Conferences related to Electrical Safety

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2021 IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


2020 22nd European Conference on Power Electronics and Applications (EPE'20 ECCE Europe)

Energy conversion and conditioning technologies, power electronics, adjustable speed drives and their applications, power electronics for smarter grid, energy efficiency,technologies for sustainable energy systems, converters and power supplies


2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 59th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)

The CDC is the premier conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of systems and control. The CDC annually brings together an international community of researchers and practitioners in the field of automatic control to discuss new research results, perspectives on future developments, and innovative applications relevant to decision making, automatic control, and related areas.


2020 IEEE 16th International Workshop on Advanced Motion Control (AMC)

AMC2020 is the 16th in a series of biennial international workshops on Advanced Motion Control which aims to bring together researchers from both academia and industry and to promote omnipresent motion control technologies and applications.


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Periodicals related to Electrical Safety

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Components and Packaging Technologies, IEEE Transactions on

Component parts, hybrid microelectronics, materials, packaging techniques, and manufacturing technology.


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


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Most published Xplore authors for Electrical Safety

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Xplore Articles related to Electrical Safety

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Improving workplace Electrical Safety through Self-Assessment

2013 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, 2013

An effective electrical safety program is the key to reducing electrical injuries in the workplace. The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) has developed a new workplace safety awareness program to assist safety professionals and facility managers with the development or improvement of electrical safety programs. Encouraging a proactive approach to electrical safety, the How Do You Know? program features high-quality ...


Electrical safety audit findings Do's & Don'ts

2014 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, 2014

Often overlooked in a company's Electrical Safety Program is the need to audit the Electrical Safety Program and the implemented preventive and protective control measures to mitigate or reduce the risk of exposure to workers to the electrical hazards of arc flash and shock to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP). Findings from Electrical Safety Audits provide evidence and measurable ...


Reinvigorating electrical safety

2011 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, 2011

As our lives evolve to include more advanced technologies, our reliance on electricity continues to grow. The U.S. Energy Administration (EIA) predicts an increase in electricity consumption of 4.0% for 2010 [1], with total U.S. consumption from all segments totaling 3890 billion kilowatt hours for the year [2]. Increased electricity usage translates to an increased potential for electricity-related deaths, injuries ...


Application of Work Flow Process in an Electrical Safety Program

2017 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop (ESW), 2017

It's all about the work task! Is it a reactive or planned electrical work task or job? Has a Work Order been issued? Is the work energized or not and if the assigned work task is energized what does the Qualified Electrical Worker (QEW) have to do to execute it as outlined in an employer's overall Occupational Health & Safety ...


An effective electrical safety program — What are you missing?

2012 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, 2012

The purpose of this paper is to cover the process for development, implementation, and maintenance of an electrical safety program. It includes key elements of an electrical safety program and provides information on where the gaps may be in your existing program.


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Educational Resources on Electrical Safety

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Improving workplace Electrical Safety through Self-Assessment

    An effective electrical safety program is the key to reducing electrical injuries in the workplace. The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) has developed a new workplace safety awareness program to assist safety professionals and facility managers with the development or improvement of electrical safety programs. Encouraging a proactive approach to electrical safety, the How Do You Know? program features high-quality video modules that reinforce the importance of electrical safety programs and compliance with standards and regulations, while also demonstrating the personal impact workplace electrical incidents can have on an organization and its employees. The How Do You Know? program also includes an online assessment tool that promotes self-evaluation as a method for improving workplace electrical safety. The ESFI Electrical Safety Self-Assessment guides users though a series of questions that help them review and analyze electrical safety practices related to facilities, personnel and procedures. Once the assessment is complete, users are provided with a summary of areas that have been identified for further examination or improvement.

  • Electrical safety audit findings Do's & Don'ts

    Often overlooked in a company's Electrical Safety Program is the need to audit the Electrical Safety Program and the implemented preventive and protective control measures to mitigate or reduce the risk of exposure to workers to the electrical hazards of arc flash and shock to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP). Findings from Electrical Safety Audits provide evidence and measurable results to electrical safety performance, which is critical for continuous improvement. [1][2][3][4][6][9][10][11][12][13][14].

  • Reinvigorating electrical safety

    As our lives evolve to include more advanced technologies, our reliance on electricity continues to grow. The U.S. Energy Administration (EIA) predicts an increase in electricity consumption of 4.0% for 2010 [1], with total U.S. consumption from all segments totaling 3890 billion kilowatt hours for the year [2]. Increased electricity usage translates to an increased potential for electricity-related deaths, injuries and property loss. Electrical hazards in the home and workplace result in an average of more than 850 deaths, 5,500 injuries and 62,000 fires annually [3, 4, 5, 6]. The mission of the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) is to advocate electrical safety at home and at work. In response to changing population demographics and the increased availability of computer technologies, ESFI has reevaluated the way electrical safety awareness materials have historically been presented. New materials provide a more dynamic approach to learning through the use of tools such as virtual demonstrations and interactive web-based activities. Other advancements are the availability of downloads and internet viewing, which allow for more widespread use without the costs traditionally associated with safety awareness materials. These reduced cost approaches come at a good time for employers, consumers and community leaders who are still recovering from the recent period of economic instability.

  • Application of Work Flow Process in an Electrical Safety Program

    It's all about the work task! Is it a reactive or planned electrical work task or job? Has a Work Order been issued? Is the work energized or not and if the assigned work task is energized what does the Qualified Electrical Worker (QEW) have to do to execute it as outlined in an employer's overall Occupational Health & Safety Management System (OHSMS) and associated Electrical Safety Program (ESP). The requirements of the CSA Z462 and NFPA 70E Standards must be addressed in the execution of the work task. Documentation must be used before, during and after the work task has been executed. This set of documents forms the “Work Package” for the assigned work task. The process of executing the energized electrical work task has a natural flow of required steps and when all steps are completed provides the best due diligence for employer and employee and ensures the requirements of the employer's Electrical Safety Program are met. Does your company's Electrical Safety Program provide a focus on the work task and what is required to be done to execute the work task?

