Conferences related to Brainstem implants

Back to Top

2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2015 8th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Informatics (BMEI)

BMEI is a premier international forum for scientists and researchers to present the state of the art of biomedical engineering and informatics. Specific topics include Biomedical imaging and visualization; Biomedical signal processing and analysis; etc.



Periodicals related to Brainstem implants

Back to Top

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Both general and technical articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering; societal implications of medical technologies; current news items; book reviews; patent descriptions; and correspondence. Special interest departments, students, law, clinical engineering, ethics, new products, society news, historical features and government.


Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Rehabilitation aspects of biomedical engineering, including functional electrical stimulation, acoustic dynamics, human performance measurement and analysis, nerve stimulation, electromyography, motor control and stimulation, and hardware and software applications for rehabilitation engineering and assistive devices.


Proceedings of the IEEE

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics. This journal also holds the distinction of having the longest useful archival life of any EE or computer related journal in the world! Since 1913, the Proceedings of the IEEE has been the ...



Most published Xplore authors for Brainstem implants

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Brainstem implants

Back to Top

Finite element analysis of current and potential distributions for a human auditory brainstem implant

Proceedings of 17th International Conference of the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1995

A two-dimensional finite element model of the human head and brain stem has been developed to examine the current spread and electric fields generated during stimulation by an auditory brainstem implant. This model allows the authors to simulate different electrode positions and mono-polar or bi-polar stimulation modes. In each of the mono- or bi-polar modes, the cochlear nucleus complex (CNC) ...


Accessing cortical tonotopic organization by microstimulation of cochlear nucleus

First International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2003. Conference Proceedings., 2003

Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) that electrically stimulates the cochlear nucleus has been clinically used for rehabilitation of deaf patients with bilateral acoustic neuromas. A current prosthetic device, however, cannot evoke even pitch sensation and thus brings few benefits. The present work purposes to verify ABI capability by physiological experiments using rats. Our experimental system includes a spike microelectrode array for ...


An auditory prosthesis based on microstimulation in the cochlear nucleus: long-term stability of the implanted microelectrodes

Proceedings of the Second Joint 24th Annual Conference and the Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society] [Engineering in Medicine and Biology, 2002

The auditory brainstem implant (ABI) can restore useful hearing to patients in whom both auditory nerves have been destroyed by tumors of the V111th cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas), and who therefore cannot benefit from cochlear implants The present version of the ABI consists of 8 platinum-iridium electrodes implanted over the ventral cochlear nucleus. However, the overall auditory performance of patients ...


Cochlear and Brainstem Auditory Prostheses “Neural Interface for Hearing Restoration: Cochlear and Brain Stem Implants”

Proceedings of the IEEE, 2008

This paper discusses the development and implementation of three novel implantable technologies that have advanced the communication abilities of hearing-impaired individuals who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. This paper will discuss clinical indications and outcomes and include current technological limitations and future research efforts.


The past, present, and future of cochlear prostheses

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, 1999

The author discusses the accomplishments and challenges in treating sensorineurnal deafness through electrical stimulation.



Educational Resources on Brainstem implants

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Finite element analysis of current and potential distributions for a human auditory brainstem implant

    A two-dimensional finite element model of the human head and brain stem has been developed to examine the current spread and electric fields generated during stimulation by an auditory brainstem implant. This model allows the authors to simulate different electrode positions and mono-polar or bi-polar stimulation modes. In each of the mono- or bi-polar modes, the cochlear nucleus complex (CNC) is the targeted area for stimulation. A current source of 2 mA was used in all stimulation modes, with a neighboring electrode as the ground in bipolar cases and a ground electrode on the surface of the skull on the implant side for mono-polar modes. The potentials along a tonotopic line were plotted to estimate the potential difference across the auditory brainstem structures. By analyzing iso-potential contours and current density distributions in the CNC and surrounding area, the authors found that the bi- polar mode with both stimulating plates adjacent to the CNC produced the highest potential difference inside the auditory structure. Bipolar stimulation generates greater potential differences in the vicinity of the electrodes where the CNC is located, while mono-polar modes generate fields that spread over a wider area.

