Conferences related to Electromagnetics

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2020 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and North American Radio Science Meeting

The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of the art research in the area of antennas and propagation, electromagnetic engineering and radio science


2020 22nd European Conference on Power Electronics and Applications (EPE'20 ECCE Europe)

Energy conversion and conditioning technologies, power electronics, adjustable speed drives and their applications, power electronics for smarter grid, energy efficiency,technologies for sustainable energy systems, converters and power supplies


2020 IEEE 16th International Workshop on Advanced Motion Control (AMC)

AMC2020 is the 16th in a series of biennial international workshops on Advanced Motion Control which aims to bring together researchers from both academia and industry and to promote omnipresent motion control technologies and applications.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Magnetic Conference (INTERMAG)

INTERMAG is the premier conference on all aspects of applied magnetism and provides a range of oral and poster presentations, invited talks and symposia, a tutorial session, and exhibits reviewing the latest developments in magnetism.


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Periodicals related to Electromagnetics

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Methods, algorithms, and human-machine interfaces for physical and logical design, including: planning, synthesis, partitioning, modeling, simulation, layout, verification, testing, and documentation of integrated-circuit and systems designs of all complexities. Practical applications of aids resulting in producible analog, digital, optical, or microwave integrated circuits are emphasized.


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Most published Xplore authors for Electromagnetics

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Xplore Articles related to Electromagnetics

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On the numerically exact integration of singular Galerkin impedance matrix elements in computational electromagnetics

CEM'11 Computational Electromagnetics International Workshop, 2011

Abstract form only given. Surface integral equation (SIE) formulations have reached a workhorse status in computational electromagnetics over the last decades. The numerical solution of Fredholm first and second kind SIEs is typically carried out by means of Galerkin (or Petrov-Galerkin) method of moments discretization schemes. The accuracy and stability of those schemes are strongly dependent on the accurate and ...


Recent Progress in the Mixed Spectral Element Method for Computational Electromagnetics

2018 2nd URSI Atlantic Radio Science Meeting (AT-RASC), 2018

In recent years, the spectral element method (SEM) has been extensively applied to computational electromagnetics for large scale problems. As a special high-order finite element method, however, the SEM also includes DC spurious modes as in the traditional finite element method. Since 2015, the mixed spectral element method has been developed to remove such spurious modes by incorporating Gauss's law ...


Computational quantum electromagnetics: A future pathway for computational electromagnetics

2017 IEEE International Conference on Computational Electromagnetics (ICCEM), 2017

First, we emphasize the importance of Maxwell's equations (1865) [1] which have withstood the test of length scales, special relativity (1905) [2], and quantum theory (1927) [3]. Moreover, a differential geometry description of Maxwell's equations (1945) [4] had inspired the Yang-Mills theory (1954) [5], also known as the generalized electromagnetic theory. Vacuum space consists of electron-positron (e-p) pairs that represent ...


Completeness of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method and its corrective methods in time-domain electromagnetics

2008 IET 7th International Conference on Computation in Electromagnetics, 2008

In this paper, a comparison completeness of the three kernel approximations that are commonly used in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to polynomial functions and their derivatives is conducted. Those are applied for the time domain Maxwell's curl equations and the numerical results is compared with analytic solution. It is shown that the smoothed particle method for Maxwell's equations - smoothed ...


Keynote speaker 1: Computational electromagnetics: Past, present, and future

2015 IEEE International Conference on Computational Electromagnetics, 2015

Electromagnetics and Maxwell's equations have been instrumental in the conception of many electrical engineering technologies. It the beginning, it was telegraphy, and rotating machineries. Over the years, electromagnetics has given rise to numerous technologies like wireless communications, antennas, radar, and masers. On the optics side, simplified ray optics theory was used to design lenses and focusing systems. As many optical ...


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Educational Resources on Electromagnetics

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • On the numerically exact integration of singular Galerkin impedance matrix elements in computational electromagnetics

    Abstract form only given. Surface integral equation (SIE) formulations have reached a workhorse status in computational electromagnetics over the last decades. The numerical solution of Fredholm first and second kind SIEs is typically carried out by means of Galerkin (or Petrov-Galerkin) method of moments discretization schemes. The accuracy and stability of those schemes are strongly dependent on the accurate and efficient computation of the associated impedance matrix elements. In the case of disjoint supports of basis and testing functions, the arising multidimensional integrals are regular, allowing a straightforward numerical integration. Hence, special emphasis is naturally laid upon the most challenging cases that appear when those supports are overlapping or share some common points, thus, giving rise to singular integrals. More specifically, the singular integrals that stem from MoM SIE formulations can be categorized into weakly singular (improper Riemann integrable or 1/R) and strongly singular (Cauchy or 1/R2), provided certain restrictions to both basis and testing functions. We will present our latest advances on the fast and accurate integration of the above mentioned 4-D singular integrals for both div-conforming and curl-conforming testing functions over triangular tessellations. The numerical experiments have been undertaken on Matlab and C++ platforms with double precision arithmetic, while the reference values obtained with high precision arithmetic exhibit smooth convergence beyond 16 significant digits. As it will be clearly demonstrated by the results, the proposed method leads to exponential convergence both for 1/R and 1/R2singularities with the accuracy being limited only by the incidental presence of error propagation effects in the numerical integration of sufficiently smooth functions. In any case, the results converge to a minimum of 13 significant digits (for most of the cases close to machine precision) with unmatched efficiency, thus allowing a safe shift of future research studies on other aspects of surface integral equation formulations.

