Conferences related to Displays

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2020 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and North American Radio Science Meeting

The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of the art research in the area of antennas and propagation, electromagnetic engineering and radio science


2020 19th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems (ITherm)

The ITherm Conference series is the leading international venue for scientific and engineering exploration of thermal, thermomechanical, and emerging technology issues associated with electronic devices, packages, and systems.


2020 IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC)

APEC focuses on the practical and applied aspects of the power electronics business. Not just a power designer’s conference, APEC has something of interest for anyone involved in power electronics including:- Equipment OEMs that use power supplies and converters in their equipment- Designers of power supplies, dc-dc converters, motor drives, uninterruptable power supplies, inverters and any other power electronic circuits, equipments and systems- Manufacturers and suppliers of components and assemblies used in power electronics- Manufacturing, quality and test engineers involved with power electronics equipment- Marketing, sales and anyone involved in the business of power electronic- Compliance engineers testing and qualifying power electronics equipment or equipment that uses power electronics


2020 IEEE Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting is a gathering of experts who work and conduct research in the industrial applications of electrical systems.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


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Periodicals related to Displays

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Advanced Packaging, IEEE Transactions on

The IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging has its focus on the modeling, design, and analysis of advanced electronic, photonic, sensors, and MEMS packaging.


Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on

Broadcast technology, including devices, equipment, techniques, and systems related to broadcast technology, including the production, distribution, transmission, and propagation aspects.


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Most published Xplore authors for Displays

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Xplore Articles related to Displays

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Flexible Reflex displays

2010 23rd Annual Meeting of the IEEE Photonics Society, 2010

Flexible, reflective, bistable displays have become the focus of significant research over the past decade due to their appeal for alternative applications requiring low power, small form factor, and flexibility. Some of the first flexible displays to be offered in the market are non-traditional Reflex™ displays in unique and exciting new applications, such as, writing tablets, electronic skins, and smart ...


Flat-panel displays displace large, heavy, power-hungry CRTs

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

Personal computers, cars, and aircraft are major growing markets for liquid- crystal, electroluminescent, plasma, and vacuum fluorescent displays. However, the displays themselves are limited by technology. It is difficult to make them large enough, with high enough resolution, and with as many shades of color and gray as desired over a wide enough environmental operating range at a cost supportable ...


Advances in interactive, holographic 3D displays

The 15th Annual Meeting of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society, 2002

Reconfigurable computer generated holography - sometimes known as electroholography - is the only technique capable of using computer held data to generate interactive, high quality, 3D images containing all the depth cues used by the human visual system. Practical applications of electroholography require computer generated hologram (CGH) patterns of between 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 10/ pixels to be calculated and ...


Failure analysis of pixel shorting problems in polymer light emitting diode (PLED) displays

2005 IEEE International Reliability Physics Symposium, 2005. Proceedings. 43rd Annual., 2005

A failure analysis process, combining electrical characterization, optical microscopy, SEM/FIB, and other analytical methods, to identify the root cause of pixel shorts in polymer light emitting diode (PLED) displays is presented. Shorted pixels appear black on a full-on white screen, influencing the display uniformity; they could also cause driver problems by drawing excess current. Pixel shorting also poses a reliability ...


Displays for electronic imaging

IEEE Micro, 1998

Electronic displays are seemingly pervasive, but their suitability for digital imaging depends on both underlying technology and end-user application, as this overview of displays indicates.


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Educational Resources on Displays

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Flexible Reflex displays

    Flexible, reflective, bistable displays have become the focus of significant research over the past decade due to their appeal for alternative applications requiring low power, small form factor, and flexibility. Some of the first flexible displays to be offered in the market are non-traditional Reflex™ displays in unique and exciting new applications, such as, writing tablets, electronic skins, and smart card displays (Fig. 1).

  • Flat-panel displays displace large, heavy, power-hungry CRTs

    Personal computers, cars, and aircraft are major growing markets for liquid- crystal, electroluminescent, plasma, and vacuum fluorescent displays. However, the displays themselves are limited by technology. It is difficult to make them large enough, with high enough resolution, and with as many shades of color and gray as desired over a wide enough environmental operating range at a cost supportable in the marketplace. The status and future direction of display technologies are examined. The struggle to lower liquid-crystal display (LCD) cost and the promise of LCD projection systems are discussed.<<ETX>>

  • Advances in interactive, holographic 3D displays

    Reconfigurable computer generated holography - sometimes known as electroholography - is the only technique capable of using computer held data to generate interactive, high quality, 3D images containing all the depth cues used by the human visual system. Practical applications of electroholography require computer generated hologram (CGH) patterns of between 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 10/ pixels to be calculated and displayed at interactive rates. These pixel counts are necessary in order to generate images which are both big enough (upwards of 300 mm width) and possess a large enough field of view (FOV) to permit simultaneous, multiuser viewing. Advances in several key areas may now make such high performance electroholographic systems practical in the near future. We describe CGH design algorithms, computer architectures and CGH display engines, including the Active Tiling/spl trade/ system.

