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Periodicals related to IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Circuits and Systems Magazine, IEEE


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Electrical Insulation Magazine, IEEE

The magazine covers theory, analysis, design (computer-aided design), and practical implementation of circuits, and the application of circuit theoretic techniques to systems and to signal processing. Content is written for the spectrum of activities from basic scientific theory to industrial applications.


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Most published Xplore authors for IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine

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Xplore Articles related to IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine

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U-Health Smart Home

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2011

A new generation of a ubiquitous health smart home is being developed to support the elderly and/or people with chronic diseases in their own home. The goal of the U-Health smart home is to help the elderly to continue to live a more independent life as long as possible in their own home while being monitored and assisted in an ...


The Quiet Revolution of Inorganic Nanowires

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2010

Inorganic materials in the form of thin films are ubiquitous in various applications. In the last two to three decades, the research community and industry have grown thin films of silicon, germanium, III-V compounds, various oxides, nitrides, antimonides, metals, and dielectrics using techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), metal organic CVD (MOCVD), and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). These thin ...


Standards for nanotechnology: what's important

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2009

In the September 2008 issue of IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, I wrote an article discussing why we might not achieve a nanotechnology gold rush without the development of standards. My message was very simple: standards are needed to achieve a high degree of interoperability, create order in the marketplace, simplify production requirements, manage the potential for adverse environmental impacts, and above ...


Emerging Applications of III-Nitride Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: From Deep Ultraviolet and Micro Light Emitters to Artificial Photosynthesis

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, None

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Transistor Laser Integrated Photonics for Optical Logic

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, None

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Educational Resources on IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • U-Health Smart Home

    A new generation of a ubiquitous health smart home is being developed to support the elderly and/or people with chronic diseases in their own home. The goal of the U-Health smart home is to help the elderly to continue to live a more independent life as long as possible in their own home while being monitored and assisted in an unobtrusive manner. This concept of a ubiquitous health care (U-Health) smart home for the elderly has been identified by governments and medical institutions as an important part of the economical, technological, and socially acceptable solution to maintain the health welfare system viable for future generation.

  • The Quiet Revolution of Inorganic Nanowires

    Inorganic materials in the form of thin films are ubiquitous in various applications. In the last two to three decades, the research community and industry have grown thin films of silicon, germanium, III-V compounds, various oxides, nitrides, antimonides, metals, and dielectrics using techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), metal organic CVD (MOCVD), and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). These thin films have directly contributed to all the advances we see today in computers, electronics, optoelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems. Some examples include silicon and its oxide and nitride in logic and memory chips, GaAs and AlGaAs in lasers, and tin oxide thin films in chemical sensors. In the nano era, recent efforts have focused on growing all of the aforementioned materials in the form of one- dimensional (1 -D) nanowires.

  • Standards for nanotechnology: what's important

    In the September 2008 issue of IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, I wrote an article discussing why we might not achieve a nanotechnology gold rush without the development of standards. My message was very simple: standards are needed to achieve a high degree of interoperability, create order in the marketplace, simplify production requirements, manage the potential for adverse environmental impacts, and above all, ensure for the safety and health of those of us who will be developing and using the next generation of materials and devices. Since that article was published, numerous questions were raised as to where our efforts and resources are most needed in the development of standards. The IEEE and other organizations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) have worked together in the area of electronics. However, electronics is only a small piece of the pie.

  • Emerging Applications of III-Nitride Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: From Deep Ultraviolet and Micro Light Emitters to Artificial Photosynthesis

    None

  • Transistor Laser Integrated Photonics for Optical Logic

    None

  • Virtual Learning Environments: How They Can Benefit Nanotechnology Safety Education

    Progress has been made to increase awareness and funding to investigate worker exposure during the nanotechnology production process; however, compliance with widely accepted safety procedures for nanoworkers has yet to be fully realized [7]. The call for further emphasis on this topic was raised by the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (2012) and also in a recent article in IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, in which the author commented that "Even though hazard data exist for many classes of nanomaterials, some of which carry unwanted health effects, there is little focus on the potential for human exposure and on workplace issues? [1]. This article explores the potential of virtual learning environments (VLEs) for nanotechnology safety education and presents a recent research study with implications for nanoeducators (Figure 1).

  • Electrical Properties of an Individual Chicken Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus

    Over the past few years, virus detection techniques have become increasingly important because of the frequent occurrence of new pathogenic virus strains. At present, there are two well-established diagnostic techniques for viruses: immunoassay and DNA-/RNA-based methods. Immunoassay, considered the gold standard, uses either direct immunofluorescent assay or membrane enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to first isolate the virus and then characterize it using serological or other molecular biological tools. Typical drawbacks for immunoassay include poor specificity and low sensitivity. By comparison, DNA -/RNA-based methods such as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays are much more specific and sensitive. These methods, however, are typically very time consuming since the protocol requires a series of DNA/RNA isolation, concentration, and gel electrophoresis.

  • Nanotechnology in Australia--A network of interactions

    This paper present the ARC nanotechnology network looks to enhance the collaboration and information exchange to benefit research productivity for nanotechnology. Australia is a large country-greater in area than the United States-and with a population of only about 20 million people, so interactions over large distances are important. This has been recognized by the government through the Australian Research Council (ARC), which funds nearly all major research in Australia, apart from health and medical research, which has a separate funding organization. In 2004, the ARC established a set of research networks, one of which was the ARC Nanotechnology Network (ARCNN), the objective of which was to enhance collaboration and information exchange in a large variety of fields for the benefit of research productivity. The existence of ARCNN, which is administered from the Australian National University in Canberra, has made possible an overview of what is happening in the field today.

  • Nanolocalized Single-Cell-Membrane Nanoelectroporation: For higher efficiency with high cell viability.

    This article presents a nanolocalized single-cell nanoelectroporation technique, where electroporation takes place in a very precise and localized area on a single cell membrane to achieve highly efficient delivery with high cell viability. A 40-nm triangular indium tin oxide (ITO)-based nanoelectrode tip with a 60-nm gap between two nanoelectrodes, which can intense an electric field in a nanolocalized area of a single cell to permeabilize exogenous biomolecules from outside to inside of the cell, is fabricated. This device successfully delivers dyes and proteins into a single cell with high cell viability (98%). The process not only controls the precise delivery mechanism into the single cell with membrane reversibility but also provides spatial, temporal, and qualitative dosage control, which might be beneficial for therapeutic and biological cell studies.

  • Detect the dots

    This paper presents quantum dots (QDds) and its applications in biomolecular analysis and target detection. Applications include QDs as fluorescent labels, QDs in multiplexed detection in biomolecular analysis, QD-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and single-particle fluorescence coincidence detection. Continuous advances in surface chemistry and synthesis processes of QDs have greatly improved the reliability of QDs for biomolecular assaying. A number of QD-based biomolecular technologies have been validated with actual clinical samples. This great progress has shown that QDs are amenable to clinical applications and will accelerate the translation of these new technologies into clinical settings.



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