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2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


2020 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and North American Radio Science Meeting

The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of the art research in the area of antennas and propagation, electromagnetic engineering and radio science


2020 59th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)

The CDC is the premier conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of systems and control. The CDC annually brings together an international community of researchers and practitioners in the field of automatic control to discuss new research results, perspectives on future developments, and innovative applications relevant to decision making, automatic control, and related areas.


2020 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting (PESGM)

The Annual IEEE PES General Meeting will bring together over 2900 attendees for technical sessions, administrative sessions, super sessions, poster sessions, student programs, awards ceremonies, committee meetings, tutorials and more


2020 IEEE/PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition (T&D)

Bi-Annual IEEE PES T&D conference. Largest T&D conference in North America.


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Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE

Each tutorial reviews currents communications topics in network management and computer and wireless communications. Available tutorials, which are 2.5 to 5 hours in length contains the original visuals and voice-over by the presenter. IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials features two distinct types of articles: original articles and reprints. The original articles are exclusively written for IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials ...


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


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Discussion on “the engineer's activity in public affairs — Public utility commissions and franchise valuations”, at New York, April 10, 1908

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1908

George S. Coleman: In one respect I agree with Mr. Floy, engineers as a class are, perhaps, a little too modest; but I do not quite agree that engineers ought to be considered in any wise responsible for matters which are hard enough for other men to handle, men who are devoting all their time to it. I do think, ...


Induction motor load losses

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1913

On account of uncertainties and irregularities, methods of measuring losses are more desirable than those involving the entire energy. The usual losses, viz. core, loss, friction, and I2r are mentioned and conditions shown under which so-called load losses appear; these are largely in the form of excess core loss, due to saturation of the teeth. Excess copper loss may also ...


Potential waves of alternating-current generators

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1913

The author states his purpose to be three-fold: 1. To discuss briefly certain elements in design that affect the character of the potential wave; 2. To show the effect of load and operating conditions on the no-load wave; 3. To give illustrations of the potential waves, — good, bad and indifferent, of generators, that actually supply the a-c. systems throughout ...


Discussion on “a new method of training engineers,” and “the relation of the manufacturing company to the technical graduate.” Atlantic City, N. J., July 2, 1908

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1909

B. A. Behrend: Permit me to discuss the paper by Mr. Alexander, suggesting a new method for training engineers by alternating shop work with college work. Let us see how difficult it would be to have such courses at institutions situated far away from manufacturing centers like Cornell, Leland Stanford, University of Wisconsin, or Pennsylvania State College. How could the ...


Discussion on “permeability measurements with alternating current” (Robinson and Ball), and “measurements of maximum values in high-voltage testing” (Sharp and Farmer), Boston, Mass., June 28, 1912. (see proceedings for July and June, 1912)

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1913

E. D. Doyle: As has been suggested in the paper by Messrs. Sharp and Farmer, the electrostatic voltmeter should have small leakage losses. If the voltmeter has low insulation resistance, it will not hold its charge but will discharge according to the exponential law


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  • Discussion on “the engineer's activity in public affairs — Public utility commissions and franchise valuations”, at New York, April 10, 1908

    George S. Coleman: In one respect I agree with Mr. Floy, engineers as a class are, perhaps, a little too modest; but I do not quite agree that engineers ought to be considered in any wise responsible for matters which are hard enough for other men to handle, men who are devoting all their time to it. I do think, however, that the time has come when groups of engineers, different kinds of engineers, should give the benefit of their concerted thought and action to any public question on which they are supposed to be especially well informed. In the case of a new bridge across any of our rivers, or a new subway, or a new elevated railroad, in fact any kind of engineering work likely to affect the public, this Institute, and every body of engineers who in any way might be related to that enterprise, should be heard officially. If Mr. Floy's suggestion this evening shall encourage among engineers the habit of not merely quiet, independent thought in their work, but concerted action after discussion, he will have accomplished a notable result.

