Conferences related to Therapeutic Ultrasound

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2020 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC)

The Conference focuses on all aspects of instrumentation and measurement science andtechnology research development and applications. The list of program topics includes but isnot limited to: Measurement Science & Education, Measurement Systems, Measurement DataAcquisition, Measurements of Physical Quantities, and Measurement Applications.


2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.


2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

The conference covers all aspects of the technology associated with ultrasound generation and detection and their applications.


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,


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Periodicals related to Therapeutic Ultrasound

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Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Both general and technical articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering; societal implications of medical technologies; current news items; book reviews; patent descriptions; and correspondence. Special interest departments, students, law, clinical engineering, ethics, new products, society news, historical features and government.


Instrumentation and Measurement, IEEE Transactions on

Measurements and instrumentation utilizing electrical and electronic techniques.


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Most published Xplore authors for Therapeutic Ultrasound

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Xplore Articles related to Therapeutic Ultrasound

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Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) for MR-guided noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound applications

TRANSDUCERS 2009 - 2009 International Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Conference, 2009

In the last decade, noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased in popularity for diseases such as cancer and heart arrhythmias. While piezoelectric transducers are the dominant technology for therapeutic ultrasound applications, recently capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have demonstrated competitive performance and ease of fabrication. In this paper, we present a CMUT design for MR-guided ...


Pilot clinical studies of long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound for osteoarthritis

2014 40th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference (NEBEC), 2014

Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of disability in the aging population. Long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound has had promising impact in animal models to slow the progression of the disease and provide joint relief. Two pilot studies were conducted using a novel, wearable platform for delivering ultrasound to evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ultrasound therapy on ...


Evaluation of the therapeutic ultrasound immersion technique applied in phantom

2014 Pan American Health Care Exchanges (PAHCE), 2014

The present work evaluate the heating pattern of therapeutic ultrasound using immersion technique in a phantom of fat tissue made of silicone in different distances. Five tests were performed in each of six positions: 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 cm apart from the transducer surface, at 1 MHz, continuous mode and effective intensity 1.05 W·cm-2 for 180s. In ...


Comparison of acoustic power calibration methods for therapeutic ultrasound transducers using PVDF membrane hydrophone, heterodyne laser vibrometery and radiation force measurements

2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, 2009

The acoustic pressure field and power radiated from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer are of great importance for the safety of the patients in clinical applications. We compared three acoustic power calibration methods for the HIFU transducer. These include a PVDF membrane hydrophone, ¿brush¿ target radiation force balance, and heterodyne laser vibrometer. The acoustic pressure and power amplitude ...


Stress Estimation in Different Bone Layers Subject to Therapeutic Ultrasound in an Intelligent Bone System

IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, 2015

Physiological effects caused by power ultrasound radiation are of therapeutic benefits for fracture healing. However, these effects are hard to detect with current instrumentations. The aim of this paper is to analyze the behavior of bone subject to therapeutic ultrasound and provide data reference for an intelligent bone ultrasonic system. In this paper, we adopted a 3-D finite element method ...


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Educational Resources on Therapeutic Ultrasound

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) for MR-guided noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound applications

    In the last decade, noninvasive therapeutic ultrasound guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased in popularity for diseases such as cancer and heart arrhythmias. While piezoelectric transducers are the dominant technology for therapeutic ultrasound applications, recently capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have demonstrated competitive performance and ease of fabrication. In this paper, we present a CMUT design for MR-guided therapeutic ultrasound, with circular cells and center mass (piston) that fulfills the requirements for therapy of upper abdominal cancers, i.e. 1 MPa peak to peak output pressure at 2.5 MHz. In particular, we discuss the choice of cell shape and membrane topography and their influences on output pressure of the device.

  • Pilot clinical studies of long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound for osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of disability in the aging population. Long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound has had promising impact in animal models to slow the progression of the disease and provide joint relief. Two pilot studies were conducted using a novel, wearable platform for delivering ultrasound to evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ultrasound therapy on knee osteoarthritis. There was a pain reduction effect from using ultrasound, as high as fifty two percent in one study. As well, initial data demonstrates that mobility may be increased for patients experiencing mild to moderate arthritis of the knee.

  • Evaluation of the therapeutic ultrasound immersion technique applied in phantom

    The present work evaluate the heating pattern of therapeutic ultrasound using immersion technique in a phantom of fat tissue made of silicone in different distances. Five tests were performed in each of six positions: 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 cm apart from the transducer surface, at 1 MHz, continuous mode and effective intensity 1.05 W·cm-2 for 180s. In the most superficial thermocouple, there was decrease in the temperature from the distance 0 cm to 1 cm and the following distances (2, 3, 5 and 10 cm) also experienced reduction above 90% of the average value at 0 cm. In thermocouples 2, 3 and 4 there was no significant difference with increasing distance from the transducer to the phantom.