  • Failure analysis of pixel shorting problems in polymer light emitting diode (PLED) displays

    A failure analysis process, combining electrical characterization, optical microscopy, SEM/FIB, and other analytical methods, to identify the root cause of pixel shorts in polymer light emitting diode (PLED) displays is presented. Shorted pixels appear black on a full-on white screen, influencing the display uniformity; they could also cause driver problems by drawing excess current. Pixel shorting also poses a reliability problem, since it can occur after burn-in, during the lifetime of the display. The paper discusses the FA process and identified failure mechanisms.

  • Displays for electronic imaging

    Electronic displays are seemingly pervasive, but their suitability for digital imaging depends on both underlying technology and end-user application, as this overview of displays indicates.

  • Viewable floating displays using simple secondary optical elements

    Two displays that enable the formation of floating images in the air are proposed. A high-refresh-rate monitor and two Fresnel lenses are used in the first demo system to create the real image in the air. The second demo system is composed of a slanted lenticular sheet and multiple semi-transparent mirrors. The floating 3D image can be observed by multiple users simultaneously. The principle and performance of the proposed displays are analyzed in this paper. Two prototypes of the viewable floating displays have been built. The results indicate that the displays are a feasible means of producing the illusion of images with depth.

  • The application of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for the fabrication of fully scanned active matrix flat panel displays

    SOI technology is presently being used for the fabrication of both liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and electroluminescent (EL) displays. It has unique advantages for the fabrication of flat panel displays such as the production of devices with high performance and high breakdown voltage. It is the object of this paper to review the process technologies used in the fabrication of these displays and also to show the latest developments in these technologies.

  • Compressive Light Field Displays

    Light fields are the multiview extension of stereo image pairs: a collection of images showing a 3D scene from slightly different perspectives. Depicting high-resolution light fields usually requires an excessively large display bandwidth; compressive light field displays are enabled by the codesign of optical elements and computational-processing algorithms. Rather than pursuing a direct “optical” solution (for example, adding one more pixel to support the emission of one additional light ray), compressive displays aim to create flexible optical systems that can synthesize a compressed target light field. In effect, each pixel emits a superposition of light rays. Through compression and tailored optical designs, fewer display pixels are necessary to emit a given light field than a direct optical solution would require.

  • Full color flexible displays on thin metal foil with reduced bending radius

    We have developed Full color flexible AM-OLED and AM-EPD displays using a thin metal foil, allowing them to recover their original shape after being bent as well as to produce vivid color images. The key development technologies including a-Si TFT fabrication on thin stainless steel foil and integrated driver electronics in the display panel are described along with improved display performance in a curvature of 5 cm bending radius.

  • Smoke, mirrors, and manufacturable displays

    Most development efforts toward the "ultimate" display technology focus on the initial demonstration, with little consideration of the demo's manufacturability. Efforts to make the product commercially available generally hit tremendous obstacles and die out within a few years. Unfortunately, researchers who build and successfully demonstrate prototypes usually are not aware of the difficulties that arise in bringing them to market. In many cases, these displays remain prototypes and will never make it to become a product. The hard part of a manufacturable solution is the cost: bandwidth, video encoding, circuit design and yield, display uniformity, reliability, and image quality all take their toll. When developing the ultimate display, an organization should focus on the manufacturing pipeline, leveraging its existing capacity to get from demo to product more quickly.



Standards related to Displays

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IEEE Guide for the Application of Human Factors Engineering in the Design of Computer-Based Monitoring and Control Displays for Nuclear Power Generating Stations

This guide provides system design considerations, identifies information display and control techniques for use with computer-based displays, and provides human factors engineering for use of these techniques in specific applications in nuclear power generating stations.


IEEE Guide for the Application of Human Factors Engineering in the Design of Computer-Based Monitoring and Control Displays for Nuclear Power Generating Stations

This guide provides system design considerations, identifies information display and control techniques for use with computer-based displays, and provides human factor engineering guidance for the use of these techniques in nuclear power generating stations.


IEEE Standard Procedures for the Measurement of Electric and Magnetic Fields from Video Display Terminals (VDTs) from 5 Hz to 400 kHz