Conferences related to Defense industry

Back to Top

2020 IEEE 21st International Conference on Vacuum Electronics (IVEC)

Technical presentations will range from the fundamental physics of electron emission and modulated electron beams to the design and operation of devices at UHF to THz frequencies, theory and computational tool development, active and passive components, systems, and supporting technologies.System developers will find that IVEC provides a unique snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in vacuum electron devices. These devices continue to provide unmatched power and performance for advanced electromagnetic systems, particularly in the challenging frequency regimes of millimeter-wave and THz electronics.Plenary talks will provide insights into the history, the broad spectrum of fundamental physics, the scientific issues, and the technological applications driving the current directions in vacuum electronics research.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

The International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) is the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s biggest conference and one of the leading international forums for robotics researchers to present their work.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


2020 IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility & Signal/Power Integrity (EMCSI)

This symposium pertains to the field of electromagnetic compatibility.


2020 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarConf20)

Annual IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2018 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarConf18)

    This conference will be a continuation of the annual IEEE radar series (formerly the IEEE National Radar conference). These conferences cover the many disciplines that span the applications of modern radar systems, including systems-level through subsystem and component technologies, antennas, and signal processing (deterministic and adaptive). The scope includes systems architectures of monostatic, bistatic and multistatic, and ground-based, airborne, shipborne, and spaceborne realizations.

  • 2017 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    This conference will be a continuation of the annual IEEE radar series (formerly the IEEE National Radar conference). These conferences cover the many disciplines that span the applications of modern radar systems. This includes systems-level through subsystem and component technologies, antennas, and signal processing (deterministic and adaptive). The scope includes systems architectures of monostatic, bistatic and multistatic, and ground-based, airborne, and spaceborn realizations.

  • 2016 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    A continuing series of annual RADAR Conferences IEEE-AESS

  • 2015 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    The scope of the IEEE 2015 International Radar Conference includes all aspects of civil and military radar. Topics range from fundamental theory to cutting-edge applications, from signal processing, modeling, simulation to hardware implementation and experimental results.

  • 2014 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    The 2014 IEEE Radar Conference will showcase innovations and developments in radar technology. Topics will include presentations describing developments in radar systems and their implementations, phenomenology, target and clutter modeling, signal processing, component advances, etc.

  • 2013 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    The conference theme is The Arctic The New Frontier as it presents a vast and challenging environment for which radar systems operating in a multi-sensor environment are currently being developed for deployment on space, air, ship and ground platforms and for both remote sensing of the environment and for the monitoring of human activity. It is one of the major challenges and applications being pursued in the field of radar development in Canada.

  • 2012 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    The 2012 IEEE Radar Conference will host 400 to 600 attendees interested in innovations and developments in radar technology. The radar related topics will include presentations describing developments in radar systems and their implementations, phenomenology, target and clutter modeling, component advances, signal processing and data processing utilizing advanced algorithms. The conference will also include exhibits by vendors of radar systems, radar components, instrumentation, related software and publ

  • 2011 IEEE Radar Conference (RadarCon)

    RadarCon11 will feature topics in radar systems, technology, applications, phenomenology,modeling, & signal processing. The conference theme, In the Eye of the Storm, highlights the strong regional interest in radar for severe weather analysis and tracking. Broader implications of the theme reflect global interests such as radar's role in assessing climate change, supporting myriad defense applications, as well as issues with spectrum allocation and management.

  • 2010 IEEE International Radar Conference

    RADAR Systems, RADAR technology

  • 2009 IEEE Radar Conference

    The conference's scope is civil and military radar, including science, technology, and systems. The theme for RADAR '09 is "Radar: From Science to Systems," emphasizing scientific or observational requirements and phenomenology that lead to the systems that we in the radar community develop.

  • 2008 IEEE Radar Conference

    The 2008 IEEE Radar Conference will focus on the key aspects of radar theory and applications as listed below. Exploration of new avenues and methodologies of radar signal processing will also be encouraged. Tutorials will be held in a number of fields of radar technology. The Conference will cover all aspects of radar systems for civil, security and defense applications.

  • 2007 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2006 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2005 IEEE International Radar Conference

  • 2004 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2003 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2002 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2001 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 2000 IEEE International Radar Conference

  • 1999 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 1998 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 1997 IEEE Radar Conference

  • 1996 IEEE Radar Conference


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Defense industry

Back to Top

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on

Broadcast technology, including devices, equipment, techniques, and systems related to broadcast technology, including the production, distribution, transmission, and propagation aspects.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


More Periodicals

Most published Xplore authors for Defense industry

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Defense industry

Back to Top

Competing in a global economy

IEEE Spectrum, 1990

The approaches to global competition adopted by Japan, West Germany, and to the US are examined. In Japan several government institutions assist in developing a strategic vision in science and technology. Foremost is Japan's Council for Science and Technology, which promotes a comprehensive national policy. The Science and Technology Agency (STA), consuming about a quarter of Government R&D, funds research, ...


From swords to plowshares (defense spending)

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

The effects of cutbacks in defense spending on employment are addressed. Issues discussed include early retirement of the 1950's engineering graduates and transfer of skills from defense to civilian work. Past cycles are examined in an attempt to learn some lessons that could be useful today. Suggestions are made as to what individual engineers can do to convert to civilian ...


Reemployment assistance limited

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

The need for defense industry employees to consider what kind of treatment they can expect if they are laid off-or 'redeployed', as some companies call it-is considered. The array of services to laid-off employees include: assistance in preparing resumes, training to improve interviewing skills, and counseling sessions on strategies for job searches. Many also provide a 'job skills center' in ...


