Conferences related to Biomedical Engineering

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2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.


2019 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2019, the 26th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

The conference covers all aspects of the technology associated with ultrasound generation and detection and their applications.


2019 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

This conference is the annual premier meeting on the use of instrumentation in the Nuclear and Medical fields. The meeting has a very long history of providing an exciting venue for scientists to present their latest advances, exchange ideas, renew existing collaboration and form new ones. The NSS portion of the conference is an ideal forum for scientists and engineers in the field of Nuclear Science, radiation instrumentation, software engineering and data acquisition. The MIC is one of the most informative venues on the state-of-the art use of physics, engineering, and mathematics in Nuclear Medicine and related imaging modalities, such as CT and increasingly so MRI, through the development of hybrid devices


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Periodicals related to Biomedical Engineering

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Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Computing in Science & Engineering

Physics, medicine, astronomy—these and other hard sciences share a common need for efficient algorithms, system software, and computer architecture to address large computational problems. And yet, useful advances in computational techniques that could benefit many researchers are rarely shared. To meet that need, Computing in Science & Engineering (CiSE) presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format. ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Biomedical Engineering

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Xplore Articles related to Biomedical Engineering

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Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan

2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2014

Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a ...


Biomedical Engineering Education in the Middle East and North Africa

2nd Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering, 2014

This paper is an empirical study that aims to characterize the similarities/differences among existing biomedical engineering curricula in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The work is based on an earlier study entitled “Project Alexander the Great” that identifies 29 institutions of higher learning within this region, offering degree programs or options in Biomedical Engineering. The objective is to ...


The role of a creative “joint assignment” project in biomedical engineering bachelor degree education

2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2017

Biomedical Engineering (BME) bachelor education aims to train qualified engineers who devote themselves to addressing biological and medical problems by integrating the technological, medical and biological knowledge. Design thinking and teamwork with other disciplines are necessary for biomedical engineers. In the current biomedical engineering education system of Shanghai University (SHU), however, such design thinking and teamwork through a practical project ...


Engaging with the Medical community in Biomedical Engineering research

The 4th 2011 Biomedical Engineering International Conference, 2012

Achieving quality outcomes from our Biomedical Engineering research relies on effective engagement with the Medical community. This typically takes the form of collaborative research with clinicians, or clinician-researchers, on issues they identify. While this presents opportunities, there are also significant challenges, and the goal of effective engagement and collaboration can be difficult to achieve. Engaging is a complex process - ...


Hands-on curriculum teaches biomedical engineering concepts to home-schooled students

2009 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2009

University level outreach has increased over the last decade to stimulate K-12 student interest in engineering related fields. Home schooling students are one of the groups that are valued for engineering admissions due to diligent study habits and high achievement scores. However, home schooled students have inadequate access to science, math, and engineering related resources, which precludes the development of ...


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Educational Resources on Biomedical Engineering

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue- learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan.

  • Biomedical Engineering Education in the Middle East and North Africa

    This paper is an empirical study that aims to characterize the similarities/differences among existing biomedical engineering curricula in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The work is based on an earlier study entitled “Project Alexander the Great” that identifies 29 institutions of higher learning within this region, offering degree programs or options in Biomedical Engineering. The objective is to evaluate the curricula of the identified institutions as to their adherence to three major curriculum philosophies: i) VaNTH-ERC (Vanderbilt-Northwestern-Texas-Harvard/MIT Engineering Research Center) Education Mission for Bioengineering and Educational Technologies, ii) Whitaker Curriculum Philosophy, and iii) Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Curriculum Philosophy-ABET EC2000. The obtained results reveal that these programs are, to a certain degree, compliant with the requirements of the abovementioned philosophies. As such, the MENA region is witnessing a healthy academic growth and interest in the Biomedical Engineering field. The paper concludes with a referral to a different study by Abu-Faraj that provides a collection of recommendations and strategies to be implemented by entities which are planning to introduce state-of-the-art curricula in this vital field within the MENA region.

