Nanomedicine

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Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Nanomedicine

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2020 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and North American Radio Science Meeting

The joint meeting is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state of the art research in the area of antennas and propagation, electromagnetic engineering and radio science


2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE 17th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2020)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2020 will be the 17th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2020 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross-fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2018 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2018)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2018 will be the 15th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2018 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2017)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2017 will be the 14th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2017 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2016)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forumfor the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2016 willbe the thirteenth meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitatinginteraction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2016 meeting will continue thistradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrativeapproach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2015)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2015 will be the 12th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2014)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2014 will be the eleventh meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2013 IEEE 10th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2013)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2012 IEEE 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2012)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2011 IEEE 8th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2011)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2010 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2010)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2009 IEEE 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2009)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2008 IEEE 5th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2008)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2007 IEEE 4th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2007)

  • 2006 IEEE 3rd International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2006)

  • 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2004)

  • 2002 1st IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2002)


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

All areas of ionizing radiation detection - detectors, signal processing, analysis of results, PET development, PET results, medical imaging using ionizing radiation


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Periodicals related to Nanomedicine

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Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Nanomedicine

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Xplore Articles related to Nanomedicine

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Regulating nanomedicine: new nano tools offer great promise for the future-if regulators can solve the difficulties that hold development back

IEEE Pulse, 2014

In 1979, a Hebrew University biochemist named Yechezkel Barenholz teamed with Alberto Gabizon, a newly minted Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute of Science, to find a better way to give chemotherapeutic doxorubicin to patients with cancer.


Design of a Novel PAMAM-Based Nanomedicine with Sustained NAC Release for Treatment of Neuroinflammation

2017 21st National Biomedical Engineering Meeting (BIYOMUT), 2017

PAMAM dendrimers have recently been utilized as promising biomaterials for intrinsically targeting the brain in CNS-related disorders with no effective therapies, such as cerebral palsy (CP) and ischemia. Previous studies have established their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and diffuse freely within the brain parenchyma, which are the primary challenges. In addition, PAMAM dendrimers have been shown to ...


LOMIN: Moving theranostics from bench to bedside

2011 IEEE/NIH Life Science Systems and Applications Workshop (LiSSA), 2011

The Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN) was initiated in 2009 at the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and has been led by Xiaoyuan (Shawn) Chen. Currently, LOMIN has grown to over 25 members who work together in diverse fields to develop theranostic molecular imaging tools and drug delivery systems. LOMIN is ...


Application of nanomaterials in the field of nanomedicine

2017 4th IEEE International Conference on Engineering Technologies and Applied Sciences (ICETAS), 2017

The application of nanomaterials in the field of nanomedicine has attracted the attention of researchers since 1990. Therefore, this review addresses a brief discussion about the importance of nanostructure in the field of medicine. The application of nanomedicine requires good understanding of the behavior of the materials as a function of microstructure. Significant progress has been made in various aspects ...


New Technology and Clinical Applications of Nanomedicine

2007 International Symposium on Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science, 2007

Nanomedicine is the medical diagnosis, monitoring and applying treatment at the level of single molecules or molecular assemblies that provide structure, control, signals, homeostasis, and motility in living cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-sized fluorescent probes suitable for advanced biological imaging. The nanotechnology will be very useful for the drug delivery and diagnostic approach. The development of a cancer therapy ...


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Educational Resources on Nanomedicine

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Regulating nanomedicine: new nano tools offer great promise for the future-if regulators can solve the difficulties that hold development back

    In 1979, a Hebrew University biochemist named Yechezkel Barenholz teamed with Alberto Gabizon, a newly minted Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute of Science, to find a better way to give chemotherapeutic doxorubicin to patients with cancer.

  • Design of a Novel PAMAM-Based Nanomedicine with Sustained NAC Release for Treatment of Neuroinflammation

    PAMAM dendrimers have recently been utilized as promising biomaterials for intrinsically targeting the brain in CNS-related disorders with no effective therapies, such as cerebral palsy (CP) and ischemia. Previous studies have established their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and diffuse freely within the brain parenchyma, which are the primary challenges. In addition, PAMAM dendrimers have been shown to selectively localize to activated microglia and astrocytes in regions of neuroinflammation, allowing for efficient delivery of potent therapeutics to sites of injury. In this study, a novel PAMAM-based drug delivery system for the anti-inflammatory small molecule N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) as a brain targeting nano-vehicle with a sustained and slow drug release profile is presented. This design enables NAC molecules conjugated to the periphery of PAMAM dendrimers with ester and disulfide linkers to release in a step-wise manner by responding to different enviromental conditions. Moreover, cellular internalization studies were conducted with a fluorescently labelled version of the conjugate to confirm nontoxicity and time-dependent cellular uptake by activated microglia. Sustained release of NAC molecules results in improved anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative efficacies, demonstrating that D-(NAC-NAC) is a very promising drug loaded nanoparticle for prolonged treatment of CNS-related disorders.

