Conferences related to Cellular biophysics

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2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2020 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

All areas of ionizing radiation detection - detectors, signal processing, analysis of results, PET development, PET results, medical imaging using ionizing radiation


2020 IEEE 17th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2020)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2020 will be the 17th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2020 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross-fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2002 1st IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2002)

  • 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2004)

  • 2006 IEEE 3rd International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2006)

  • 2007 IEEE 4th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2007)

  • 2008 IEEE 5th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2008)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2009 IEEE 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2009)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2010 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2010)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2011 IEEE 8th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2011)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2012 IEEE 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2012)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2013 IEEE 10th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2013)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2014)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2014 will be the eleventh meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2015)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2015 will be the 12th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2016)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forumfor the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2016 willbe the thirteenth meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitatinginteraction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2016 meeting will continue thistradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrativeapproach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2017)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2017 will be the 14th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2017 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2018 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2018)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2018 will be the 15th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2018 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.



Periodicals related to Cellular biophysics

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Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation, IEEE Transactions on

Electrical insulation common to the design and construction of components and equipment for use in electric and electronic circuits and distribution systems at all frequencies.



Most published Xplore authors for Cellular biophysics

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Xplore Articles related to Cellular biophysics

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Cell Segmentation: 50 Years Down the Road [Life Sciences]

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, 2012

Ever since the establishment of cell theory in the early 19th century, which recognized the cell as the fundamental building unit of life, biologists have sought to explain the underlying principles. Momentous discoveries were made over the course of many decades of research [1], but the quest to attain full understanding of cellular mechanisms and how to manipulate them to ...


Three-dimensional model of cardiac electromechanics: cell to organ

Proceedings of the Second Joint 24th Annual Conference and the Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society] [Engineering in Medicine and Biology, 2002

We describe a new computational model that integrates the cellular biophysics of ventricular myocytes into structurally detailed three-dimensional models of the ventricular walls during the whole cardiac cycle. The new model is suitable for investigating hypotheses regarding excitation-contraction coupling in the intact heart.


From Cellular Cultures to Cellular Spheroids: Is Impedance Spectroscopy a Viable Tool for Monitoring Multicellular Spheroid (MCS) Drug Models?

IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, 2013

The use of 3-D multicellular spheroid (MCS) models is increasingly being accepted as a viable means to study cell-cell, cell-matrix and cell-drug interactions. Behavioral differences between traditional monolayer (2-D) cell cultures and more recent 3-D MCS confirm that 3-D MCS more closely model the in vivo environment. However, analyzing the effect of pharmaceutical agents on both monolayer cultures and MCS ...


Biological Applications of a Nanomanipulator Based on AFM: In situ visualization and quantification of cellular behaviors at the single-molecule level.

IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, 2015

Cells are the structural and functional unit of living organisms. Knowledge of cellular behaviors is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanisms that guide the physiological and pathological changes in living organisms. So far, virtually all knowledge of the molecular reactions in cells has come from the ensemble measurements done in test tubes with purified molecules [1], [2]. The ...


Isotropically Etched Silicon Microarrays for Rapid Breast Cancer Cell Capture

IEEE Sensors Journal, 2013

In this paper, we describe design and fabrication of 3-D silicon microarrays consisting of a wide range of isotropically-etched concave cavities for cell- capturing applications. The microarrays supported rapid and efficient capture of metastatic human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) from single-cell suspensions. Furthermore, the captured cells adhered and were retained within the etched cavities for at least 72 h. Cavity ...



