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IEEE Draft Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques

IEEE P1528/D6, March 2013, 2013

IEEE Std 1528-200X specifies protocols and test procedures for the measurement ofthe peak spatial-average SAR induced inside a simplified model of the head of users of certainhandheld radio transceivers. These transceivers are intended to be used for personal wirelesscommunications services, operate in the 300 MHz to 6 GHz frequency range, and are intended tobe operated while held against the ear. ...


IEC/IEEE Approved Draft International Standard - Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz Part 3: Specific Requirements for using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method for SAR Calculations of Mobile Phones

IEC/IEEE P62704-3/D4, 2017, 2017

This International Standard IEC/IEEE 62704-3 describes the concepts, techniques, benchmark phone models, validation procedures, uncertainties and limitations of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in standardized head and body phantoms exposed to the electromagnetic fields generated by wireless communication devices, in particular mobile phones, in the frequency range ...


IEC/IEEE Draft International Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 1: General Requirements for using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method for SAR Calculations

P62704-1_D3, August 2016, 2016

This part of IEC/IEEE 62704 defines the methodology for the application of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human body exposed to wireless communication devices with known uncertainty. It defines methods to validate the numerical model of the device under test (DUT) and to assess its ...


IEEE Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques

IEEE Std 1528-2013 (Revision of IEEE Std 1528-2003), 2013

Protocols and test procedures are specified for the measurement of the peak spatial-average SAR induced inside a simplified model of the head of users of certain handheld radio transceivers. These transceivers are intended to be used for personal wireless communications services, operate in the 300 MHz to 6 GHz frequency range, and are intended to be operated while held against ...


IEEE/IEC Draft International Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 2: Specific Requirements for Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Modelling of Exposure from Vehicle Mounted Antennas

IEC/IEEE P62704-2/D2.1, May 2013, 2013

This standard describes the concepts, techniques, vehicle models, validation procedures, uncertainties and limitations of the finite-difference time-domain technique (FDTD) when used for determining the spatial-peak specific absorption rate (SAR) in standardized human anatomical models exposed to vehicle mounted antennas. Recommended vehicle models and general benchmark data for these models are provided. Antenna locations, operatingconfigurations, exposure conditions and positions of persons ...


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IEEE.tv Videos

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  • IEEE Draft Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques

    IEEE Std 1528-200X specifies protocols and test procedures for the measurement ofthe peak spatial-average SAR induced inside a simplified model of the head of users of certainhandheld radio transceivers. These transceivers are intended to be used for personal wirelesscommunications services, operate in the 300 MHz to 6 GHz frequency range, and are intended tobe operated while held against the ear. The results obtained by following the protocols specifiedin this recommended practice represent a conservative estimate of the peak spatial-average SARinduced in the head of a significant majority of persons, subject to measurement and otheruncertainties that are defined in this standard. The results are representative of those expectedduring conditions of intended use of a handheld wireless device. It is not the intent of thisrecommended practice to provide a result representative of the absolute maximum SAR valuepossible under every conceivable combination of head size, head shape, handset orientation, andspacing relative to the head. The measurement of SAR induced in the external tissues of thehead, e.g., the external ear (pinna), is not addressed in this standard. This standard also does notaddress the body SAR measurements typically required for wireless handsets. The followingitems are described in detail: measurement concepts, measurement techniques, instruments,calibration techniques, simulated-tissue (phantom) models, including homogeneous anatomically-equivalent models of the human head and simple phantoms for validation of the SARmeasurement system, and the limitations of these systems when used for measuring the spatialpeakmass-averaged SAR. Procedures for calibrating electric field (E-field) probes used for SARmeasurements and assessing the SAR measurement and system uncertainties are provided inthe annexes. This recommended practice is intended primarily for use by engineers and otherspecialists who are familiar with electromagnetic (EM) theory and SAR measurement techniques.This standard does not recommend specific SAR limit values since these are found in otherdocuments. The benefits to the users include standardized and accepted protocols, validationtechniques, and means for estimating the overall measurement uncertainty in order to producevalid and repeatable data.