  • LOMIN: Moving theranostics from bench to bedside

    The Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN) was initiated in 2009 at the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and has been led by Xiaoyuan (Shawn) Chen. Currently, LOMIN has grown to over 25 members who work together in diverse fields to develop theranostic molecular imaging tools and drug delivery systems. LOMIN is an interdisciplinary group divided into different sections based on expertise, but not divided by research projects. The three interdisciplinary and versatile groups, the PET/Optical Imaging Probe Section, the Biological Molecular Imaging Section and the Theranostic Nanomedicine Section, consist of chemists, engineers, biologists, and clinicians working together to transfer biomedical technology from the bench to the bedside. LOMIN works cohesively on its main mission to improve molecular imaging strategies for better understanding of biology, early diagnosis of disease, monitoring therapies and guiding drug discovery and development. In addition, special emphasis is placed on developing high sensitivity nanosensors for biomarker detection and theranostic nanomedicine for imaging, gene and drug delivery and therapy monitoring. LOMIN has developed novel imaging agents for targeting of various biological processes and monitoring therapies that have been slated for clinical trials. The future of LOMIN is to expand collaborations in order to apply lead imaging and therapeutic agents to the clinic. In this presentation, LOMIN will be introduced with our representative up-to-date research projects.

  • Application of nanomaterials in the field of nanomedicine

    The application of nanomaterials in the field of nanomedicine has attracted the attention of researchers since 1990. Therefore, this review addresses a brief discussion about the importance of nanostructure in the field of medicine. The application of nanomedicine requires good understanding of the behavior of the materials as a function of microstructure. Significant progress has been made in various aspects of synthesis of nano-scale materials for medicine field. Biosensor of 10 nanomaters was made using boron-doped silicon by Charles Lieber of Harvard University. The presence of biomolecule on the nanowires altered the properties such as conductivity, this could help to detect any biomolecules adhered on the nanosurface. Nanostructure of precious metals of gold and silver atoms could be applied in the treatment of some diseases. The gold atoms have an effect on cancer cells, especially, after operation. It was found that gold atoms can detect and kill cells of cancer, which have been left after tumor removal operation. The layered nanomaterials will be tested as a candidate for drug delivery and trapper for harmful anions. The future of nanomedicine is promising by working towards every known human disease, also the protection of the human body against all forms of infections.

  • New Technology and Clinical Applications of Nanomedicine

    Nanomedicine is the medical diagnosis, monitoring and applying treatment at the level of single molecules or molecular assemblies that provide structure, control, signals, homeostasis, and motility in living cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-sized fluorescent probes suitable for advanced biological imaging. The nanotechnology will be very useful for the drug delivery and diagnostic approach. The development of a cancer therapy monitoring/diagnostic platform device such a device is intended to provide near real time monitoring of patient blood for cancer cells, cell derived nanoparticulates, such as high molecular weight DNA fragments.

  • Wireless powering electronics and spiral coils for implant microsystem toward nanomedicine diagnosis and therapy in free-behavior animal

    In this paper, we present a wireless RF-powering electronics approach in an implantable biomedical microsystem with versatile sensors/actuators toward nanomedicine diagnosis and therapy applications. Miniaturized spiral coils as a wireless power module with low-dropout (LDO) linear regulator circuit convert RF signal into DC voltage provide a batteryless implantation for truly free-behavior monitoring. Presented design achieves low quiescent-current and line/load regulation, high antenna/current efficiency with thermal protection to avoid damage to the implanted tissue. Related characterization demonstrates the proposed design to be applied to the desired nanomedicine microsystem.

