Carbon

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Carbon is the chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Carbon

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2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE 21st International Conference on Vacuum Electronics (IVEC)

Technical presentations will range from the fundamental physics of electron emission and modulated electron beams to the design and operation of devices at UHF to THz frequencies, theory and computational tool development, active and passive components, systems, and supporting technologies.System developers will find that IVEC provides a unique snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in vacuum electron devices. These devices continue to provide unmatched power and performance for advanced electromagnetic systems, particularly in the challenging frequency regimes of millimeter-wave and THz electronics.Plenary talks will provide insights into the history, the broad spectrum of fundamental physics, the scientific issues, and the technological applications driving the current directions in vacuum electronics research.


2020 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

The Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference is a major international conference focusing on educational innovations and research in engineering and computing education. FIE 2019 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in engineering and computing education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments and interacting with colleagues inthese fields.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


IGARSS 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

All fields of satellite, airborne and ground remote sensing.


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Periodicals related to Carbon

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Advanced Packaging, IEEE Transactions on

The IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging has its focus on the modeling, design, and analysis of advanced electronic, photonic, sensors, and MEMS packaging.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Automation Science and Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

The IEEE Transactions on Automation Sciences and Engineering (T-ASE) publishes fundamental papers on Automation, emphasizing scientific results that advance efficiency, quality, productivity, and reliability. T-ASE encourages interdisciplinary approaches from computer science, control systems, electrical engineering, mathematics, mechanical engineering, operations research, and other fields. We welcome results relevant to industries such as agriculture, biotechnology, healthcare, home automation, maintenance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, retail, ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Carbon

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Xplore Articles related to Carbon

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Resonant Tunneling Behaviour in the I-V Response of Multilayered Nanocarbon Based Field Assisted Electron Emitters

2006 19th International Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2006

Summary form only given. There is an increasing interest in carbon based nanostructured materials like the nanodiamond, nanotubes, nanocluster and nanowall carbon. The interest stems from the diverse fields of application envisaged for these materials which include, vacuum microelectronics, energy storage systems, MEMS, electronics, nanotechnology and sensors. Recently, these materials including nanocrystalline diamond, nanotubes and nanocluster carbon have all been ...


Ultrafast laser-induced field emission from a single carbon nanotube based nanotip

2015 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO), 2015

We present the first demonstration of ultrafast laser-induced field emission from a carbon nanotube based nanotip, and measurement of the energy distribution of the electrons.


Synthesis and field emission of high pure AlN nanowires

IVESC 2004. The 5th International Vacuum Electron Sources Conference Proceedings (IEEE Cat. No.04EX839), 2004

Ever since Spindt field emitter arrays were invented, great efforts have been devoted to explore novel electron sources for better and more reliable performance. In addition to carbon series (diamond films, diamond-like carbon films, carbon nanotubes, and etc.), the one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of group III nitrides, GaN, AlN, InN and their alloys, are expected to be a kind of promising ...


Low field electron emission from nanocluster carbon films grown using a pulsed trigger less cathodic arc process

IEEE/CPMT/SEMI. 28th International Electronics Manufacturing Technology Symposium (Cat. No.03CH37479), 2003

Nanostructured carbon based electron emitters are now in the forefront, as one of the best candidate for cold cathode based field emission applications. Various forms of carbon including, nano-diamond, carbon nanotubes, nanostructured graphite, nano horns, nanocluster carbon, diamond like carbon [DLC], tetrahedral amorphous carbon [ta-C], etc., have been all shown to emit electrons at reasonably low fields. These materials have ...


A comparison study of field assisted electron emission from nanocluster carbon films grown using a continuous and a pulsed cathodic arc process

2005 International Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2005

Field emission from nanoclustered carbon films grown using pulsed cathodic arc process is presented and compared with carbon films grown using continuous cathodic arc process. The samples exhibit relatively low field electron emission. However, films grown using pulsed arc process show slightly higher emission threshold compared to those grown using continuous cathodic arc process. This may be attributed to the ...