Aerospace and defense

IEEE Spectrum, 1990

The challenge facing the European aerospace community after 1992, integrating members' individual capabilities into a decisively unified, noncontentious entity, is addressed. The two stellar examples of European cooperation in this area, the European Space Agency (ESA) and Arianespace SA, which builds and launches the Ariane rockets, are examined. ESA is a consortium of the national space research agencies of 13 ...


Electronics consortia to impact products for generations

IEEE Spectrum, 1990

A growing web of collaborative ventures that has spread throughout electronics R&D establishments in recent years is discussed. The ventures cut across corporate and national boundaries, linking military and civilian organisations, private and public sector concerns, and even corporate rivals that are ordinarily fiercely competitive. The primary reason for the increasing emphasis on collaboration is economics; R&D in the semiconductor ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Defense industry

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Competing in a global economy

    The approaches to global competition adopted by Japan, West Germany, and to the US are examined. In Japan several government institutions assist in developing a strategic vision in science and technology. Foremost is Japan's Council for Science and Technology, which promotes a comprehensive national policy. The Science and Technology Agency (STA), consuming about a quarter of Government R&D, funds research, oversees a worldwide collection of science and engineering publications, and directs a technology transfer corporation. West Germany has developed its R&D policy within a broader European context. Some 12% of the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) budget goes toward international organizations. In the US more than 700 federally funded laboratories spend one-third of the Government's R&D funds and employ more than one-sixth of US scientists and engineers. Issues related to capital costs and to education in all the countries are examined.<<ETX>>

  • From swords to plowshares (defense spending)

    The effects of cutbacks in defense spending on employment are addressed. Issues discussed include early retirement of the 1950's engineering graduates and transfer of skills from defense to civilian work. Past cycles are examined in an attempt to learn some lessons that could be useful today. Suggestions are made as to what individual engineers can do to convert to civilian work.<<ETX>>

  • Reemployment assistance limited

    The need for defense industry employees to consider what kind of treatment they can expect if they are laid off-or 'redeployed', as some companies call it-is considered. The array of services to laid-off employees include: assistance in preparing resumes, training to improve interviewing skills, and counseling sessions on strategies for job searches. Many also provide a 'job skills center' in which employees can make telephone calls and use typewriters or personal computers to write cover letters and print out resumes as well as personal counseling for emotional or family problems due to the layoff. Programs offered by state governments are discussed. The impact of local conditions on reemployment prospects and the option of early retirement for older employees are examined.<<ETX>>

  • Aerospace and defense

    The challenge facing the European aerospace community after 1992, integrating members' individual capabilities into a decisively unified, noncontentious entity, is addressed. The two stellar examples of European cooperation in this area, the European Space Agency (ESA) and Arianespace SA, which builds and launches the Ariane rockets, are examined. ESA is a consortium of the national space research agencies of 13 countries and has overall responsibility for the development of Hermes, France's first manned space vehicle. Arianespace has 52 shareholder companies and research organizations in 11 countries; as the first company of its kind, it has captured more than half the world's commercial spacecraft launch-service business. The aerospace industry's biggest question, namely, what will happen in the defense sector, is discussed, focusing on the restructuring resulting from rising arms costs and changing political realities.<<ETX>>

  • Electronics consortia to impact products for generations

    A growing web of collaborative ventures that has spread throughout electronics R&D establishments in recent years is discussed. The ventures cut across corporate and national boundaries, linking military and civilian organisations, private and public sector concerns, and even corporate rivals that are ordinarily fiercely competitive. The primary reason for the increasing emphasis on collaboration is economics; R&D in the semiconductor industry has always been expensive, and technological progress has apparently made it even costlier. A second reason for the trend is that patent enforcement has improved, making more companies willing to share ideas. Collaborative efforts in the US, Europe, and Japan are compared.<<ETX>>

  • VLSI industry-university interaction

    The major issues coupling industrial manpower/technical requirements to university teaching/research programs will be discussed, including such vital areas as: the facets of VLSI constrained by personnel shortages; technical contributions universities can make in VLSI, outlining specialities versus generalist activities at boundaries between traditional disciplines . . . Also to be addressed are such key factors as unrestricted versus contract forms for industrial funding of university research and proprietary information rights, idea ownership and publishability . . . Additionally, panelists will debate the degree of priority universities should give to industrial personnel retraining.

  • Education: trouble waiting in the wings

    The educational problems that underlie the decline in the US engineering labor force are addressed. The influence of the US Department of Defense (DoD), which is mostly felt indirectly through the research it sponsors at universities, is examined. Funding of university research by industry and the Federal Government (other than DoD) is discussed. A critical shortage of faculty, which is only a decade away, is also discussed.<<ETX>>

  • Defense: toward smaller, more deployable forces, as lethal as can be

    An examination is made of changes in the US defense establishment motivated by the Cold War's demise and the decline in military budgets, coupled with the danger of Third World conflict. Strategic revisions are discussed, and the goals that will direct future R&D are outlined. How to achieve long-term military stability in the changing environment is addressed.<<ETX>>

  • Back to the future: a perspective (defense spending)

    The impact of declines in defense spending on industry is considered. Cutbacks following World War II and the Korean and Vietnam Wars are examined in an attempt to assess what the effect would be if the current reduction in defense budget growth proves to be another decline rather than a plateau.<<ETX>>

  • In search of peaceful pastures (defense electrical engineers)

    Profiles are presented of six EEs who set their sights on new niches in the wake of cutbacks in defense spending. These engineers had varying experiences and lessons are drawn from these experiences. They suggest trying to make the transition before it is an emergency, not getting too specialized, and continuing to develop one's skills.<<ETX>>



Standards related to Defense industry

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Defense industry"


Jobs related to Defense industry

Back to Top