Conferences related to Biological tissues

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2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE 17th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2020)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2020 will be the 17th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2020 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross-fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2018 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2018)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2018 will be the 15th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2018 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2017)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2017 will be the 14th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2017 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2016)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forumfor the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2016 willbe the thirteenth meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitatinginteraction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2016 meeting will continue thistradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrativeapproach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2015)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2015 will be the 12th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2014)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2014 will be the eleventh meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2013 IEEE 10th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2013)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2012 IEEE 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2012)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2011 IEEE 8th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2011)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2010 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2010)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2009 IEEE 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2009)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2008 IEEE 5th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2008)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2007 IEEE 4th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2007)

  • 2006 IEEE 3rd International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2006)

  • 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2004)

  • 2002 1st IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2002)


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

All areas of ionizing radiation detection - detectors, signal processing, analysis of results, PET development, PET results, medical imaging using ionizing radiation


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Periodicals related to Biological tissues

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


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Most published Xplore authors for Biological tissues

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Xplore Articles related to Biological tissues

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Advances In Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Electro International, 1991, 1991

None


Design and Construction a measurer of total body water, fat mass and fat free mass using LabVIEW

2014 III International Congress of Engineering Mechatronics and Automation (CIIMA), 2014

Bioimpedance analysis or bioelectrical impedance provides information related to the degree of hydration and nutrition, which exists in the human body. In recent years it has boomed creating many monitors that provide us with different items, such as, fat mass, fat-free mass, total body water, among others. This article aims to inform the principles of electricity needed to comprise a ...


Towards automated bioimage analysis: from features to semantics

3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Nano to Macro, 2006., 2006

Recent advances in bio-molecular imaging have afforded biologists a more thorough understanding of cellular functions in complex tissue structures. For example, high resolution fluorescence images of the retina reveal details about tissue restructuring during detachment experiments. Time sequence imagery of microtubules provides insight into subcellular dynamics in response to cancer treatment drugs. However, technological progress is accompanied by a rapid ...


1D-4 High Speed Imaging of Bubble Clouds in Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy - Histotripsy

2006 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 2006

Our investigations have shown that short (les50 musec) high intensity, low duty cycle ultrasound pulses can achieve significant breakdown of tissue structure at a tissue-fluid interface and in bulk soft tissue. We call this technique "histotripsy", and inertial cavitation is its hypothesized mechanism. To understand the physical basis of histotripsy, a high speed camera was used to image hypothesized bubble ...


An Improved Articulated Registration Method For Neck Images

2005 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 27th Annual Conference, 2006

This paper presents a complete method estimating the displacement field of bodies constrained by an articulated model such as the neck area. Indeed bony structures between different patient images, such as vertebras, may rigidly move while other tissues may deform. The method is divided into 3 steps. The method first registers the articulated rigid bodies together. Then it propagates the ...


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Educational Resources on Biological tissues

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IEEE.tv Videos

Implantable Wireless Medical Devices and Systems
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Mehmet R. Dokmeci
Life Sciences Grand Challenge Conference - Laura Niklason
EMBC 2011-Workshop-Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Michelle Khine
Continuously Learning Neuromorphic Systems with High Biological Realism: IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Ali Khademhosseini
EMBC 2011-Keynote Lecture-Engineering Drug Dosing in Dynamic Biological Systems - David J. Balaban
EMBC 2011-Workshop- Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (BioMEMS): Fundamentals and Applications-Utkan Demirci
EMBC 2011-Program-Systems in Synthetic Biology (Part I)-Pamela A. Silver
Engineering the Future - Frances Arnold, Ph.D.
Life Sciences Grand Challenge Conference - Roger Kamm
Q&A with Dr. Al Emondi: IEEE Brain Podcast, Episode 13
Introducing DAGSI Whegs
Engineering in Medicine and Biology: Segment 3
EMBC 2012 Theme Speaker: Dr. James Bassingthwaighte
Microfluidic devices for precision biological measurement: Stephen Quake
R. Jacob Baker - SSCS Chip Chat Podcast, Episode 4
Q&A with Margaret Martonosi: IEEE Rebooting Computing Podcast, Episode 14
Smart Manufacturing: Embracing the Digital Revolution - Jane Barr at IEEE WIE Forum USA East 2017
The EU Human Brain Project - A Systematic Path from Data to Synthesis

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Advances In Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    None

  • Design and Construction a measurer of total body water, fat mass and fat free mass using LabVIEW

    Bioimpedance analysis or bioelectrical impedance provides information related to the degree of hydration and nutrition, which exists in the human body. In recent years it has boomed creating many monitors that provide us with different items, such as, fat mass, fat-free mass, total body water, among others. This article aims to inform the principles of electricity needed to comprise a related Bioimpedance as well teach what this new discipline interface.

