IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

View this topic in
IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking is a scientific journal that focuses on communication networks. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

No conferences are currently tagged "IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking"


Periodicals related to IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Networking, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Network architecture and design, communication protocols, network software, network technologies, network software, network technologies, network services and applications, and network operations and management.



Most published Xplore authors for IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

Distributed channel allocation for PCN with variable rate traffic

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 1997

We consider the design of efficient channel allocation algorithms in personal communication networks (PCN) where the cells have varying traffic loads. A common communication channel is to be dynamically shared between the cells. We propose a distributed intercell channel allocation policy that is easy to implement through the use of simple signaling between neighboring cells. For cells arranged in a ...


ASHs: application-specific handlers for high-performance messaging

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 1997

Application-specific safe message handlers (ASHs) are designed to provide applications with hardware-level network performance. ASHs are user-written code fragments that safely and efficiently execute in the kernel in response to message arrival. ASHs can direct message transfers (thereby eliminating copies) and send messages (thereby reducing send-response latency). In addition, the ASH system provides support for dynamic integrated layer processing (thereby ...


An analytical paradigm to compare routing strategies in an ATM multimedia environment

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 1997

We propose an analytical model for the study of two different routing strategies in an ATM network supporting multimedia traffic flow: the multimedia virtual circuit (MVC) and the independent virtual circuit (IVC). The first strategy consists of assigning a single virtual channel to all of the monomedia streams which make up the multimedia flows; the second strategy consists of multiplexing ...


Computational Analysis and Efficient Algorithms for Micro and Macro OFDMA Downlink Scheduling

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2010

Orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) is one of the most important modulation and access methods for the future mobile networks. Before transmitting a frame on the downlink, an OFDMA base station has to invoke an algorithm that determines which of the pending packets will be transmitted, what modulation should be used for each of them, and how to construct the ...


Scaling Laws for Data-Centric Storage and Querying in Wireless Sensor Networks

IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 2009

We use a constrained optimization framework to derive scaling laws for data- centric storage and querying in wireless sensor networks. We consider both unstructured sensor networks, which use blind sequential search for querying, and structured sensor networks, which use efficient hash-based querying. We find that the scalability of a sensor network's performance depends upon whether the increase in energy and ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Distributed channel allocation for PCN with variable rate traffic

    We consider the design of efficient channel allocation algorithms in personal communication networks (PCN) where the cells have varying traffic loads. A common communication channel is to be dynamically shared between the cells. We propose a distributed intercell channel allocation policy that is easy to implement through the use of simple signaling between neighboring cells. For cells arranged in a line, we show that the proposed policy achieves maximum throughput. The same is true when the cells are arranged in a circle and the frequency reuse distance is 2, while for larger reuse distances and planar hexagonal arrays, the policy may not always achieve maximal throughput. For general circular arrays, we enhance the policy to achieve maximal throughput asymptotically as the number of cells increases. For planar hexagonal arrays, we show that the policy can guarantee throughputs which are fairly close to maximal.

  • ASHs: application-specific handlers for high-performance messaging

    Application-specific safe message handlers (ASHs) are designed to provide applications with hardware-level network performance. ASHs are user-written code fragments that safely and efficiently execute in the kernel in response to message arrival. ASHs can direct message transfers (thereby eliminating copies) and send messages (thereby reducing send-response latency). In addition, the ASH system provides support for dynamic integrated layer processing (thereby eliminating duplicate message traversals) and dynamic protocol composition (thereby supporting modularity). ASHs offer this high degree of flexibility while still providing network performance as good as, or (if they exploit application-specific knowledge) even better than, hard-wired in-kernel implementations. A combination of user-level microbenchmarks and end-to-end system measurements using TCP demonstrates the benefits of the ASH system.

  • An analytical paradigm to compare routing strategies in an ATM multimedia environment

    We propose an analytical model for the study of two different routing strategies in an ATM network supporting multimedia traffic flow: the multimedia virtual circuit (MVC) and the independent virtual circuit (IVC). The first strategy consists of assigning a single virtual channel to all of the monomedia streams which make up the multimedia flows; the second strategy consists of multiplexing homogeneous monomedia streams belonging to different multimedia sources on the same virtual channel. With this aim, a multimedia source is modeled as an arrival process defined as the superposition of heterogeneous correlated arrival processes, each of which models one monomedia source. In order to take into account the intermedia relationships which exist in a multimedia stream, each monomedia source is modeled as an interrupted Bernoulli process in which the transition and the arrival probabilities are functions of the states of the other monomedia sources. A finite-buffer discrete-time approach is used in order to compare MVC and IVC performance when an aggregate of N heterogeneous multimedia sources loads the network. Performance is evaluated for each monomedia source in terms of loss probability and jitter probability density function. To assess the proposed paradigm, a case study is shown.

  • Computational Analysis and Efficient Algorithms for Micro and Macro OFDMA Downlink Scheduling

    Orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) is one of the most important modulation and access methods for the future mobile networks. Before transmitting a frame on the downlink, an OFDMA base station has to invoke an algorithm that determines which of the pending packets will be transmitted, what modulation should be used for each of them, and how to construct the complex OFDMA frame matrix as a collection of rectangles that fit into a single matrix with fixed dimensions. We propose efficient algorithms, with performance guarantee, that solve this intricate OFDMA scheduling problem by breaking it down into two subproblems, referred to as macro and micro scheduling. We analyze the computational complexity of these subproblems and develop efficient algorithms for solving them.