  • Recent Progress in the Mixed Spectral Element Method for Computational Electromagnetics

    In recent years, the spectral element method (SEM) has been extensively applied to computational electromagnetics for large scale problems. As a special high-order finite element method, however, the SEM also includes DC spurious modes as in the traditional finite element method. Since 2015, the mixed spectral element method has been developed to remove such spurious modes by incorporating Gauss's law into the traditional SEM (N. Liu, L. Tobon, Y. Tang, Q. H. Liu, “Mixed Spectral Element Method for 2D Maxwell Eigenvalue Problem,” Communications in Computational Physics, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 458-486, 2015; N. Liu, L. Tobon, Y. Zhao, Y. Tang, Q. H. Liu, “Mixed Spectral Element Method for 3-D Maxwell Eigenvalue Problem,” IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 317-325, 2015).

  • Computational quantum electromagnetics: A future pathway for computational electromagnetics

    First, we emphasize the importance of Maxwell's equations (1865) [1] which have withstood the test of length scales, special relativity (1905) [2], and quantum theory (1927) [3]. Moreover, a differential geometry description of Maxwell's equations (1945) [4] had inspired the Yang-Mills theory (1954) [5], also known as the generalized electromagnetic theory. Vacuum space consists of electron-positron (e-p) pairs that represent nothingness. But when an electromagnetic wave passes through vacuum, the e-p pairs are polarized to form simple harmonic oscillators. The propagation of electromagnetic waves through vacuum is due to the coupling of these simple harmonic oscillators [6]. Figure 1 shows the concept of coupled harmonic oscillators: As more oscillators are coupled together, more resonant frequencies are possible in the system. A continuum of coupled harmonic oscillator (a transmission line) has infinitely many resonant modes. A cavity is a 3D version of a 1D transmission line. The field in a cavity can be decomposed into sum of modes, each of which resonate like a LC tank circuit as shown in Figure 2. Since each of these modes behaves simply like a harmonic oscillator, it can be quantized. From this concept of coupled harmonic oscillators, the quantum Maxwell's equations are derived to be: ∇ × Ĥ(r, t) - ∂tD(r, t) = Ĵext(r, t), ∇ Ê(r, t) + ∂tB(r, t) = 0, (1) ∇ · D(r, t) = ρext(r, t), ∇ ·.B(r, t) = 0. (2) The Green's function technique applies when the quantum system is linear time invariant. Hence, past knowledge in computational electromagnetics can be invoked to arrive at these Green's functions. These quantum Maxwell's equations portend well for a better understanding of quantum effects that are observed in many branches of electromagnetics, as well as in quantum optics, quantum information, communication, computing, encryption and related fields. More details about this work can be found in [7-11]. Hence, the combination of computational electromagnetics with quantum theory is cogent for the development of computational quantum optics. In this talk, a new look at the quantization of electromagnetic field will be presented. Examples of field- atom interaction using semi-classical calculation as well as fully quantum calculation will be presented as shown in Figure 3. Connection with computational electromagnetics in these calculations will be pointed out. The use of computational electromagnetics for Casimir force calculation will also be illustrated.

  • Completeness of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method and its corrective methods in time-domain electromagnetics

    In this paper, a comparison completeness of the three kernel approximations that are commonly used in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to polynomial functions and their derivatives is conducted. Those are applied for the time domain Maxwell's curl equations and the numerical results is compared with analytic solution. It is shown that the smoothed particle method for Maxwell's equations - smoothed particle electromagnetics (SPEM) - has a high potential in computational electromagnetics and nanostructure.