  • IEC/IEEE Approved Draft International Standard - Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz Part 3: Specific Requirements for using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method for SAR Calculations of Mobile Phones

    This International Standard IEC/IEEE 62704-3 describes the concepts, techniques, benchmark phone models, validation procedures, uncertainties and limitations of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in standardized head and body phantoms exposed to the electromagnetic fields generated by wireless communication devices, in particular mobile phones, in the frequency range from 30 MHz to 6 GHz. It recommends and provides guidance on the numerical modeling of mobile phones and benchmark results to verif y the general approach for the numerical simulations of such devices. It defines acceptable modeling requirements, guidance on meshing and test positions of the mobile phone and the phantom models. This document will not recommend specific SAR limits since these are found in other documents, e.g., IEEE C95.1-2005[1] and ICNIRP[2].

  • IEC/IEEE Draft International Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 1: General Requirements for using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method for SAR Calculations

    This part of IEC/IEEE 62704 defines the methodology for the application of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human body exposed to wireless communication devices with known uncertainty. It defines methods to validate the numerical model of the device under test (DUT) and to assess its uncertainty when used in SAR simulations. Moreover, it defines procedures to determine the peak spatial-average SAR in a cubical volume and to validate the correct implementation of the FDTD simulation software. The applicable frequency range is 30 MHz to 6 GHz. This part of IEC/IEEE 62704 does not recommend specific SAR limits since these are found elsewhere, for example, in the guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) [1] or in IEEE C95.1 [3]

  • IEEE Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques

    Protocols and test procedures are specified for the measurement of the peak spatial-average SAR induced inside a simplified model of the head of users of certain handheld radio transceivers. These transceivers are intended to be used for personal wireless communications services, operate in the 300 MHz to 6 GHz frequency range, and are intended to be operated while held against the ear. The results obtained by following the protocols specified in this recommended practice represent a conservative estimate of the peak spatial- average SAR induced in the head of a significant majority of persons, subject to measurement and other uncertainties that are defined in this recommended practice. The results are representative of those expected during conditions of intended use of a handheld wireless device. It is not the intent of this recommended practice to provide a result representative of the absolute maximum SAR value possible under every conceivable combination of head size, head shape, handset orientation, and spacing relative to the head. The measurement of SAR induced in the external tissues of the head, e.g., the external ear (pinna), is not addressed in this document. This recommended practice also does not address the body SAR measurements typically required for wireless handsets. The following items are described in detail: measurement concepts, measurement techniques, instruments, calibration techniques, simulated-tissue (phantom) models, including homogeneous anatomically equivalent models of the human head and simple phantoms for validation of the SAR measurement system, and the limitations of these systems when used for measuring the spatial-peak mass-averaged SAR. Procedures for calibrating electric field (E-field) probes used for SAR measurements and assessing the SAR measurement and system uncertainties are

  • IEEE/IEC Draft International Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 2: Specific Requirements for Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Modelling of Exposure from Vehicle Mounted Antennas

    This standard describes the concepts, techniques, vehicle models, validation procedures, uncertainties and limitations of the finite-difference time-domain technique (FDTD) when used for determining the spatial-peak specific absorption rate (SAR) in standardized human anatomical models exposed to vehicle mounted antennas. Recommended vehicle models and general benchmark data for these models are provided. Antenna locations, operatingconfigurations, exposure conditions and positions of persons exposed to the vehicle mounted antennas are defined. Intended users of this practice are (but are not be limited to) wireless communication devices manufacturers, service providers for wireless communication that are required to certify that their products comply with the applicable SAR limits and government agencies. Specific SAR limit values (basic restrictions) are not included since these are found in other documents, e.g., IEEE C95.1-2005 and IEEE C95.1a-2010.