  • Chimeric ferritin nanocages-based imaging probes

    Summary form only given. Ferritin is a family of proteins found in different forms in most living organisms. Each ferritin is made up of 24 subunits, which self-assemble to form a cage-like nanostructure, with external and internal diameters of 12 and 8 nm, respectively. This unique architecture provides two interfaces-one outside and one inside-for possible functional loading. These interesting features make ferritin a powerful, capacious nanoplatform with potential in a wide spectrum of applications. In the current study, we evaluated ferritin nanocages as candidate nanoplatforms for multifunctional loading. Ferritin nanocages can be either genetically or chemically modified to impart functionalities to their surfaces, and metal cations can be encapsulated in their interiors by association with metal binding sites. Moreover, different types of ferritin nanocages can be disassembled and reassembled to achieve function hybridization. We were able to use combinations of these unique properties to produce a number of multifunctional ferritin nano structures with precise control of their composition. We then studied these nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, to evaluate their potential suitability as multimodality imaging probes. The results demonstrate promise of ferritin nano structures as prospective nanoplatforms for the era of nanomedicine. In a separate study, we harnessed the disassembly/reassembly nature as the driving force to pack an energy pair into a ferritin nanostructure to arrive at activatable probes. The technique of activatable probes allows the signals to be only amplified at diseased areas upon a designated environment change, a feature which can greatly improve the signal- to-background ratio. Specifically, we coupled Cy5.5-tagged peptide and BHQ-3 (BHQ=black hole quencher), a widely utilized quencher of Cy5.5, onto ferritins to create two sets of protein cages. The core peptide sequence, Pro-Leu-Gly- Val-Arg (PLGVR), has proven selectivity for multiple types of MMPs. We then mixed and broke down both types of proteins to subunits at pH 2 and subsequently tuned the pH back to neutral, which restored the protein nanostructure in a hybrid fashion. The conglomeration of both dyes and quenchers on the protein surface induced a quenched state to the overall nanostructure. Subsequently, when the probes were exposed to an MMP-rich environment, such as in a tumor, the PLGVR substrate would be cut off, thus leading to the release of Cy5.5 and the restoration of fluorescence activity. We then confirmed the feasibility of such probes on a xenograft mouse model. Such a platform can be readily applied to prepare other kinds of probes with different protease sensitivities.

  • Revolutionizing the healthcare of the future through nanomedicine: Opportunities and challenges

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, production and application of structures, devices or systems at the incredibly small scale of atoms and molecules-the "nanoscale". As a result, this technology has the potential to remarkably affect the development of the healthcare sector by revolutionizing both the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of diseases. In this paper, current advances in modern medicine are presented and discussed. Drug delivery, gene delivery, immune system support and health monitoring are demonstrated as few examples of the many applications that uses nanotechnology in disease diagnosis. In addition, the technology of bionanosensors is presented to highlight their ability to sense the biochemical and biophysical signals associated with diseases at the molecular or cellular levels. Further, nanoparticles are demonstrated as essential building blocks of nanotechnology in which various types of materials are presented and characterized. Finally, the challenges and future trends associated with this developing technology are illustrated.

  • An Acoustic Communication Technique of Nanorobot Swarms for Nanomedicine Applications

    In this contribution, we present a communication paradigm among nanodevices, based on acoustic vibrations for medical applications. We consider a swarm of nanorobots able to communicate in a distributed and decentralized fashion, propelled in a biological environment (i.e., the human brain). Each nanorobot is intended to i) recognize a cancer cell, ii) destroy it, and then iii) forward information about the presence of cancer formation to other nanorobots, through acoustic signals. The choice of acoustic waves as communication mean is related to the application context, where it is not advisable either to use indiscriminate chemical substances or electromagnetic waves. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is assessed in terms of achievement of the objective (i.e., to destroy the majority of tumor cells), and the velocity of detection and destruction of cancer cells, through a comparison with other related techniques.

  • Nanoscale platform for control, interrogation and optimization of molecular sensing interfaces, toward application to nanomedicine

    Sensitive transduction of bio-molecular binding events on chip carries profound implications to the outcome of a range of in vitro sensors. This includes biosensors that address research as well as diagnostic questions of clinical relevance, e.g., profiling of biomarkers, protein expression, drug and toxicity screening, drug-efficacy monitoring, among others. Nanostructured biosensors in general, and plasmonic biosensors in specific constitute a promising advance in this direction owing to their ability to cater to better sensitivity, response times, and miniaturization, in addition to imparting smart, intelligent capabilities to interfaces. Plasmonic biosensors take advantage of electromagnetic (EM) near-field enhancements at nanoscale geometries such as curvatures or gaps of the order of only a few nanometers, in order to transduce molecular binding events with high sensitivity. The geometric length scales involved, typically overlap with the size of small proteins. For a successful outcome and rational design of plasmonic sensors, it is crucial to attain a control over fabrication down to molecular resolutions. Such control should enable an orthogonal access to the different geometric attributes (e.g., size, separation, curvatures, topography) and uniformly so, across macroscopic areas (of at least a few square millimeters). This is necessary to ensure that the influence of the geometric variables on the optical or biomolecular response is adequately mapped. The uniformity across macroscopic lengthscales will enable correlating the macroscopic response with what happens at the nanoscale, and further enabling the use of analytical tools with macroscopic foot prints (e.g., XPS, IR, SPR). In this direction, the talk would present approaches to fabrication of gold nanoarrays of different types, their optical and spectroscopic investigations correlated with their geometries in application to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based molecular sensing. The fabrication schemes exploit combination of molecular and colloidal self-assembly, delivering nanoarrays with feature separations down to sub-10nm regime, systematic and orthogonal control over different geometric variables, exhibiting low standard deviations (<; 10%) across full-wafer level. These approaches enable a promising nanoscale platform to efficient investigations and rational optimization of plasmonic biointerfaces.



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