Educational Resources on Cellular biophysics

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IEEE.tv Videos

IMS 2012 Microapps - Use of FPGAs for Faster Test Times and Repeatability on Cellular Measurements
IEEE Brain: Regulatory Considerations
Millimeter Wave Mobile Communications for 5G Cellular: It Will Work!
Brooklyn 5G Summit 2014: Dr. Robert Heath on Coverage and Capacity Analysis of Dense Millimeter Wave Cellular System
IMS 2014: Design and Analysis of a Low-Profile 28 GHz Beam Steering Antenna Solution for Future 5G Cellular Applications
Microfluidic devices for precision biological measurement: Stephen Quake
Electric-field Bit Write-in for Molecular Quantum-dot Cellular Automata - Enrique Blair - ICRC 2018
Beyond the Cellular Paradigm: Cell-Free Architectures with Radio Stripes - IEEE Future Networks Webinar
RFIC - The Growth of Cellular Communications
What's Beyond 5G - Andrea Goldsmith - 5G World Forum Santa Clara 2018
IMS 2011 Plenary: J. David Rhodes on WCDMA and 4G LTE
A 12-b, 1-GS/s 6.1mW Current-Steering DAC in 14nm FinFET with 80dB SFDR for 2G/3G/4G Cellular Application: RFIC Industry Showcase 2017
Molecular Cellular Networks: A Non von Neumann Architecture for Molecular Electronics - Craig Lent: 2016 International Conference on Rebooting Computing
A Direct-Conversion Transmitter for Small-Cell Cellular Base Stations with Integrated Digital Predistortion in 65nm CMOS: RFIC Industry Showcase
IEEE DAY Industry Webinar
Honors 2020: Rajiv Laroia Wins the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal
Brooklyn 5G Summit 2014: How mmWave Technology can Complement the Cellular Radio World by Dr. Thomas Haustein
5g Cellular: It Will Work!
Part Two: Interview with John Tisdale—IEEE VIC Summit 2018
mmWave for Future Public Safety Communications - Michele Zorzi - 5G Technologies for Tactical and First Responder Networks 2018

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Cell Segmentation: 50 Years Down the Road [Life Sciences]

    Ever since the establishment of cell theory in the early 19th century, which recognized the cell as the fundamental building unit of life, biologists have sought to explain the underlying principles. Momentous discoveries were made over the course of many decades of research [1], but the quest to attain full understanding of cellular mechanisms and how to manipulate them to improve health continues to the present day, with bigger budgets, more minds, and more sophisticated tools than ever before. One of the tools to which a great deal of the progress in cell biology can be attributed is light microscopy [2]. The field has come a long way since Antoni van Leeuwenhoeks first steps in the 1670s toward improving and exploiting microscopic imaging for studying life at the cellular level. Not only do biologists today have a plethora of different, complementary microscopic imaging techniques at their disposal that enable them to visualize phenomena even way below the classical diffraction limit of light, advanced microscope systems also allow them to easily acquire very large numbers of images within just a matter of hours. The abundance, heterogeneity, dimensionality, and complexity of the data generated in modern imaging experiments rule out manual image management, processing, and analysis. Consequently, computerized techniques for performing these tasks have become of key importance for further progress in cell biology [3][6]. A central problem in many studies, and often regarded as the cornerstone of image analysis, is image segmentation. Specifically, since cellular morphology is an important phenotypic feature that is indicative of the physiological state of a cell, and since the cell contour is often required for subsequent analysis of intracellular processes (zooming in to nanoscale), or of cell sociology (zooming out to millimeter scale), the problem of cell segmentation has received increasing attention in past years [7]. Here we reflect on how the field has evolved over the years and how past developments can be expected to extrapolate into the future.

  • Three-dimensional model of cardiac electromechanics: cell to organ

    We describe a new computational model that integrates the cellular biophysics of ventricular myocytes into structurally detailed three-dimensional models of the ventricular walls during the whole cardiac cycle. The new model is suitable for investigating hypotheses regarding excitation-contraction coupling in the intact heart.

  • From Cellular Cultures to Cellular Spheroids: Is Impedance Spectroscopy a Viable Tool for Monitoring Multicellular Spheroid (MCS) Drug Models?

    The use of 3-D multicellular spheroid (MCS) models is increasingly being accepted as a viable means to study cell-cell, cell-matrix and cell-drug interactions. Behavioral differences between traditional monolayer (2-D) cell cultures and more recent 3-D MCS confirm that 3-D MCS more closely model the in vivo environment. However, analyzing the effect of pharmaceutical agents on both monolayer cultures and MCS is very time intensive. This paper reviews the use of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), a label-free whole cell assay technique, as a tool for automated screening of cell drug interactions in MCS models for biologically/physiologically relevant events over long periods of time. EIS calculates the impedance of a sample by applying an AC current through a range of frequencies and measuring the resulting voltage. This review will introduce techniques used in impedance-based analysis of 2-D systems; highlight recently developed impedance-based techniques for analyzing 3-D cell cultures; and discuss applications of 3-D culture impedance monitoring systems.