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Educational Resources on Carbon

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Resonant Tunneling Behaviour in the I-V Response of Multilayered Nanocarbon Based Field Assisted Electron Emitters

    Summary form only given. There is an increasing interest in carbon based nanostructured materials like the nanodiamond, nanotubes, nanocluster and nanowall carbon. The interest stems from the diverse fields of application envisaged for these materials which include, vacuum microelectronics, energy storage systems, MEMS, electronics, nanotechnology and sensors. Recently, these materials including nanocrystalline diamond, nanotubes and nanocluster carbon have all been widely reported as low field electron emitters. Most of these nanocarbons have been grown using high temperature process such as hot filament CVD, thermal CVD, microwave plasma CVD and Plasma CVD. In an effort to develop a low temperature grown carbon based field assisted electron emitters. We observe that under optimum conditions nanodiamond and nanocluster carbon based multilayered films exhibit relatively low field electron emission of 1 V/mum. Further, some of the samples seem to exhibit I-V characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region at room temperature conditions. This negative differential resistance or the resonant tunneling type behaviour was observed to be dependent on the nanoseeded diamond size and concentration for a given nanocluster carbon film. Further we observe similar behaviour in the case of thin silicon dioxide layer and carbon nanotube based multilayered electron emitters. Presented is a possible mechanism for such behaviour in these nanomaterial based multilayered devices

  • Ultrafast laser-induced field emission from a single carbon nanotube based nanotip

    We present the first demonstration of ultrafast laser-induced field emission from a carbon nanotube based nanotip, and measurement of the energy distribution of the electrons.

  • Synthesis and field emission of high pure AlN nanowires

    Ever since Spindt field emitter arrays were invented, great efforts have been devoted to explore novel electron sources for better and more reliable performance. In addition to carbon series (diamond films, diamond-like carbon films, carbon nanotubes, and etc.), the one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of group III nitrides, GaN, AlN, InN and their alloys, are expected to be a kind of promising candidates due to the combination of 1D geometries, small or even negative electron affinity (NEA) and adjustable bandgap which is beneficial for field emission. Our recent study did indicate the good field emission properties of AlN nanowires prepared by the extended vapor-liquid-solid growth (Wu et al., 2003). Herein we report a improved method to fabricate pure AlN nanowires. The white AlN nanowires were produced by the reaction of Al powder and carbon-coated Ni nanoparticles at 1400/spl deg/C and collected from the down-stream of the reaction tube. The products were well characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD and Raman spectrum. The field emission properties of AlN nanowires were measured in a vacuum chamber at a base pressure of /spl sim/1/spl times/10/sup -7/ Torr. The emission current-voltage (I-V) curve were repeatedly measured by a Keithley system for different distances (D) between the sample and anode. The I-V curve qualitatively follow the conventional Fowler-Nordheim behavior according to the straight line plot of log (J/E/sup 2/) versus I/E. The field emission mechanism is also discussed.

  • Low field electron emission from nanocluster carbon films grown using a pulsed trigger less cathodic arc process

    Nanostructured carbon based electron emitters are now in the forefront, as one of the best candidate for cold cathode based field emission applications. Various forms of carbon including, nano-diamond, carbon nanotubes, nanostructured graphite, nano horns, nanocluster carbon, diamond like carbon [DLC], tetrahedral amorphous carbon [ta-C], etc., have been all shown to emit electrons at reasonably low fields. These materials have been grown using different process like hot filament CVD, microwave plasma CVD, Plasma assisted DC discharge, cathodic arc etc., The need is for a low temperature, large areas capability, low cost process, compatible with silicon process technology. The Cathodic arc offers the unique opportunity of growing any form of carbon, from highly sp/sup 3/ bonded material like diamond to highly sp/sup 2/ bonded graphite like material such as carbon nanotube and all the intermediate stages including DLC, ta-C and nanoclusters at near room temperature. The process may also be scaled up, for large area film growth.

  • A comparison study of field assisted electron emission from nanocluster carbon films grown using a continuous and a pulsed cathodic arc process

    Field emission from nanoclustered carbon films grown using pulsed cathodic arc process is presented and compared with carbon films grown using continuous cathodic arc process. The samples exhibit relatively low field electron emission. However, films grown using pulsed arc process show slightly higher emission threshold compared to those grown using continuous cathodic arc process. This may be attributed to the difference in the energy kinetics of the arc initiation process. Raman measurements also show that films grown using continuous arc have better clusters and less amorphous phase leading to relatively more distinct G and D peaks compared to the broader G peak and shoulder indicating the D peak observed for films grown using a trigger less pulsed arc.

