Conferences related to Biological effects of radiation

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Magnetic Conference (INTERMAG)

INTERMAG is the premier conference on all aspects of applied magnetism and provides a range of oral and poster presentations, invited talks and symposia, a tutorial session, and exhibits reviewing the latest developments in magnetism.


2020 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference (IPMHVC)

This conference provides an exchange of technical topics in the fields of Solid State Modulators and Switches, Breakdown and Insulation, Compact Pulsed Power Systems, High Voltage Design, High Power Microwaves, Biological Applications, Analytical Methods and Modeling, and Accelerators.


2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 44th International Conference on Infrared, Millimeter, and Terahertz Waves (IRMMW-THz)

Science, technology and applications spanning the millimeter-waves, terahertz and infrared spectral regions


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Periodicals related to Biological effects of radiation

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Education, IEEE Transactions on

Educational methods, technology, and programs; history of technology; impact of evolving research on education.


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Most published Xplore authors for Biological effects of radiation

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Xplore Articles related to Biological effects of radiation

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IEE Colloquium on 'EMC and Medicine' (Digest No.098)

IEE Colloquium on EMC and Medicine, 1993

None


The new IEEE standard for exposures to RF/microwave energy and the instrumentation available to perform compliance measurements

IEE Colloquium on EMC and Medicine, 1993

None


EMC and electrical hypersensitivity

IEE Colloquium on EMC and Medicine, 1993

Electromagnetic compatibility in medicine involves ensuring that any possible interactions of electronic and electrical apparatus with people, and of people with electronic and electrical apparatus, shall not give rise to any malfunction, human or technical. Particularly as this might lead to a hazardous situation either through false bio-information in diagnosis and therapy, or through electric, magnetic or radiation interactions between ...


IEEE Draft Recommended Practices of Modulating Current in High Brightness LEDs for Mitigating Health Risks to Viewers

IEEE P1789/D2, September 2014, 2014

Definition of the concept of modulation frequencies for LEDs; a discussion on their applications to LED lighting; a describe LED lighting applications in which modulation frequencies pose possible health risks to users are addressed in this recommended practice. A discussion on the concept of dimming of LEDs by modulating the frequency of driving currents/voltage and present recommendations for modulation frequencies ...


Comments on "Results of a Long-Term Low-Level Microwave Exposure of Rats

IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, 2011

In a recent publication in this Transactions, Adang et al. concluded that long-term exposure to RF electromagnetic fields may have effects on survival and on blood parameters in rats. The Electromagnetic Fields Committee of the Health Council of The Netherlands disputes this conclusion.


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Biological effects of radiation

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IEEE.tv Videos

Larson Collection interview with Rudolph Peierls
Brooklyn 5G Summit 2014: Channel Measurements Summary by Ted Rappaport
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Mehmet R. Dokmeci
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Ali Khademhosseini
EMBC 2011-Workshop-Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Michelle Khine
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Utkan Demirci
IMS 2012 Microapps - Reducing Active Device Temperature Rise and RF Heating Effects with High Thermal Conductivity Low Loss Circuit Laminates
IMS MicroApp: Unexpected effects of conductor profile on the propagation constant
Larson Collection interview with Linus Pauling, part 2
Engineering the Future - Frances Arnold, Ph.D.
Life Sciences Grand Challenge Conference - Roger Kamm
Introducing DAGSI Whegs
Micro-Apps 2013: Rapid Simulation of Large Phased Array T/R Module Networks
Larson Collection interview with Linus Pauling, part 1
Panel 1: Critical Modeling Aspects & Effects on System Design & Performance - Brooklyn 5G 2015
The Josephson Effect: The Observations of Josephson's Effects
Q&A with Dr. Al Emondi: IEEE Brain Podcast, Episode 13
Feeding the Machine: The World's Most Sophisticated Artificial Stomach
EMBC 2012 Theme Speaker: Dr. James Bassingthwaighte
Tapping the Computing Power of the Unconscious Brain

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • IEE Colloquium on 'EMC and Medicine' (Digest No.098)

    None

  • The new IEEE standard for exposures to RF/microwave energy and the instrumentation available to perform compliance measurements