  • The role of a creative “joint assignment” project in biomedical engineering bachelor degree education

    Biomedical Engineering (BME) bachelor education aims to train qualified engineers who devote themselves to addressing biological and medical problems by integrating the technological, medical and biological knowledge. Design thinking and teamwork with other disciplines are necessary for biomedical engineers. In the current biomedical engineering education system of Shanghai University (SHU), however, such design thinking and teamwork through a practical project is lacking. This paper describes a creative “joint assignment” project in Shanghai University, China, which has provided BME bachelor students a two-year practical experience to work with students from multidisciplinary departments including sociology, mechanics, computer sciences, business and art, etc. To test the feasibility of this project, a twenty-month pilot project has been carried out from May 2015 to December 2016. The results showed that this pilot project obviously enhanced competitive power of BME students in Shanghai University, both in the capabilities of design thinking and teamwork.

  • Engaging with the Medical community in Biomedical Engineering research

    Achieving quality outcomes from our Biomedical Engineering research relies on effective engagement with the Medical community. This typically takes the form of collaborative research with clinicians, or clinician-researchers, on issues they identify. While this presents opportunities, there are also significant challenges, and the goal of effective engagement and collaboration can be difficult to achieve. Engaging is a complex process - not only does it bring a “second party” into the research, but the project itself becomes more complex. Here we aim to promote engagement and stimulate discussion by considering the process and challenges together with relevant examples. We can identify a number of stages in the process of typical clinically-relevant research. The first is the preliminary stage of establishing the collaboration, including identifying appropriate potential clinical partners, identifying the real medical needs, educating biomedical engineers on the required medical knowledge and the surrounding medical culture, and developing mutual understanding and trust between engineering researchers and clinicians. The next stage is defining the problem and issues, and the specific aims and methods for the research. A further stage is attracting sufficient funding and competent research personnel. Subsequent stages are undertaking the core technical developments, gaining appropriate ethical and regulatory approvals, conducting an experimental program and trials, and finally, potentially commercialising developed technology. A particular challenge for clinicians is to invest the required time and energy in the process. Government, professional and personal incentives for clinicians to be involved in successful collaborative research programs are key factors. Two case study projects are given as examples. The first involves collaborative research in hospital-based neonatal care. This project comprises research into methods and technology directed at improving the delivery of supplementary oxygen to premature babies, including logging data from babies to assess the performance of current systems, and prototyping an improved oxygen controller. The second case study involves collaborative research in drug addiction rehabilitation with local community-based clinicians. The research in this project relates to improving the safety of take-home narcotic substitute medication. This includes development of technology for secure storage and delivery of the medication and remote assessment of patients, gaining ethics and regulatory approvals for patient trials, conducting trials and analysing results. Despite inherent difficulties, the case studies illustrate that the benefits of engagement are substantial, and the insight and expert knowledge of clinician- researchers is paramount to achieving quality outcomes. It is hoped that by exposing the issues, difficulties and benefits of engaging the Medical community, wider discussion will be promoted and effective collaboration encouraged.

  • Hands-on curriculum teaches biomedical engineering concepts to home-schooled students

    University level outreach has increased over the last decade to stimulate K-12 student interest in engineering related fields. Home schooling students are one of the groups that are valued for engineering admissions due to diligent study habits and high achievement scores. However, home schooled students have inadequate access to science, math, and engineering related resources, which precludes the development of interdisciplinary teaching methods. To address this problem, we have developed a hands-on, STEM based curriculum as a safe and comprehensive supplement to current home schooling curricula. The ultimate goal is to stimulate university-student relations and subsequently increase engineering recruitment opportunities. Our pre and post workshop survey comparisons demonstrate that integrating disciplines, via the manner presented in this study, provides a K-12 student-friendly engineering learning method.

  • Enhanced laboratory exercises for biomedical engineering courses

    Laboratory exercises are a basic premise of quality experience in the practical education of biomedical engineering specialists and physicians. An increasing number of students and reorganized curricula require innovative approaches to laboratory experiments. Four laboratory exercises have been defined and added into the syllabus of the course, “Models in Biomedical Engineering”. They include system identification on example of mechanical ventilation, feedback control in biological systems, signal models on example of blood pressure and flow velocity for assessment of cerebral autoregulation, and process models on example of pacemaker therapy. These complex topics were implemented to an e-learning project in order to enhance and simplify learning. Using the authoring tool IDEA an e-learning tutorial could achieve this goal. Online tutorials composed of structured theory explanation, interactive exercises and tests allowed students to learn according to their pace and time. So the tutor could concentrate on those topics, which were problematic for the students, comprehensive user tracking was successfully utilized.