  • An effective electrical safety program — What are you missing?

    The purpose of this paper is to cover the process for development, implementation, and maintenance of an electrical safety program. It includes key elements of an electrical safety program and provides information on where the gaps may be in your existing program.

  • Educating students in electrical safety practices and the inclusion of electrical safety material in academic curriculum

    Electrical safety practices are often an afterthought in college curriculum as there is little emphasis on training students to work in an electrically safe manner during their studies. Due to the lack of training and absence of any courses on this topic, students may be more susceptible to electrical injuries as they do not fully recognize the hazards. This paper presents the integration of electrical safe work practices into a college curriculum and laboratory practice to ensure the safety of the students while they learn the theoretical concepts. The students are taught key electrical safety concepts and will be exposed to some applications of the safety standards. Authors will suggest their approaches to get students involved and provide examples of their teaching experience. In addition, a special topics course is developed specifically to introduce students to arc flash and its associated hazards. This course also teaches students standard industry practices to reduce the incident energy levels and hazardous exposure using applicable software packages.

  • Electrical safety leadership

    This paper will attempt to define what electrical safety leadership is and how it can be used to make significant changes. If there is to be continuing change in the electrical safety culture, there need to be leaders who are willing to take up the cause. Leadership is not something that is appointed or assigned, but is something that is earned as a result of knowledge, abilities, and commitment. Leadership is needed at the individual level, site level, corporate level, and societal level. Leaders need to be recruiting and developing other leaders to spread the level of influence in changing the electrical safety culture. Organizations such as the Petroleum Chemical Industry Committee (PCIC) and the Electrical Safety Workshop (ESW) should be developing electrical safety leaders. This paper will also attempt to outline some steps that can be taken to develop electrical safety leaders.

  • Change management and your electrical safety program

    A Change Agent understands that their job is not done when their Electrical Safety Program (“ESP”) is approved and funded; in fact their job has just begun. The long-term success and sustainability of an ESP, as with any organizational change, depends on how well people throughout the impacted culture accept and adopt the change(s). But, as we all know from personal experience, change can be unsettling or upsetting to people who feel that change is being thrust upon them. So how do successful “Change Agents” do it? How do they lead entire organizations to adopt new work processes, new job requirements, new department configurations? The change management principals needed to lead a team through rapid growth, or downsizing are similar to those required when a management team sets out to change the culture of electrical safety in their organization. This paper will explore the principals and processes needed to become an effective Change Agent. Note: This paper builds off the one delivered at the 2012 ESW, “Selling Electrical Safety in Your Organization.” However, the concepts herein do not require a prior knowledge of that paper.

  • Toward a more globally effective standard for occupational electrical safety

    Electrical safety is highly regulated in all industrialized countries. There is both commonality and differences in electrical safety standards and regulations country to country. This paper suggests a path forward to compare standards and regulations applicable in North America (NFPA70E, CSAZ462, ANSI/IEEE C2), Europe (EN 50110), Brazil (NR 10) and China (DL 408), and benchmark against the comprehensive hazard mitigation measures contained in ANSI Z10 occupational safety and health management systems, which is harmonized with other safety management systems standards recognized globally. By comparing these standards against recognized safety management systems standards, such as ANSI Z10, it will identify gaps in electrical safety management. The comparison will highlight unique differences in the electrical safety standards, and will identify opportunities for improving individual standards.

  • Leadership in electrical safety comes from the “12<sup>th</sup>Man”

    This paper discusses how leadership qualities of the “12thMan” can improve electrical safety in your organization. Emotionally involving and committing everyone to safety at the level of a truly dedicated fan takes a game plan. The most effective work comes from high performance teams who value trust, communication, problem solving, and shared leadership roles. Job satisfaction is derived from involvement, contribution, and the feelings that come from making a difference. Every person can play a part in creating a superior safe work environment. The attainment of higher performance through the electrical safety program should begin with “Why not me, Why not us?” [2]. Everyone has the opportunity to be a role model, to be involved in mentoring, to set personal goals, to participate in training, education, and share their ideas to improve safety. Personal growth and industry knowledge can be expanded through involvement in conferences and committees. Being a “12thMan” for electrical safety takes a higher level of commitment; it takes action, perseverance, and passion.



Standards related to Electrical Safety

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IEEE Guide for Application of Electric Motors in Class I, Division 2 Hazardous (Classified) Locations

AC Electric Motors in sizes from fractional horsepower up will be considered; primary emphasis will be on the use of general purpose enclosures and precautions against excessive surface temperatures and arcing/sparking of rotor bars and enclosure joints.


IEEE Guide for In-Service Maintenance and Electrical Testing of Live-Line Tools


IEEE Guide for Maintenance, Operation, and Safety of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems (Yellow Book)

The document will cover the maintenance, operation and safety of low and medium voltage electric power systems serving industrial and commercial facilities.


IEEE Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations

This guide provides techniques for designers and facility operators to apply in determining the arc-flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which employees could be exposed during their work on or near electrical equipment.


IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations—Amendment 1

The guide provides techniques for designers and facility operators to apply in determining the arc-flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which employees could be exposed during their work on or near electrical equipment. The amendment will correct text errors in Clauses 5.2, last paragraph; Clauses 5.6, 5.7, and 7.1; and an equation error in the spreadsheet based calculator, ...


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Jobs related to Electrical Safety

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