    None

  • EMC and electrical hypersensitivity

    Electromagnetic compatibility in medicine involves ensuring that any possible interactions of electronic and electrical apparatus with people, and of people with electronic and electrical apparatus, shall not give rise to any malfunction, human or technical. Particularly as this might lead to a hazardous situation either through false bio-information in diagnosis and therapy, or through electric, magnetic or radiation interactions between the patient, operator or apparatus. The implications of such research over the past decade are that levels of EMR which are present in the environment, whether natural or man-made, can cause stress and contribute to illness in certain hypersensitive persons. By the time that such environmental illness has progressed to the stage of meriting a formal medical diagnosis, it may also have progressed to the stage of irreversibility; early diagnosis is essential. Not only can such persons be said to be incompatible with life in an electronic and electrical society, but they may emit levels of EMR which make them incompatible with certain electronics devices as presently designed.<<ETX>>

  • IEEE Draft Recommended Practices of Modulating Current in High Brightness LEDs for Mitigating Health Risks to Viewers

    Definition of the concept of modulation frequencies for LEDs; a discussion on their applications to LED lighting; a describe LED lighting applications in which modulation frequencies pose possible health risks to users are addressed in this recommended practice. A discussion on the concept of dimming of LEDs by modulating the frequency of driving currents/voltage and present recommendations for modulation frequencies (flicker) for LED lighting and dimming applications to help protect against known potential adverse health effects is also addressed.

  • Comments on "Results of a Long-Term Low-Level Microwave Exposure of Rats

    In a recent publication in this Transactions, Adang et al. concluded that long-term exposure to RF electromagnetic fields may have effects on survival and on blood parameters in rats. The Electromagnetic Fields Committee of the Health Council of The Netherlands disputes this conclusion.

  • American National Standard Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Radiated Radio-Frequency (RF) Emissions from RF Transmitters

    The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide an ad hoc test method to estimate the electromagnetic immunity of medical devices and help identify interference issues that might exist with critical medical devices as a result of emissions from RF transmitters increasingly used in health-care facilities, particularly by doctors, staff, patients, and visitors. RF transmitters include two-way radios, walkie-talkies, mobile phones, wireless-enabled laptop computers and similar devices, RFID readers, networked mp3 players, two-way pagers, wireless PDAs, and wireless medical devices. The test protocol is designed to be performed as follows: a) By clinical engineers, biomedical engineers, and other technical personnel b) In a way that is relatively rapid and practical c) In an area and with equipment that are commonly available d) To identify specific effects and thresholds (i.e., transmit power and distance) to provide the basic information needed to develop a mitigation action plan e) To generate test results that can be used in the formulation of policies and procedures for managing the use of RF transmitters within a health-care facility. A preferred method (5.6.2) and several alternative RF sources and methods (Annex C) for ad hoc testing are outlined in this recommended practice to allow flexibility with regard to the time, personnel, and resources available to perform the testing. As a result, these different options provide different levels of accuracy and comprehensiveness. The most appropriate ad hoc test strategy will depend on the needs and resources of the user of this recommended practice. This recommended practice also provides guidance for selection of the medical devices to be tested, operation of RF transmitters used as RF test sources, and assessment of test results. The preferred method for evaluation in most circumstances involves the use of the actual RF transmitter(s) (e.g., mobile phones and portable and mobile radios) as test sources to generate the same RF signals that would be encountered in the health-care facility. This approach also assumes that the end user has limited time and resources, a small number of critical medical devices to test, a limited space in which to perform the testing, and a single or a small number of specific RF transmitter signals to examine. In this preferred method, the RF transmitter is placed in a constantly transmitting state (i.e., test mode). The tests can be performed with or without an electric-field- strength (E-field) meter, although the use of an E-field meter is recommended. Another important function of this recommended practice is to define a consistent test protocol to allow results to be obtained and compared within and across institutions. Clinical and biomedical engineers have performed their own rudimentary (ad hoc) electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) testing using in-house methodology, RF transmitter sources, and medical devices. As a result, a comparison of the findings between health-care organizations might not be appropriate. To facilitate a comparison between health-care organizations, it is important that the recommendations herein are followed, deviations are kept to a minimum, and the testing is performed as consistently as possible. Policies and procedures for mitigation of electromagnetic interference (EMI)^2 in health-care facilities, including the use or restriction of specific RF transmitters within specific areas, often called an exclusion zone, should be based on objective information, including that obtained by the use of this test method. A common problem with exclusion zones is that they are difficult to enforce. With regard to purchase evaluation, confirming that medical devices conform to voluntary EMC immunity standards can provide some information, although many RF transmitters are able to exceed these immunity levels greatly when held close to a medical device.

