Conferences related to X-ray Computed Tomography

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2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


2020 59th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)

The CDC is the premier conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of systems and control. The CDC annually brings together an international community of researchers and practitioners in the field of automatic control to discuss new research results, perspectives on future developments, and innovative applications relevant to decision making, automatic control, and related areas.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2020 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

All areas of ionizing radiation detection - detectors, signal processing, analysis of results, PET development, PET results, medical imaging using ionizing radiation


2020 IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM)

The scope of the 2020 IEEE/ASME AIM includes the following topics: Actuators, Automotive Systems, Bioengineering, Data Storage Systems, Electronic Packaging, Fault Diagnosis, Human-Machine Interfaces, Industry Applications, Information Technology, Intelligent Systems, Machine Vision, Manufacturing, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems, Micro/Nano Technology, Modeling and Design, System Identification and Adaptive Control, Motion Control, Vibration and Noise Control, Neural and Fuzzy Control, Opto-Electronic Systems, Optomechatronics, Prototyping, Real-Time and Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation, Robotics, Sensors, System Integration, Transportation Systems, Smart Materials and Structures, Energy Harvesting and other frontier fields.


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Periodicals related to X-ray Computed Tomography

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A) bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. From specific algorithms to full system implementations, CG&A offers a strong combination of peer-reviewed feature articles and refereed departments, including news and product announcements. Special Applications sidebars relate research stories to commercial development. Cover stories focus on creative applications of the technology by an artist or ...


Computers, IEEE Transactions on

Design and analysis of algorithms, computer systems, and digital networks; methods for specifying, measuring, and modeling the performance of computers and computer systems; design of computer components, such as arithmetic units, data storage devices, and interface devices; design of reliable and testable digital devices and systems; computer networks and distributed computer systems; new computer organizations and architectures; applications of VLSI ...


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Most published Xplore authors for X-ray Computed Tomography

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Xplore Articles related to X-ray Computed Tomography

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Reconstruction technique of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using sheet beam

2014 22nd European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), 2014

We clarify the measurement process of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using sheet-beam as incident beam, and show that the process leads to the attenuated Radon transform. In order to improve quantitativeness, we apply Natterer's scheme to the FXCT reconstruction. We show its efficacy by computer simulation.


Iterative Reconstruction for X-Ray Computed Tomography Using Prior-Image Induced Nonlocal Regularization

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 2014

Repeated X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans are often required in several specific applications such as perfusion imaging, image-guided biopsy needle, image-guided intervention, and radiotherapy with noticeable benefits. However, the associated cumulative radiation dose significantly increases as comparison with that used in the conventional CT scan, which has raised major concerns in patients. In this study, to realize radiation dose reduction ...


High energy X-ray computed tomography for industrial applications

Conference Record of the 1991 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, 1991

A high-energy X-ray computed tomography system with an electron linear accelerator was developed to image cross-sections of large-scale and high- density materials. An electron linear accelerator is used for the X-ray source. The maximum X-ray energy is 12 MeV and the average energy is around 4 MeV. The intensity of an X-ray fan beam passing through the test object is ...


X-ray computed tomography for nano packaging - a progressive NDE method

2010 12th Electronics Packaging Technology Conference, 2010

The challenge of nano-packaging requires new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize very small defects like transportation phenomenon, Kirkendall voids or micro cracks. Imaging technologies with resolutions in the sub-micron range are the desire. High end semiconductor industries today deal with functional structures down to 32 nm and below. ITRS roadmap predicts an ongoing decrease of the "DRAM ...


A high energy X-ray computed tomography using silicon semiconductor detectors

1996 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium. Conference Record, 1996

Second- and third-generation high energy industrial X-ray computed tomography systems using silicon semiconductor detectors were developed. Both systems consist of a high energy X-ray source using an electron linear accelerator with the maximum energy of 6 MeV and an array detector unit using silicon semiconductor detectors. This unit also includes a collimator with slits 0.2 mm wide and 1.4 mm ...


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Educational Resources on X-ray Computed Tomography

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Reconstruction technique of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using sheet beam

    We clarify the measurement process of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using sheet-beam as incident beam, and show that the process leads to the attenuated Radon transform. In order to improve quantitativeness, we apply Natterer's scheme to the FXCT reconstruction. We show its efficacy by computer simulation.