  • Accessing cortical tonotopic organization by microstimulation of cochlear nucleus

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) that electrically stimulates the cochlear nucleus has been clinically used for rehabilitation of deaf patients with bilateral acoustic neuromas. A current prosthetic device, however, cannot evoke even pitch sensation and thus brings few benefits. The present work purposes to verify ABI capability by physiological experiments using rats. Our experimental system includes a spike microelectrode array for cochlear nucleus microstimulation and a surface microelectrode array for mapping evoked- potentials over the auditory cortex. We compare pure-tone-evoked cortical potential patterns with those evoked by cochlear nucleus microstimulation. Our experimental results strongly suggest the microstimulation on the dorsal and ventral nuclei can access the cortical tonotopic organization, as acoustic stimuli do, possibly indicating the stimulation can evoke pitch sensation and thus substantially promising ABI capability.

  • An auditory prosthesis based on microstimulation in the cochlear nucleus: long-term stability of the implanted microelectrodes

    The auditory brainstem implant (ABI) can restore useful hearing to patients in whom both auditory nerves have been destroyed by tumors of the V111th cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas), and who therefore cannot benefit from cochlear implants The present version of the ABI consists of 8 platinum-iridium electrodes implanted over the ventral cochlear nucleus. However, the overall auditory performance of patients with this surface-electrode ABI is considerably poorer than the average performance of patients with a multi- channel cochlear implants. One possible explanation for this difference is the relatively poor access to the tonotopic axis of the cochlear nucleus, as compared to the cochlear implant. The objective of the present project has been to develop an auditory prosthesis that is based on microstimulation within the human ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The functionality of such a device is dependent on its ability to access the tonotopic axis of the human ventral cochlear nucleus in an orderly fashion, and its ability to excite the efferent projections from the VCN for a prolonged period without causing them injury or inducing excessive depression of their electrical excitability. We have addressed all of these issues in studies in which iridium microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the posteroventral cochlear nucleus of adult cats.

  • Cochlear and Brainstem Auditory Prostheses “Neural Interface for Hearing Restoration: Cochlear and Brain Stem Implants”

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of three novel implantable technologies that have advanced the communication abilities of hearing-impaired individuals who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. This paper will discuss clinical indications and outcomes and include current technological limitations and future research efforts.

  • The past, present, and future of cochlear prostheses

    The author discusses the accomplishments and challenges in treating sensorineurnal deafness through electrical stimulation.

  • Accessing ampli-tonotopic organization of rat auditory cortex by microstimulation of cochlear nucleus

    Auditory brainstem implants (ABI) that electrically stimulate the surface of cochlear nucleus have been clinically used for the rehabilitation of deaf patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas. The change of pitch perception with an active electrode location is not as clear in ABIs as in cochlear implants, a factor which might play a role in poorer speech performance in ABIs. The objective of present work was to develop an animal ABI model that could provide physiological data for future ABI development and optimization. The experimental system included a penetrating microelectrode array for microstimulation of the cochlear nucleus and a surface microelectrode array for mapping evoked potentials over the auditory cortex. We first obtained tone-evoked cortical activation patterns, which represented a place code of the frequency and intensity of test tones, i.e., the ampli-tonotopic organization, and compared the patterns with those evoked by cochlear nuclear microstimulation. Our experimental results demonstrated that microstimulation of both the dorsal and ventral cochlear nucleus (DCN and VCN) could access the cortical ampli-tonotopic organization as acoustic stimuli did. We also found that the cortical dynamic range was wider for the DCN than VCN stimulation and for the low-frequency than for the high-frequency pathway. The present results have great implications for improved ABI performance.

  • Neuronal Activity Evoked in the Inferior Colliculus of the Cat by Surface Macroelectrodes and Penetrating Microelectrodes Implanted in the Cochlear Nucleus

    Persons lacking functional auditory nerves cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) utilizing stimulating electrodes adjacent to or on their cochlear nucleus (CN) can restore some hearing. We are investigating the feasibility of supplementing these surface electrodes with penetrating microstimulating electrodes within the ventral CN (VCN), and how the two types of electrodes can be used synergistically. Multiunit neuronal responses evoked by VCN electrical stimulation with surface electrodes and microelectrodes were recorded in the inferior colliculus (ICC) of five cats. The findings are consistent with those from patients with type II neurofibromatosis who received ABIs with both surface and microelectrodes. The patients described percepts from their microelectrodes as more similar to pure tones than those from their surface electrodes, consistent with the greater tonotopic selectivity of microelectrodes in the cats' VCN. Also, the patients describe percepts from their surface electrodes as louder than those from the microelectrodes, while in the cat, the neuronal activity evoked in the ICC by the surface electrodes tended to be greater. This concordance helps to validate our cat model as a means of investigating the synergistic use of surface and penetrating electrodes in a clinical ABI.



Standards related to Brainstem implants

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Brainstem implants"