  • Biological Applications of a Nanomanipulator Based on AFM: In situ visualization and quantification of cellular behaviors at the single-molecule level.

    Cells are the structural and functional unit of living organisms. Knowledge of cellular behaviors is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanisms that guide the physiological and pathological changes in living organisms. So far, virtually all knowledge of the molecular reactions in cells has come from the ensemble measurements done in test tubes with purified molecules [1], [2]. The disadvantage of this approach is that experiments with purified molecules require the lysis of cells, meaning that the obtained results may not reflect the real situations of living cells.

  • Isotropically Etched Silicon Microarrays for Rapid Breast Cancer Cell Capture

    In this paper, we describe design and fabrication of 3-D silicon microarrays consisting of a wide range of isotropically-etched concave cavities for cell- capturing applications. The microarrays supported rapid and efficient capture of metastatic human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) from single-cell suspensions. Furthermore, the captured cells adhered and were retained within the etched cavities for at least 72 h. Cavity spacing of 30-50 μm was most suitable for capture of the cells within microwells. Cell capture was evident within 1 min and was essentially complete by 20-30 min. Capture of 10 μm beads proceeded with a similar time frame and efficiency. Cell capture was 80%-90% efficient and was independent of cavity diameters tested: 35, 60, 70, and 100 μm. The depth of the microwells ranged from 28 to 54 μm. For single-cell capture, the 35 μm diameter cavity was optimal. The larger cavities contained 3-10 cells and were better suited for applications sensing cell proliferation, cell-cell interactions, stem cell differentiation, and drug responsiveness. The proposed silicon microarrays did not require any chemical coating or surface modification to support micro co-cultures of normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A) and MDA-MB-231 after cell trapping. This paper demonstrates that the silicon microarrays efficiently capture individual human breast cancer cells from a mono-culture suspension and in a mixture of excess MCF10A. Therefore the developed silicon platform is suitable for efficient detection and sensing of individual human breast cancer cells.

  • Automated Disease Identification With 3-D Optical Imaging: A Medical Diagnostic Tool

    Digital holographic microscopy is an ideal tool for 3-D cell imaging and characterization. It provides a host of cell parameters based on cell morphology and its temporal dynamics or time variation. These parameters can be used to study and quantify cell growth and cell physiology. When coupled with classification algorithms, this technique can also be used to identify and classify cells such as blood cells for automated disease identification. A compact, portable version of this 3-D optical imaging system has the potential to become a device for compact field portable biological data collection, analysis, and cell identification leading to disease diagnosis with mobile devices, low cost instruments for deployment in remote areas with limited access to healthcare to combat disease. In this paper, we present an overview of our reported work on the development of digital holographic microscopes and their applications in 3-D cell imaging, cell parameter extraction and cell classification for potential automated disease identification.

  • High-Throughput Image Reconstruction and Analysis (Rao, A.R. and Cecchi, G.A.; 2009) [Book Reviews]

    This book explores how the coupling of high-performance computing (HPC) with automated imaging techniques can impact and further our understanding of complex biological systems and provides an integrated view of technology- driven capability in science, where HPC is used beneficially to create and analyze complex models gathered from large biological data sets. The book consists of four sections and 14 chapters. Each chapter was prepared by selected subject expert teams active in the research of respective topics with varying degree of balance between theoretic presentation and real-world case summation and overview. Overall, the book is quite extensive. It would make an excellent reference for bioinformatics or biomedical engineering graduate students, cell biologists, microscope manufacturers, HPC developers, and drug discovery professionals interested in learning about new perspectives in technology-driven clinical product development approach.

  • Biosensors, Medical Imaging, and Biology for Engineers [review of "3-D Cell-Based Biosensors in Drug Discovery Programs: Microtissue Engineering for High Throughput Screening (Kisaalita, W. S.; 2010)] [Book Reviews]

    This book is written to help bioengineers and bioscientists understand cell- based biosensor systems and apply them for their research in the areas of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industries. It provides a very comprehensive overview of the issues that bioengineers and scientists deal with, such as biosensors, drug discovery, and nanotechnology.



Standards related to Cellular biophysics

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No standards are currently tagged "Cellular biophysics"