  • Induction motor load losses

    On account of uncertainties and irregularities, methods of measuring losses are more desirable than those involving the entire energy. The usual losses, viz. core, loss, friction, and I2r are mentioned and conditions shown under which so-called load losses appear; these are largely in the form of excess core loss, due to saturation of the teeth. Excess copper loss may also appear and be corrected for, both in primary and secondary. Test results are given showing the effect of saturation in the teeth, and excess copper losses; also from 29 input output tests, showing the efficiency by direct measurements in comparison with the method of losses, showing an average of about ¾ of 1 per cent lower by direct measurement. Results of two tests are shown where load losses were excessive, due to peculiar construction. The conclusion is that where no saturation exists there will be no load losses, and no excess copper losses in wire wound stators.

  • Potential waves of alternating-current generators

    The author states his purpose to be three-fold: 1. To discuss briefly certain elements in design that affect the character of the potential wave; 2. To show the effect of load and operating conditions on the no-load wave; 3. To give illustrations of the potential waves, — good, bad and indifferent, of generators, that actually supply the a-c. systems throughout the country. There are ninety illustrations in all; a study of these shows, in connection with the descriptions given, that the most perfect wave is obtained where the proper shading of the magnetic flux is obtained either by shaping the poles, in the case of definite pole machines, or the proper distribution of field winding, in the case of cylindrical rotor machines, together with an irregular, or more or less prime relation between the number of slots in the armature and number of poles.

  • Discussion on “a new method of training engineers,” and “the relation of the manufacturing company to the technical graduate.” Atlantic City, N. J., July 2, 1908

    B. A. Behrend: Permit me to discuss the paper by Mr. Alexander, suggesting a new method for training engineers by alternating shop work with college work. Let us see how difficult it would be to have such courses at institutions situated far away from manufacturing centers like Cornell, Leland Stanford, University of Wisconsin, or Pennsylvania State College. How could the students in these universities attend the lectures for one week and go into the shops for the next week, or for one month and go into the shop for the next month? There are no shops or manufacturing plants near enough in which the students could pursue practical work, and thus the proposed “Coöperative System” is altogether impossible in a large number of our universities.

  • Discussion on “permeability measurements with alternating current” (Robinson and Ball), and “measurements of maximum values in high-voltage testing” (Sharp and Farmer), Boston, Mass., June 28, 1912. (see proceedings for July and June, 1912)

    E. D. Doyle: As has been suggested in the paper by Messrs. Sharp and Farmer, the electrostatic voltmeter should have small leakage losses. If the voltmeter has low insulation resistance, it will not hold its charge but will discharge according to the exponential law

  • Discussion on “three-phase power-factor.” Atlantic city, N. J., June 30, 1908

    Comfort A. Adams: I think that at least a part of Mr. Burt's demonstration may be rendered less mathematical to the advantage of one's physical conception of the problem. I refer to that part leading up to equation (34) which is the algebraic statement of the validity of the ordinary method of measuring three- phase power by means of two wattmeters.

  • Discussion on “the wiring of large buildings for telephone service.” (Rhodes) Boston, Mass., June 27, 1912. (see proceedings for July 1912)

    Edwin M. Surprise I noted in reading Mr. Rhodes' paper, that in New York City, at least, and probably in other places where very large and tall office buildings are under consideration, the scheme of attenuation is employed; that is, a large cable is brought in at the basement and branches taken off from that cable at necessary intervals. In our New England territory we have leaned a good deal toward the extension of small risers, one, two, or more, as may be required, to each floor, with the idea that it would result in economy, not only on account of the first cost of extending the cables, but also by reason of flexibility.

  • Discussion on “high-potential underground transmission.” New York October 9, 1908

    President Ferguson: The subject for discussion this evening, gentlemen, is not only interesting from a scientific standpoint, but is of great importance commercially, because of its possible influence upon the investment and methods of operation of our large lighting and power systems.

  • Discussion on “induction machines for heavy single-phase motor service,” “electrical operation of the West Jersey Seashore railroad,” “analysis of electrification.” Chicago, Ill., June 28, 1911. (see proceedings for April, 1911, June, 1911, August, 1911)

    Frank J. Sprague: I have a somewhat proprietary and professional interest in Chicago. It is true, as the President has said, that my inaugural address in 1892 was on the coming developments in electric railways. That was some nineteen years ago. It was the same year when Charles J. Van Depoele, that ingenious, persistent and hard working pioneer in the electric railway field, gave up his earthly activities, and left his name, his influence and the record of his early work, but also a continuing loss to a new development and to a great industry.

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