  • Towards automated bioimage analysis: from features to semantics

    Recent advances in bio-molecular imaging have afforded biologists a more thorough understanding of cellular functions in complex tissue structures. For example, high resolution fluorescence images of the retina reveal details about tissue restructuring during detachment experiments. Time sequence imagery of microtubules provides insight into subcellular dynamics in response to cancer treatment drugs. However, technological progress is accompanied by a rapid proliferation of image data. Traditional analysis methods, namely manual measurements and qualitative assessments, become time consuming and are often nonreproducible. Computer vision tools can efficiently analyze these vast amounts of data with promising results. This paper provides an overview of several challenges faced in bioimage processing and our recent progress in addressing these issues

  • 1D-4 High Speed Imaging of Bubble Clouds in Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy - Histotripsy

    Our investigations have shown that short (les50 musec) high intensity, low duty cycle ultrasound pulses can achieve significant breakdown of tissue structure at a tissue-fluid interface and in bulk soft tissue. We call this technique "histotripsy", and inertial cavitation is its hypothesized mechanism. To understand the physical basis of histotripsy, a high speed camera was used to image hypothesized bubble clouds generated by ultrasound pulses. The results show the following: (1) Ultrasound pulses generated a bubble cloud both at a tissue-water interface and inside a gel used to mimic the bulk soft tissue. This bubble cloud plays an important role in the histotripsy process; (2) An ultrasound pulse of several musec long can generate a bubble cloud lasting for several hundreds of musec; and (3) the intensity threshold to initiate a bubble cloud is lower at a gel-water interface than inside a gel

  • An Improved Articulated Registration Method For Neck Images

    This paper presents a complete method estimating the displacement field of bodies constrained by an articulated model such as the neck area. Indeed bony structures between different patient images, such as vertebras, may rigidly move while other tissues may deform. The method is divided into 3 steps. The method first registers the articulated rigid bodies together. Then it propagates the deformation into the whole volume through the use of a tetrahedral mesh and it finishes the registration using a mutual information based optical flow. Following the ITK framework, it uses a fast stochastic gradient descent optimization strategy chosen to maximize the mutual information metric. We demonstrate this method provides accurate results on 3D CT, MR and PET images

  • Bayesian detection and estimation of regularity in soft tissue organs

    This paper deals with a method of detecting and estimating the scatterer spacing between the regularly spaced resolvable coherent scatterers in tissue. Scatterer spacing has been successfully used in classifying tissue structure, in differentiating between normal and cirrhotic liver, and in detecting diffuse liver disease. This paper presents a Wold decomposition of the radio frequency (RF) field into its diffused and coherent components from which maximum likelihood estimates (MLE) or minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimates of the scattering spacing are easily computed. The paper also presents an unbiased decision rule to detect whether or not an RF echo exhibits any specular scattering relative to the wavelength of the interrogating ultrasonic pulse. The approach has been tried on simulations as well as on in vivo scans of liver data and appears to perform well.

  • Image-based multiscale structural models of fibrous engineered tissues

    While it is firmly established that the mechanical behavior of most biological tissues, including bioengineered tissues, is governed by an underlying network of protein fibers, it is still not clear how best to obtain and utilize structural information to predict mechanical response. In this paper, methods are presented to (1) quantify the fiber arrangement in a tissue from different imaging tools, (2) incorporate that structure into a multiscale model, and (3) solve the model equations to predict both the microscopic and the macroscopic tissue response. In principle these concepts could be applied to any tissue (incorporating the specific tissue components as needed), but for demonstration purposes, the focus of the current work is on cell-compacted collagen gel, a model engineered tissue.

  • Digital Demodulation in Data Acquisition System for Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography

    In order to extract the impedance information at different frequencies in our multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system, a digital demodulation method was employed. Theoretically, this method can improve the SNR by √(N/2) times, if we sampling N point per period. Moreover, as very little system resources been needed in this method, all the calculating operations can be finished in a single Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) device instead of in a personal computer. And the final data acquisition system based on this method was established and the preliminary imaging results were obtained.

  • A Novel Finite Element Method based Biomechanical Model for HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable

  • Radiobiology of pulsed dose rates

    Any departure from CLDR will yield an increased biological effect, which is greater for tissues with smaller /spl alpha///spl beta/ ratios and shorter T/sub 1/2/ of repair. The Relative Effectiveness (RE=1+g.d/(/spl beta///spl alpha/)) for late responding tissues will increase more than the RE for early responding tissues including tumors. This could obviously lead to a reduced therapeutic ratio. Fortunately the effect is small (less than 10%) unless doses per pulse greater than 1 Gy are used. Dose-per-pulse is paramount (together with total dose) in determining the biological effect. The effect of between-pulse interval is next in importance, (longer intervals helping therapeutic ratio but not if fewer and larger pulses are used). The influence of duration of pulses and dose-rate within each pulse is less. In tissues with the shortest half-times of repair (less than 0.5 hours) the biological effect will be greater for PDR than for CLDR. The authors show here that there are no consistent differences between half-times for tumors and for normal tissues. The effect of "office-hours" PDR is very close to that of the same size and number of pulses given with standard intervals continuously, because there will be only a few overlong (overnight) intervals compared with many more standard short intervals. Late complications will be ameliorated more than tumor cell kill by increasing the intervals between pulses without increasing their size. Probably the most valuable parts of this Handout are the Tables and the References.



Standards related to Biological tissues

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IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz

Recommendations are made to protect against established adverse health effects in human beings associated with exposure to electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in the frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz. The recommendations are expressed in terms of basic restrictions (BRs) and maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values. The BRs are limits on internal fields, specific absorption rate (SAR), and ...



Jobs related to Biological tissues

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