Magnetosphere

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A magnetosphere is formed when a stream of charged particles, such as the solar wind, interacts with and is deflected by the intrinsic magnetic field of a planet or similar body. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Magnetosphere

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Magnetic Conference (INTERMAG)

INTERMAG is the premier conference on all aspects of applied magnetism and provides a range of oral and poster presentations, invited talks and symposia, a tutorial session, and exhibits reviewing the latest developments in magnetism.


2019 20th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems & Eurosensors XXXIII (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXXIII)

The world's premiere conference in MEMS sensors, actuators and integrated micro and nano systems welcomes you to attend this four-day event showcasing major technological, scientific and commercial breakthroughs in mechanical, optical, chemical and biological devices and systems using micro and nanotechnology.The major areas of activity in the development of Transducers solicited and expected at this conference include but are not limited to: Bio, Medical, Chemical, and Micro Total Analysis Systems Fabrication and Packaging Mechanical and Physical Sensors Materials and Characterization Design, Simulation and Theory Actuators Optical MEMS RF MEMS Nanotechnology Energy and Power


2019 44th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz)

Science, technology and applications spanning the millimeter-waves, terahertz and infrared spectral regions


2019 9th International Conference on Recent Advances in Space Technologies (RAST)

RAST 2019 aims providing a forum for the presentation and reviw of recentdevelopments in the space technologies, especially in the Space for the Sustainable Development Goals.


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Periodicals related to Magnetosphere

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.


Industrial Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

Theory and applications of industrial electronics and control instrumentation science and engineering, including microprocessor control systems, high-power controls, process control, programmable controllers, numerical and program control systems, flow meters, and identification systems.


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Most published Xplore authors for Magnetosphere

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Xplore Articles related to Magnetosphere

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Using quasi-linear diffusion to model acceleration and loss from wave-particle interactions

Space Weather, 2004

Current research has reemphasized the importance of cyclotron resonant wave particle interactions for radiation belt electrons. Whistler mode hiss, chorus, and EMIC waves can act in combination to cause acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons at greater rates than previously appreciated. These processes can be described by quasi-linear theory, but calculating quasi-linear diffusion coefficients is computationally demanding. Recent advances ...


A framework for next-generation radiation belt models

Space Weather, 2005

The trapped radiation specifications, such as AE-8 and AP-8, are based upon a simple and reasonable framework that happens to be insufficient to the modern demands placed upon them. This manuscript outlines an improved framework for the next generation of radiation models. While existing radiation specifications tend to provide mean fluxes on a grid in magnetic coordinates, scientific and engineering ...


Why Kp is such a good measure of magnetospheric convection

Space Weather, 2004

The 3-hour magnetic activity index, Kp, is widely used for measuring the level of magnetospheric activity, and many magnetospheric properties are known to correlate with it. The common denominator for these different properties is the strength of the magnetospheric convection electric field, the large-scale electric field imposed across the magnetosphere by the flow of the magnetized solar wind past the ...


On The Role Of Laboratory Plasmas For Space Research--a Case Study--Alfven Successive Wave Heating Of A Two-ion Species Mirror Plasma

IEEE Conference Record - Abstracts. 1991 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 1991

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Operational models and drag-derived density trends in the thermosphere

Space Weather, 2011

Improvements in knowledge of satellite drag coefficients confirm current reports of a long-term decline in thermospheric density. Operational thermospheric models, though highly sophisticated, did not predict the extent of the decline, posing a problem for orbit control and maintenance. Evidence is presented that current models could not predict the magnitude of the decline for two reasons: (1) they do not ...


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Educational Resources on Magnetosphere

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IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Using quasi-linear diffusion to model acceleration and loss from wave-particle interactions

    Current research has reemphasized the importance of cyclotron resonant wave particle interactions for radiation belt electrons. Whistler mode hiss, chorus, and EMIC waves can act in combination to cause acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons at greater rates than previously appreciated. These processes can be described by quasi-linear theory, but calculating quasi-linear diffusion coefficients is computationally demanding. Recent advances have been made in computing bounce averaged quasi-linear pitch angle, energy, and mixed diffusion coefficients for hiss and EMIC in the high density plasmasphere; this paper outlines generalization of these techniques for chorus waves, prevalent in the low density region outside the plasmasphere. These coefficients are associated with a two-dimensional diffusion equation whose numerical solution by finite differencing methods requires care, for reasons having to do with the relation between the mixed and other diffusion coefficients, as discussed.

