cat. No.98EX170), 1998

The authors investigate the reliability of a semi-automated system designed to locate the Maltese front from satellite AVHRR and SAR imagery. The opening and closing operations of mathematical morphology afford a means of image segmentation that provides smooth, strong, continuous edges except where the edges are obscured by clouds or similar phenomena. The authors evaluate the results by comparing them ...


Investigations Of The Large-scale Sea Surface Structure And Wave Interactions With Airborne Radiophysical And Optical Instrumentation.

[Proceedings] IGARSS'91 Remote Sensing: Global Monitoring for Earth Management, 1991

None


Advances in density and abundance estimation for cetaceans using geospatial modeling

Oceans 2003. Celebrating the Past ... Teaming Toward the Future (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37492), 2003

To identify and quantify spatial patterns in cetacean density in the eastern Pacific Ocean, we have built generalized additive models (GAMs) of encounter rate (number of sightings per km) and average school size based on the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's 1986-96 survey data. The survey area encompassed over 25 million sq. km, and the tracklines covered almost 200,000 km. Models ...


Passive Microwave Measurements Of Sea Surface Roughness During The Saxon Experiment

12th Canadian Symposium on Remote Sensing Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium,, 1989

None



Educational Resources on Sea surface

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Satellite Observed Hotspot in the Pacific Ocean

    None

  • Semi-automated Maltese front position determination

    The authors investigate the reliability of a semi-automated system designed to locate the Maltese front from satellite AVHRR and SAR imagery. The opening and closing operations of mathematical morphology afford a means of image segmentation that provides smooth, strong, continuous edges except where the edges are obscured by clouds or similar phenomena. The authors evaluate the results by comparing them with front positions found by experienced Navy analysts. Their system provides an objective method for front location that is less labor-intensive than manual methods currently in use.

  • Investigations Of The Large-scale Sea Surface Structure And Wave Interactions With Airborne Radiophysical And Optical Instrumentation.

    None

  • Advances in density and abundance estimation for cetaceans using geospatial modeling

    To identify and quantify spatial patterns in cetacean density in the eastern Pacific Ocean, we have built generalized additive models (GAMs) of encounter rate (number of sightings per km) and average school size based on the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's 1986-96 survey data. The survey area encompassed over 25 million sq. km, and the tracklines covered almost 200,000 km. Models were constructed using stepwise selection of predictor variables, including time-invariant geographic variables (latitude, longitude, offshore distance, ocean depth, slope of the ocean floor) and temporally dynamic oceanographic and biological variables (sea surface temperature, gradient in sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, thermocline depth, thermocline strength, depth of the euphotic zone, and chlorophyll concentration). We built separate models to describe the northern and southern regions of our study area for each of the following eight species or species groups: blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, n= 98 sightings), fin whale (B. physalus, n=44), sei and Bryde 's whales (B. borealis and B. edeni, respectively; n=99 sightings total), sperm whale (Physetermacrocephalus, n=165), dwarf and pygmy sperm whales (Kogia sima and K. breviceps, respectively; n=89 sightings total), Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris, n=99), beaked whales of the genus Mesoplodon (n=94), and delphinids (n=2413). One variable that factored prominently into the analysis was sea surface temperature, which was correlated with the encounter rates of delphinids and sei/Bryde's whales, and with the school sizes of delphinids, sperm whales, blue whales, and sei/ Bryde's whales. In addition, thermocline characteristics helped explain observed patterns in the encounter rates of delphinids and blue whales, and the school sizes of Cuvier's beaked whales and sei/Bryde's whales.

  • Passive Microwave Measurements Of Sea Surface Roughness During The Saxon Experiment

    None

  • Influence of sea surface roughness on electromagnetic waves propagation in presence of evaporation duct

    This paper deals with effects of sea surface roughness and wind direction on electromagnetic waves propagation in presence of evaporation duct. The Parabolic Equation method is used to solve the wave equation above a generated random sea surface which furthermore takes into account a roughness parameter. The wind direction influence on propagation is presented with numerical results of EM wave propagation.

  • Cross Sections And Modulation Transfer Functions At L- And Ku-bands Measured During The Toward Experiment

    None

  • Remote ocean surface current measurement

    None

  • Two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors

    Calculations of attainable values for space resolution and radiometric sensibility of a spaceborne two-dimensional synthetic aperture microwave polarimetric interferometer are carried out. It is shown that for the most preferable Y-shaped interferometer configuration, it is possible to achieve (within the transparency windows of waveband 3–22.5 mm) a space resolution of 0.5–1 km and a radiometric resolution close to 1 K at the receiver bandwidth of 100 MHz. For cross- and T-shaped resolutions, values close to the above can be reached.

  • Modeling Sun Glitter at L-Band for Sea Surface Salinity Remote Sensing With SMOS

    Since the sun is an extremely strong radiation source at L-band, accounting for sun glint over the ocean, i.e., solar radiation reflected by the sea surface toward downward-looking radiometers, raises a significant challenge for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. This paper describes a dedicated physical model for sun glint at L-band frequencies and provides quantitative and qualitative estimates of the sun glint contamination impinging the antenna of the Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis interferometer onboard the future European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The sun brightness temperature expected during the mission period is first estimated from past solar flux data with an expected range of to about . Numerical simulations of the predicted illumination of the SMOS antenna by solar radiation scattered by the rough sea surface are then performed at key dates of the seasonal cycle using different asymptotic scattering models and several representative surface conditions. Although the center of the sun's glitter pattern will never be located within the useful part of SMOS' synthesized field of view, the expected contamination due to roughness scattering will range between 0 K and about 500 K, depending on the target position, the season period, the roughness state at the target, and the level of solar activity at the time of measurements. In particular, we find the sun glint contamination to be more intense when SMOS will probe ocean surfaces in the Southern Hemisphere, reaching maxima in descending passes with highest values expected at dates around winter solstices.



Standards related to Sea surface

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No standards are currently tagged "Sea surface"