  • Iterative Reconstruction for X-Ray Computed Tomography Using Prior-Image Induced Nonlocal Regularization

    Repeated X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans are often required in several specific applications such as perfusion imaging, image-guided biopsy needle, image-guided intervention, and radiotherapy with noticeable benefits. However, the associated cumulative radiation dose significantly increases as comparison with that used in the conventional CT scan, which has raised major concerns in patients. In this study, to realize radiation dose reduction by reducing the X-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) in repeated CT scans, we propose a prior-image induced nonlocal (PINL) regularization for statistical iterative reconstruction via the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria, which we refer to as “PWLS-PINL”. Specifically, the PINL regularization utilizes the redundant information in the prior image and the weighted least-squares term considers a data-dependent variance estimation, aiming to improve current low- dose image quality. Subsequently, a modified iterative successive overrelaxation algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on both phantom and patient data show that the present PWLS-PINL method can achieve promising gains over the other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, low-contrast object detection, and edge detail preservation.

  • High energy X-ray computed tomography for industrial applications

    A high-energy X-ray computed tomography system with an electron linear accelerator was developed to image cross-sections of large-scale and high- density materials. An electron linear accelerator is used for the X-ray source. The maximum X-ray energy is 12 MeV and the average energy is around 4 MeV. The intensity of an X-ray fan beam passing through the test object is measured by a 15-channel detector array. CWO (CdWO/sub 4/) scintillators and photodiodes are employed for the X-ray detectors. The crosstalk noise due to scattering at X-ray photons by adjacent detectors is reduced to less than 1.6% by installing a tungsten shield between the scintillators. Extra channels are used to compensate for the baseline shift of the circuits. These techniques allowed attainment of a dynamic range of more than 85 dB and a noise level comparable to the signal amplitude of X-ray transmitted in a 420 mm-thick iron block. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was confirmed with an iron test piece 200 mm in diameter.<<ETX>>

  • X-ray computed tomography for nano packaging - a progressive NDE method

    The challenge of nano-packaging requires new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize very small defects like transportation phenomenon, Kirkendall voids or micro cracks. Imaging technologies with resolutions in the sub-micron range are the desire. High end semiconductor industries today deal with functional structures down to 32 nm and below. ITRS roadmap predicts an ongoing decrease of the "DRAM half pitch" over the next decade. Nano-packaging of course is not intended to realize pitches at the nanometer scale, but has to face the challenges of integrating such semiconductor devices with smallest pitch and high pin counts into systems. System integration (SiP, SoP, Hetero System Integration etc.) into the third dimension is the only way to reduce the gap between semiconductor level and packaging level interconnection. To control the necessary technologies a selection of suitable and effective non-destructive evaluation methods is absolutely vital. The task of these methods is not only to identify any impurities on the package surface, but also to look as deep as possible into the package volume. Available non-destructive evaluation methods (NDE) for such kind of packaging are for example X-ray microscopy, X-ray computed tomography, ultrasonic microscopy and thermal microscopy. The paper will focus on X-ray nano focus computed tomography. It will discuss the potentials and limits of X-ray NDE techniques and the sample preparation, illustrated by the investigation of a complete system in package device (SiP). More examples like cracks in solder joints, vias in PCBs and interposers, realized with voxel sizes from 10 μm down to 800 nm have already been presented by us at last year's EPTC (see &).

  • A high energy X-ray computed tomography using silicon semiconductor detectors

    Second- and third-generation high energy industrial X-ray computed tomography systems using silicon semiconductor detectors were developed. Both systems consist of a high energy X-ray source using an electron linear accelerator with the maximum energy of 6 MeV and an array detector unit using silicon semiconductor detectors. This unit also includes a collimator with slits 0.2 mm wide and 1.4 mm high, located in front of the detectors. To increase sensitivity, detector elements were placed parallel to the X-ray beams, The third-generation system had 512 detector elements arrayed with 1.3 mm pitch. To reduce detector pitch, each detector chip was mounted on a tungsten base plate using a thin film circuit board. The plate acts as shield to absorb incoming scattered X-rays and secondary electrons generated at neighbor detectors. Performance tests were carried out in the second- and third- generation systems. The spatial resolution of 0.30 mm was confirmed for an iron test piece of 70 mm diameter using the second-generation system. The scans for a slice were completed within less than 10 seconds in the third- generation system.