  • Pyrolytic carbon cathodes prepared by low temperature vapor deposition

    Fabrication of pyrolitic carbon field emission cathodes is presented. Pyrolitic carbon is deposited on two types of substrates, polished glass and grinding substrates, through the process of low temperature vapor deposition. Deposition process times are 30, 60, and 180 minutes resulting to pyrolitic carbon thickness of 70, 150, and 500 nm, respectively. Current-voltage characteristics are measured and results show that better emission properties are observed in lesser thickness of pyrolitic carbon.

  • Mechanism of electron field emission from diamond and diamond-like carbon

    Various types of carbon films such as diamond-like carbon are being intensively developed for use as flat film microcathodes for Field Emission displays. The original motivation for this work was the discovery that diamond surfaces can have a negative electron affinity (NEA), so there would be in principle no barrier for the emission of electrons from its conduction band into the vacuum. However, relatively easy field emission has now been observed in many carbon-based materials-diamond, nano-crystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon nanotubes-suggesting that NEA is not essential and more general mechanisms might apply.

  • Time and space resolved plasma species dynamics of a laser carbon plasma in low pressure neutral background gas

    Thin film deposition using laser produced plasmas has become a well established technique. In particular, carbon and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin film deposition using graphite targets has been investigated, using different parameter regimes. In particular, it has been found that morphological properties of thin carbon films growth with pulsed laser deposition in a low pressure neutral gas background strongly depends on the gas pressure. To unveil some of the plasma properties that lead to a particular thin film morphology, we have studied the time and space resolved evolution of the laser produced carbon plasma in low pressure Argon background, at 6.8 J/cm2fluence. In order to better understand the correlations between gas pressure and carbon film properties we have studied in further detail the dynamics and composition of laser produced carbon plasmas. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 µm, at different fluences, below 10 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, in different neutral background gases, Argon, Helium and Nitrogen, at pressures below 1.5 Torr. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution and ∼3 mm spatial resolution. 20 ns exposure time plasma imaging, filtered with 10 nm windows at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Faraday cups are used to characterize the energy spectra of the laser plasma ions. The carbon plasma emission is found to evolve from that characteristic of single ionized carbon, to a more complex one, where C2and C3molecular bands dominate. Several plasma fronts, with eitherionic or molecular composition, are seen to detach from the laser target plasma. Ionization of the background gas ahead of the initial laser plasma front is observed. The temporal and spatial features of the molecular carbon species evolution are found to be dependent on the actual gas pressure. Based on our observations we will present a general characterization of the dynamics of a laser produced carbon plasma in different low pressure neutral background dases.

  • Synthesis and field emission of high pure AlN nanowires

    Ever since Spindt field emitter arrays were invented, great efforts have been devoted to explore novel electron sources for better and more reliable performance. In addition to carbon series (diamond films, diamond-like carbon films, carbon nanotubes, and etc.), the one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of group III nitrides, GaN, AlN, InN and their alloys, are expected to be a kind of promising candidates due to the combination of 1D geometries, small or even negative electron affinity (NEA) and adjustable bandgap which is beneficial for field emission. Our recent study did indicate the good field emission properties of AlN nanowires prepared by the extended vapor-liquid-solid growth (Wu et al., 2003). Herein we report an improved method to fabricate pure AlN nanowires. The white AlN nanowires were produced by the reaction of Al powder and carbon-coated Ni nanoparticles at 1400/spl deg/C and collected from the down-stream of the reaction tube. The products were well characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD and Raman spectrum. The field emission properties of AlN nanowires were measured in a vacuum chamber at a base pressure of /spl sim/1/spl times/10/sup -7/ Torr. The emission current-voltage (I-V) curve were repeatedly measured by a Keithley system for different distances (D) between the sample and anode. The I-V curve qualitatively follow the conventional Fowler-Nordheim behavior according to the straight line plot of log (J/E/sup 2/) versus J/E. The field emission mechanism is also discussed.

  • Stratified carbon film for large current emission synthesized by a local heating CVD method and its growth mechanism

    In order to fulfill the requirements of large current field emission, a kind of stratified carbon film has been synthesized by local heating chemical vapor deposition method. In this stratified structure, carbon fibers with the diameter of more than 500nm have been formed and intertwined with each other as conductive net; carbon nanotubes with the diameter about less than 30nm can be synthesized around the fibers as the field emitters. From the scanning electron microscopy pictures, we can see that the main growth process of carbon fiber is top-down mode, while carbon nanotubes were synthesized on the body of carbon fiber with defect growth mechanism. Field emission tests show that this kind of structure with low turn-on field and large current emission ability.