  • Scaling Laws for Data-Centric Storage and Querying in Wireless Sensor Networks

    We use a constrained optimization framework to derive scaling laws for data- centric storage and querying in wireless sensor networks. We consider both unstructured sensor networks, which use blind sequential search for querying, and structured sensor networks, which use efficient hash-based querying. We find that the scalability of a sensor network's performance depends upon whether the increase in energy and storage resources with more nodes is outweighed by the concomitant application-specific increase in event and query loads. We derive conditions that determine: 1) whether the energy requirement per node grows without bound with the network size for a fixed-duration deployment, 2) whether there exists a maximum network size that can be operated for a specified duration on a fixed energy budget, and 3) whether the network lifetime increases or decreases with the size of the network for a fixed energy budget. An interesting finding of this work is that three- dimensional (3D) uniform deployments are inherently more scalable than two- dimensional (2D) uniform deployments, which in turn are more scalable than one-dimensional (1D) uniform deployments.

  • Self-termination mechanism for label swapping routing

    In networks that use label swapping routing, like ATM, inconsistent routing tables, due to either incorrect setups or memory failures, may result in infinite looping of packets. This work proposes and analyzes a method for ensuring self-termination in such networks. The method is based on imposing linear order on the labels chosen by the stations along the route during connection setup, and on a simple on-line check performed by every station upon making routing decisions. We then analyze the probability of connection setup failure due to the linear order constraint, and show that it is very small.<<ETX>>

  • Channel access algorithms with active link protection for wireless communication networks with power control

    A distributed power-control algorithm with active link protection (DPC/ALP) is studied in this paper. It maintains the quality of service of operational (active) links above given thresholds at all times (link quality protection). As network congestion builds up, established links sustain their quality, while incoming ones may be blocked and rejected. A suite of admission control algorithms, based on the DPC/ALP one, is also studied. They are distributed/autonomous and operate using local interference measurements. A primarily networking approach to power control is taken here, based on the concept of active link protection, which naturally supports the implementation of admission control. Extensive simulation experiments are used to explore the network dynamics and investigate basic operational effects/tradeoffs related to system performance.

  • Resource sharing for book-ahead and instantaneous-request calls

    In order to provide an adequate quality of service to large-bandwidth calls, such as video conference calls, service providers of integrated services networks may want to allow some customers to book their calls ahead, i.e., make advance reservations. We propose a scheme for sharing resources among book-ahead (BA) calls (that announce their call holding times as well as their call initiation times upon arrival) and non-BA calls (that do not announce their holding times). It is possible to share resources without allowing any calls in progress to be interrupted, but in order to achieve a more efficient use of resources, we think that it may be desirable to occasionally allow a call in progress to be interrupted. (In practice, it may be possible to substitute service degradation, such as bit dropping or coarser encoding of video, for interruption.) Thus, we propose an admission control algorithm in which a call is admitted if an approximate interrupt probability (computed in real time) is below a threshold. Simulation experiments show that the proposed admission control algorithm can be better (i.e., yield higher total utilization or higher revenue) than alternative schemes that do not allow interruption, such as a strict partitioning of resources.

  • Flow theory

    We develop a simple theory of flows to study the flow of data in real-time computing networks. Flow theory is based on discrete and nondeterministic mathematics, rather than the customary continuous or probabilistic mathematics. The theory features two types of flows: smooth and uniform, and eight types of flow operators. We prove that, if the input flow to any of these operators is smooth or uniform, then both the internal buffer and delay of that operator are bounded. Linear networks of flow operators are introduced, and their internal buffers and delays are derived from the internal buffers and delays of their constituent operators. We extend flow theory so that it can be used in analyzing cyclic networks and networks of multiflows. Since many rate-reservation protocols can be represented as linear networks of flow operators, we use flow theory to prove that a number of these protocols (stop-and-go, hierarchical round-robin, weighted fair queueing, self-clocking fair queueing, and virtual clock) require bounded buffering and introduce bounded delay.

  • Channel sharing in multi-hop WDM lightwave networks: do we need more channels?

    A local lightwave network can be constructed by employing two-way fibers to connect nodes in a passive-star physical topology, and the available optical bandwidth may be accessed by the nodal transmitters and receivers at electronic rates using wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM). The number of WDM channels, w, in such a network is technology-limited and is less than the number of network nodes, N, especially if the network should support a scalable number of nodes. We describe a general and practical channel sharing method, which requires each node to be equipped with only one transmitter- receiver pair, and in which each WDM channel is shared in a time-division multiplexed fashion; optical fiber LANs are discussed in particular. We also develop a general model for analyzing such a shared-channel, multi-hop, WDM network. Our analysis yields a counterintuitive result: it is sometimes better to employ fewer channels than a larger number of channels. We explore bounds on the ranges of w which admit queueing stability-using too few or too many channels can lead to instability. We also obtain an estimate for the optimal number of channels that minimizes network-wide queueing delay.



Standards related to IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking"


Jobs related to IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking

Back to Top