  • Ultrafast electron beam X-ray computed tomography for 2D and 3D two-phase flow imaging

    Imaging of complex and dynamic processes such as two- or multiphase flows with high structural as well as temporal resolution has always been a challenging task. In recent years, the electron beam X-ray computed tomography technique has been developed towards a powerful imaging tool, which reaches frame rates of 8000 fps in 2D and 1000 fps in 3D. In this paper, the latest developments as well as selected applications of ultrafast electron beam X-ray CT are presented.

  • Fluorescence X-ray computed tomography using CdTe detector array

    This research involved a 3D simulation of a non-destructive test by detecting fluorescence X-ray with a position sensitive CdTe detector. Simulations proceeded in various conditions such as different types of phantoms. All simulations were based on fluorescence X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) by using the Monte Carlo method. In general, conventional Computed Tomography (CT) analyzes materials based on attenuation coefficients and is highly dependent on the densities of the material, hence, it can be difficult to discriminate similar density materials even if their atomic numbers differ. In this research, the material was exposed to an X-ray and the characteristic X-ray was measured using a 2D CdTe planar detector array to reconstruct the 3D image. Since atoms have their own characteristic X-ray energy, our system was even able to discriminate materials of the same density if the materials are composed of different atomic numbers.

  • High energy X-ray computed tomography for industrial applications

    A high energy X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with an electron linear accelerator was developed to image cross-sections of large-scale and high- density materials. An electron linear accelerator is used as the X-ray source. The maximum X-ray energy is 12 MeV, and the average energy is around 4 MeV. The intensity of the X-ray fan beam passing through the test object is measured by a 15-channel detector array. CWO (CdWO/sub 4/) scintillators and photodiodes are used as the X-ray detectors. The crosstalk noise due to scattering of X-ray photons by adjacent detectors is reduced to less than 1.6% by installing tungsten shields between the scintillators. Extra channels are used to compensate for base line shift of the circuits. These techniques allowed attainment of a dynamic range of more than 85 dB and a noise level comparable to the signal amplitude of X-rays transmitted in a 420-mm thick iron block. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was confirmed with an iron test piece 200 mm in diameter.<<ETX>>

  • A non-destructive technique using 3D X-ray Computed Tomography to reveal semiconductor internal physical defects

    This paper focuses on the application of 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to precisely detect and confirm semiconductor internal physical defects without the need to decapsulate the sample. Equipped with advanced technologies and innovations, today's X-ray machine is capable of reconstructing the two- dimension (2D) sliced images to form 3D images and videos in much shorter time. With the introduction of 3D X-ray CT designed for electronics field, failure mechanisms once only visible after destructive analysis can now be revealed in non-destructive way. The technique not only saves cost, it shortens the turnaround time tremendously and allows customer's response and relevant improvement actions to be taken more efficiently.

  • Monte Carlo model for estimation of dose delivered to small animals during 3D high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Biological research in recent years has generated significant interest for in vivo small animal imaging technologies. 3D small animal X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides anatomical images with high spatial resolution and good bone-to-soft tissue contrast. Radiation doses to the subject can be significant when soft tissue contrast and high-resolution images are desired. We have used the MCNP Monte Carlo simulation, and calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's), in combination with high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, to calculate the depth dependent dose in 3D high resolution X-ray CT. Three spectra (30 kVp with 0.25 mm of aluminum filtration, 40 kVp with 0.50 mm Al, and 50 kVp with 1.00 mm Al) were chosen as representative of soft, medium, and hard beams. MCNP was used to simulate the dose from these X-ray spectra incident upon a cylindrical mouse- sized phantom (2.54/spl times/6.1cm). The same phantom was also constructed from solid lucite material with thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD's) placed at the positions where we sampled the dose with MCNP. The maximum and minimum dose observed in this study is 19.7 /spl plusmn/ 1.7 cGy from the soft beam measured nearest the surface, and 5.2 /spl plusmn/ 0.1 cGy from the hard beam measured furthest from the source, for a typical data acquisition with 196 angles.



Standards related to X-ray Computed Tomography

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