  • Effects of microwave and mobile-telephone exposure on memory processes

    Three behavioral tests are described using rats to examine changes associated with learning and memory tasks, following microwave exposure. Working or short-term memory was measured via object discrimination, spatial memory was assessed using a radial-arm maze with food rewards, and spatial-reference learning and memory were measured using a circular water maze. The results indicate significant SAR-dependent decreases in object discrimination, significant variation with a spatial-learning and working-memory task in the radial-arm maze for two species of animals, and significant microwave-related impairments in spatial reference memory in a circular water maze at 1.2 W/kg. Deficits in the object-discrimination task were seen at 1 W/kg but not at 0.1 W/kg, both with no measurable microwave hyperthermia. Likewise, the behavioral measures of spatial memory also indicate a SAR-related response: no impairment at 0.05 W/kg but impairment at 0.6 W/kg.

  • The Curious Case of the IARC Working Group on Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Cell Phones [Health Effects]

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) announced on 31 May 2011 that it has classified radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs), including those employed by cellular mobile telephones, as possibly carcinogenic to humans [1]. This implies that there could be some cancer risk associated with the use of cell phones.

  • Wireless Power Transfer for Mobile Applications, and Health Effects [Telecommunications Health and Safety]

    Recent interest and current optimism regarding battery-charging wireless power-transfer technology are driven by the ubiquity of cell phones and other mobile communication devices. In some ways, this is to make a dream come true: a truly wireless mobile or portable communication device, completely free from being tethered in any way. The concept of wireless power transfer is not new, even for charging batteries. Cellular service users and customers may be annoyed by or do not want to be bothered with having to plug the mobile device into an electrical outlet. If this is true - as appears to be the case - then time may well provide a fix to the grief. Aside from not having to plug in the mobile phone or laptop, a more probable cause for the sudden interest in battery charging through wireless power transfer may come from the potential for mobile communication devices to get their electrical power the same way they get their data. Unlike wireless communication uses, the level of transmitted electromagnetic power required for large-scale or commercial implementation of wireless power transfer could be substantial. A key feature of the system design and research effort should be consideration of biological effects and human safety.

  • Study of the tissue volume for spatial-peak mass-averaged SAR evaluation

    For being adaptable to the irregular shape of a biological model and for not underestimating the spatial-peak mass-averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) of hand-held wireless telephones, a method of taking a contiguous tissue volume for the SAR-averaging-mass is proposed. The proposed method is to obtain a tissue volume for SAR averaging by summing node massed of the layers enclosing the point in which the averaged SAR is wanted in a body model until the summed mass is closest to the required mass. Therefore, at the skin layer and in the tissue region around the sinuses such as nasal cavities, the averaging volume can follow closely the shape of the region. To investigate the effect of this algorithm on SAR evaluation, SARs have been evaluated numerically for an anatomical head with a simple hand models exposed to a mobile phone, using the proposed method and the previous method of averaging over a cubic tissue volume and the results are compared. The results show that the proposed algorithm is very reasonable and leads to more stable values for spatial-peak mass-averaged SAR evaluation in an irregularly shaped model such as a realistic human model.



Standards related to Biological effects of radiation

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IEEE Standard for Safety Levels With Respect to Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields, 0-3 kHz

Develop safety levels for human exposure to electromagnetic fields from 0 to 3kHz. This standard will be based on the results of an evaluation of the relevant scientific literature and proven effects which are well established and for which thresholds of reaction are understood. Field limits will be derived from threshold current densities or internal electric fields.


IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz

Recommendations are made to protect against established adverse health effects in human beings associated with exposure to electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in the frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz. The recommendations are expressed in terms of basic restrictions (BRs) and maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values. The BRs are limits on internal fields, specific absorption rate (SAR), and ...


Recommended Practice for Measurements and Computation of Electric, Magnetic and Electromagnetic Fields With Respect to Human Exposure to Such Fields, 0 - 100 kHz

This recommended practice describes 1) methods for measuring external electric and magnetic fields and contact currents to which persons may be exposed, 2) instrument characteristics and the methods for calibrating such instruments, and 3) methods for computation and the measurement of the resulting fields and currents that are induced in bodies of humans exposed to these fields. This recommended practice ...



Jobs related to Biological effects of radiation

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