  • A framework for next-generation radiation belt models

    The trapped radiation specifications, such as AE-8 and AP-8, are based upon a simple and reasonable framework that happens to be insufficient to the modern demands placed upon them. This manuscript outlines an improved framework for the next generation of radiation models. While existing radiation specifications tend to provide mean fluxes on a grid in magnetic coordinates, scientific and engineering users are starting to demand capabilities that are far beyond this simple framework, such as error bars on total mission dose and real-time data assimilation. One framework that can provide these added capabilities while still remaining fairly simple is the joint probability distribution, described here. The joint distribution can describe the behavior of individual fluxes on a grid in magnetic coordinates while also describing how those fluxes vary together. This covariance is a crucial ingredient for data assimilation and for proper error bars and percentiles on composite quantities like dose or fluence to a shielded device. This manuscript describes the core math of the proposed framework, an approach to building the model from in situ observations and/or numerical simulations, how to use the model to calculate error bars and percentiles on composite quantities, how to use the model in data assimilation, and how to make a first estimate of the dependence of worst case fluences on aggregation time.

  • Why Kp is such a good measure of magnetospheric convection

    The 3-hour magnetic activity index, Kp, is widely used for measuring the level of magnetospheric activity, and many magnetospheric properties are known to correlate with it. The common denominator for these different properties is the strength of the magnetospheric convection electric field, the large-scale electric field imposed across the magnetosphere by the flow of the magnetized solar wind past the Earth. While the relationship between Kp and the global convection field has long been known, the question of why the relationship exists has apparently not been addressed. In this report, it is proposed that because Kp is derived from magnetic variations obtained at subauroral stations, it is extremely sensitive to the latitudinal distance to the equatorial edge of the auroral region, where the principal causative currents flow. Since the auroral region maps to the plasma sheet in the magnetosphere, motion of the inner edge of the plasma sheet, which is determined by the strength of the convection field, causes significant changes in Kp. Thus, through its dependence on the latitude of the auroral current region, Kp can be viewed as a direct monitor of the strength of magnetospheric convection, explaining the success of previous Kp-dependent models of the global electric field.

  • On The Role Of Laboratory Plasmas For Space Research--a Case Study--Alfven Successive Wave Heating Of A Two-ion Species Mirror Plasma

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  • Operational models and drag-derived density trends in the thermosphere

    Improvements in knowledge of satellite drag coefficients confirm current reports of a long-term decline in thermospheric density. Operational thermospheric models, though highly sophisticated, did not predict the extent of the decline, posing a problem for orbit control and maintenance. Evidence is presented that current models could not predict the magnitude of the decline for two reasons: (1) they do not realistically describe the highly variable energy entering the thermosphere from the solar wind at all times, especially at geomagnetically quiet times, and (2) they overestimate the less volatile ultraviolet contribution by ignoring eddy diffusion which transfers energy from the thermosphere to the mesosphere. The historical background of operational thermospheric models and suggestions for improvement are provided.

  • Inclined Zenith Aurora over Kyoto on 17 September 1770: Graphical evidence of extreme magnetic storm

    Red auroras were observed in Japan during an extreme magnetic storm that occurred on 17 September 1770. We show new evidence that the red aurora extended toward the zenith of Kyoto around midnight. The basic appearance of the historical painting of the red aurora is geometrically reproduced based on the inclination of the local magnetic field and a detailed description in a newly discovered diary. The presence of the inclined zenith aurora over Kyoto suggests that the intensity of the September 1770 magnetic storm is comparable to, or slightly larger than that of the September 1859 Carrington storm.

  • Global-scale Simulation Of The Earth's Magnetosphere Using A Hybrid Code

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  • Bremsstrahlung effects in energetic particle detectors

    The energetic charged particles of the Earth's magnetosphere are routinely detected by solid-state satellite instruments. Quantitative data are increasingly required for engineering dose calculations and for space weather science. However, the design of some energetic particle detectors can be severely constrained. Background effects must be accurately modeled in such cases to extract quantitative information. In particular, bremsstrahlung radiation from electrons impacting the detector and the satellite often dominates the background noise. Numerical tools are presented here to calculate total bremsstrahlung effects in energetic electron detectors. The calculations are illustrated for the low-energy particle detector of current Global Positioning System satellites.

  • Growth Of Resistive Wall Modes In An RPF

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  • Charge exchange pumping in the vacuum ultraviolet

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