  • Biomedical Engineering and Society: Policy and Ethics

    Biomedical engineering impacts health care and contributes to fundamental knowledge in medicine and biology. Policy, such as through regulation and research funding, has the potential to dramatically affect biomedical engineering research and commercialization. New developments, in turn, may affect society in new ways. The intersection of biomedical engineering and society and related policy issues must be discussed between scientists and engineers, policy-makers and the public. As a student, there are many ways to become engaged in the issues surrounding science and technology policy. At the University of Washington in Seattle, the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy (FOSEP, www.fosep.org) was started by graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in improving the dialogue between scientists, policymakers and the public and has received support from upper-level administration. This is just one example of how students can start thinking about science policy and ethics early in their careers.

  • Academic program models for undergraduate biomedical engineering

    There is a proliferation of medical devices across the globe for the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Biomedical engineering (BME) plays a significant role in healthcare and advancing medical technologies thus creating a substantial demand for biomedical engineers at undergraduate and graduate levels. There has been a surge in undergraduate programs due to increasing demands from the biomedical industries to cover many of their segments from bench to bedside. With the requirement of multidisciplinary training within allottable duration, it is indeed a challenge to design a comprehensive standardized undergraduate BME program to suit the needs of educators across the globe. This paper's objective is to describe three major models of undergraduate BME programs and their curricular requirements, with relevant recommendations to be applicable in institutions of higher education located in varied resource settings. Model 1 is based on programs to be offered in large research-intensive universities with multiple focus areas. The focus areas depend on the institution's research expertise and training mission. Model 2 has basic segments similar to those of Model 1, but the focus areas are limited due to resource constraints. In this model, co-op/internship in hospitals or medical companies is included which prepares the graduates for the work place. In Model 3, students are trained to earn an Associate Degree in the initial two years and they are trained for two more years to be BME's or BME Technologists. This model is well suited for the resource-poor countries. All three models must be designed to meet applicable accreditation requirements. The challenges in designing undergraduate BME programs include manpower, facility and funding resource requirements and time constraints. Each academic institution has to carefully analyze its short term and long term requirements. In conclusion, three models for BME programs are described based on large universities, colleges, and community colleges. Model 1 is suitable for research-intensive universities. Models 2 and 3 can be successfully implemented in higher education institutions with low and limited resources with appropriate guidance and support from international organizations. The models will continually evolve mainly to meet the industry needs.

  • Collaboration for cooperative work experience programs in biomedical engineering education

    Incorporating cooperative education modules as a segment of the undergraduate educational program is aimed to assist students in gaining real-life experience in the field of their choice. The cooperative work modules facilitate the students in exploring different realistic aspects of work processes in the field. The track records for cooperative learning modules are very positive. However, it is indeed a challenge for the faculty developing Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum to include cooperative work experience or internship requirements coupled with a heavy course load through the entire program. The objective of the present work is to develop a scheme for collaborative co-op work experience for the undergraduate training in the fast-growing BME programs. A few co-op/internship models are developed for the students pursuing undergraduate BME degree. The salient features of one co-op model are described. The results obtained support the proposed scheme. In conclusion, the cooperative work experience will be an invaluable segment in biomedical engineering education and an appropriate model has to be selected to blend with the overall training program.

  • A novel graduate program in biomedical engineering at King Abdulaziz University to meet the local needs

    The M. Sc. program in biomedical engineering at KAAU is designed to combine areas of technology, biology and medicine to improve the quality of life. The department offers the only BSc and MSc Biomedical Engineering program in Saudi Arabia. The new graduate program extends the existing B. Sc. program and focuses on four tracks namely bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, medical informatics and clinical engineering to address the local needs. It has non- thesis and also the thesis option that integrates research - into-innovative products, processes and methods for use in healthcare and clinical practice including the design, development, production and application. A sizable number of 28 elective courses enable students to customize their careers and areas of interests throughout the program. The role and need of this indigenous program is discussed.