  • IEC/IEEE Draft Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 3: Specific Requirements for Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Modeling of Mobile Phones/Personal Wireless Devices

    This International Standard IEC/IEEE 62704-3 describes the concepts, techniques, phone models, validation procedures, uncertainties and limitations of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in standardized human anatomical models exposed to the electromagnetic fields generated by the personal wireless communication devices, in particular handheld mobile phones, in the frequency range from 30 MHz to 6 GHz. It recommends and provides guidance on the numerical modeling of mobile wireless communication devices and benchmark data to verify the numerical simulations of such devices. It defines acceptable modeling requirements, guidance on meshing and test positions of the anatomical models. This document will not recommend specific SAR limits since these are found in other documents, e.g., IEEE C95.1-2005 and ICNIRP.

  • IEC/IEEE Draft Standard for Determining the Peak Spatial Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Body from Wireless Communications Devices, 30 MHz - 6 GHz. Part 1: General Requirements for using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Method for SAR Calculations

    The scope of this standard is to define the methodology for the application of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when used for determining the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human body exposed to wireless communication devices with known uncertainty. It defines methods to validate the numerical model of the device under test (DUT) and to assess its uncertainty when used in SAR simulations. Moreover, it defines procedures to determine the peak spatial average SAR in a cubical volume and to validate the correct implementation of the FDTD simulation software. This document will not recommend specific SAR limits since these are found elsewhere, e.g., in the guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) or in IEEE C95.1.

  • Evaluation of SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) in multilayer structure of biological tissues near ear with cochlear implant

    The effects of EMF (Electromagnetic fields) in RF (Radiofrequency field) band to cochlear implant is analysed. This is presented by evaluating of SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) in multilayer structure of skin with cochlear implant in simulation software CST Studio Suite.

  • Comparison Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) for Human Head between 2G and 4G Mobile Communication

    Comparison the specific absorption rate of the human head model between the second generation (2G)and the fourth generation (4G) of mobile phone communication. rectangular micro strip patch antenna was designed and operated at (1.8 & 2.3) GHz for Global system of mobile communication (GSM)and long term evolution (LTE) applications respectively. Placing the antenna close to the human head model and all the simulation executed using the CST program. The obtained results for the comparison in the second generation is smallest from the specific absorption rate level in the fourth generation, and the specific absorption rate level in (2G and 4G) well below the limitation value recommended by FCC and IEEE.

  • Specific absorption rate (SAR) evaluation of human body model in the presence of radar wave radiation on a warship deck

    High power electromagnetic radiation may cause certain damage on human body working on a warship deck. Therefore, it is very important to accurately characterize such radiation effect so as to further protect the human body in an appropriate way. In this paper, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method together with the technique for treating dielectric boundaries is employed for numerically characterizing specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution of a human body model in the presence of high power radar wave radiation on the warship deck. In particular, the relations between SAR distribution and incident radar wave parameters are examined and compared, including the incident wave angle, polarization state and its strength. Also, accumulated power in the human body is evaluated as a function of incident or action time of the incident radar wave.



Standards related to Specific Absorption Rate (sar)

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IEEE Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques

To specify protocols for the measurement of the peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (SAR) in a simplified model of the head of users of hand-held radio transceivers used for personal wireless communications services and intended to be operated while held next to the ear. It applies to contemporary and future devices with the same or similar operational characteristics as contemporary ...


IEEE Recommended Practice for Determining the Peak Spatial-Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in the Human Head from Wireless Communications Devices: Measurement Techniques - Amendment 1: CAD File for Human Head Model (SAM Phantom)

The scope of IEEE Std 1528 is to specify protocols for the measurement of the peak spatial-average SAR in a simplified model of the head of users of handheld radio transceivers used for personal wireless communications services and intended to be operated while held next to the ear. This amendment addresses ambiguity in the language of certain sections and provides ...


IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz

Recommendations are made to protect against established adverse health effects in human beings associated with exposure to electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in the frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz. The recommendations are expressed in terms of basic restrictions (BRs) and maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values. The BRs are limits on internal fields, specific absorption rate (SAR), and ...



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