  • Keynote speaker 1: Computational electromagnetics: Past, present, and future

    Electromagnetics and Maxwell's equations have been instrumental in the conception of many electrical engineering technologies. It the beginning, it was telegraphy, and rotating machineries. Over the years, electromagnetics has given rise to numerous technologies like wireless communications, antennas, radar, and masers. On the optics side, simplified ray optics theory was used to design lenses and focusing systems. As many optical systems can be described by ray optics approximations, the first area that requires the full solution of Maxwell's equations is in microwave engineering, antenna design, and remote and subsurface sensing. Hence, there were pressing needs to design better antenna systems for communication, radar for target identification, and radio waves for remote sensing. While closed form solutions offered some physics insight, approximate solutions were invoked to further expand the insight of designers and engineers. When approximation solutions were exhausted, numerical methods or computational electromagnetics (CEM) were developed to further aid designers and engineers. As demand for numerical methods looms, fast and efficient methods of solving Maxwell's equations become a popular topic of research. There are essentially two classes of solvers for Maxwell's equations: differential equation solvers and integral equation solvers. While differential equation solvers use more unknowns than integral equation solvers, they are easy to implement and to maintain. Integral equation solvers, on the other hand, use fewer unknowns, but are more difficult to implement. They also yield dense matrix systems that are expensive to solve and store. However, the advent of fast solvers has greatly expedited their solution efficiency. As of this point, dense matrix systems with over three billion unknowns have been solved using fast solvers. Also, the path to large scale computing requires the use of iterative solvers. Over time, as the demand for CEM solvers grows, more complex structures with a disproportionate number of unknowns need to be solved. They give rise to ill- conditioned matrix systems. Hence, preconditioners or domain decomposition methods are designed to reduce the ill conditioning of matrix system. The preconditioners will greatly expedite iterative solutions to these problems. Maxwell's equations are also intimately related to mathematical geometry and to quantum physics. Differential geometry concepts can be invoked to help in the selection of basis and testing functions in finding the matrix representations of Maxwell operators. Furthermore, even when quantum theory is invoked in the quantization of electromagnetic fields, the fields are still governed by Maxwell's equations. Therefore, solutions of Maxwell's equations are needed even in the quantum regime. Since photons play an important role in the manipulation of quantum information, the solutions of Maxwell's equations will be instrumental even in quantum optics or quantum electromagnetics. They will play an important role in the area of quantum computers and quantum information.

  • Object Oriented Computational Electromagnetics

    Popular numerical techniques for electromagnetic wave modeling can be divided into the frequency-domain and time-domain methods. This paper presents an object oriented modeling framework for building a multiple engine software package. The object-oriented framework captures the essence of most popular electromagnetic wave modeling methods; specialized algorithms can be derived from the existing framework objects

  • The mixed spectral element method: a novel approach to remove zero spurious modes in electromagnetics

    In this paper, we propose a novel mixed spectral element method (mixed SEM) to remove such zero spurious modes and significantly improve the numerical solutions of the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We will demonstrate this mixed SEM with the applications in waveguides and cavities. In order to suppress the zero spurious modes, the divergence-free condition (i.e., Gauss' law) must be enforced in the spectral element. The novel high-order mixed SEM is proposed for the analysis of anisotropic, lossy, and open waveguides and cavities. It utilizes the edge-based curl-conforming Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) polynomials to approximate the tangential vector of the electric field; and for waveguide problems, it uses the nodal-based scalar GLL basis functions to discretize its longitudinal component to obtain the highly accurate simulations.

  • Electromagnetics - ancient and modern

    The paper describes the evolution of electromagnetics and the current state of the art in computational electromagnetics (CEM). After a historical perspective, the impact of electromagnetics (EM) on everyday life and an example of a modem computational modelling method are presented, followed by a brief discussion. It is shown that CEM plays an essential part in advanced technological developments.

  • Adjoint methods for uncertainty quantification in applied computational electromagnetics: FEM scattering examples

    We present methods for quantifying uncertainty and discretization error of numerical electromagnetics solvers based on adjoint operators and duality. We briefly introduce the concept of the adjoint operator and describe applications of adjoint solutions for predicting and analyzing numerical error and approximating sensitivity of a given quantity of interest to a given parameter. Forward solutions are based on the higher order finite element method (FEM).

  • From Computational Electromagnetics to mm-Wave Antennas: Influence of Lot Shafai

    In this paper, we review from personal perspective the influence of Lot Shafai on joint research on Computational Electromagnetics and Antenna Technology by partially retracing research activities over more than 35 years. The early joint research was on the development of analytical and numerical techniques for both direct and inverse scattering. Then our joint research activities have shifted toward antenna design.



Standards related to Electromagnetics

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IEEE Guide for Measurements of Electromagnetic Properties of Earth Media

The purpose of this guide is to describe the measurement principles of the electrical properties of naturally occurring solid materials, although it will also serve as a guide for the measurement of any solid material.


IEEE Recommended Practice for Radar Cross-Section Test Procedures

This recommended practice establishes processes for the measurement of the electromagnetic scattering from objects. It is written for the personnel responsible for the operation of test ranges, and not for the design of such ranges. It recommends procedures for testing and documenting the quality of the measurement system, for calibrating the measurement system, for carrying out the radar scattering measurements, ...


IEEE Standard Definitions of Terms for Radio Wave Propagation

Delete some obsolete terms, add new terms, refine language in some existing terms.


Recommended Practice for an On-site, Ad-Hoc Test Method for Estimating Radiated Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Specific Radio Frequency Transmitters



Jobs related to Electromagnetics

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