  • Comparison of acoustic power calibration methods for therapeutic ultrasound transducers using PVDF membrane hydrophone, heterodyne laser vibrometery and radiation force measurements

    The acoustic pressure field and power radiated from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer are of great importance for the safety of the patients in clinical applications. We compared three acoustic power calibration methods for the HIFU transducer. These include a PVDF membrane hydrophone, ¿brush¿ target radiation force balance, and heterodyne laser vibrometer. The acoustic pressure and power amplitude measurements had good agreement within a margin of 5% in the measurable acoustic power range. The advantages and limitations of each of the calibration methods were studied.

  • Stress Estimation in Different Bone Layers Subject to Therapeutic Ultrasound in an Intelligent Bone System

    Physiological effects caused by power ultrasound radiation are of therapeutic benefits for fracture healing. However, these effects are hard to detect with current instrumentations. The aim of this paper is to analyze the behavior of bone subject to therapeutic ultrasound and provide data reference for an intelligent bone ultrasonic system. In this paper, we adopted a 3-D finite element method as a virtual measurement tool to study the acoustic-radiation- induced stress fields inside and on the surface of bone. The equivalent long bone model was built and the soft tissue was involved by establishing coupling connections with bone surface points. The ultrasound radiation was generated by a 2-MHz excitation and was applied on the surface of soft tissue. In this paper, we first defined six paths in different bone layers to quantitatively study the longitudinal stress distribution and examined the concentration center positions and width with sliding windows. Then, the circumferential stress evolution from relaxation fields to concentration fields was investigated by computing the stress fields on cross sections. Analytical dispersion curves were measured to characterize the guided wave modes. The results show that the middle bone tissue has a higher mean stress (2027.7 Pa) than the surface (763.3 Pa) and the outer bone layer (1898.1 Pa), and the stress distribution of the middle layer is less disturbed (coefficient of variation = 39.8 %). Also, on cross section of the concentration zones, periodical fields with a distance of half-wavelength are obtained. From 0.2 to 2 MHz, the acoustic intensity grows proportionally with excitation amplitude.

  • Characterization of hydrophone with hydrothermal PZT thick film vibrator and Ti front layer for measurement in high intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) field is important for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissue. In this paper, the robust designed needle type hydrophones were fabricated by the titanium front plate to withstand cavitation and by the deposition of a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thick film vibrator on the opposite surface of titanium plate. Direct measurements of acoustic distribution profile at a focal region of the HITU probe driven continuous wave (CW) with input power to the sound source up to 50 W were performed. The tough hydrophone sensitivity responding to CW driven power range up to 50 W was measured in a tank of degassed water. The sensitivity was responding linearly up to about 8 MPa and not responding linearly acoustic pressure higher than 8 MPa, while the velocity of the vibration at the HITU probe was responding linearly up to driven power of 50 W. This 8 MPa was estimated in comparison with the standard hydrophone at driven power of 1 W to the sound source. We confirmed the linearity of responsivity of our hydrophone at high acoustic pressure. However, sensitivity of this hydrophone should be calibrated with higher acoustic pressure for higher acoustic power measurements. It is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HITU fields.

  • Therapeutic ultrasound system transducer coupling fluid management system

    Water continues to be the most commonly used fluid when coupling the energy emanating from a therapeutic ultrasound transducer to its target tissue. In many therapeutic ultrasound systems, this coupling fluid performs additional functions, such as transducer cooling, target tissue temperature management, and transducer/target tissue separation management, and is typically degassed to prevent the formation and accumulation of cavitation bubbles in the transducer's propagation path. Readying a therapeutic ultrasound system for use normally involves preparing this coupling mechanism, and being able to do this quickly and easily by the clinician or clinical support staff has tremendous implications on procedure workflow and time, as well as on overall system ease of use.

  • Acoustic and thermal outputs of commercially available therapeutic ultrasound devices

    Therapeutic ultrasound, which uses mechanical waves to apply therapy to tissue, is a growing field with applications for physical therapy and improved recovery. This study investigates the acoustic and thermal output characteristics of four therapeutic ultrasound systems, with an aim toward appreciating performance similarities and differences, which is essential to rational experimental design, both on the bench and in the clinic. Acoustic output varied from 0.17 W to 1.14 W, and temperature change mediated in ex vivo muscle tissue ranged from 0.5°C to 3.4°C at a depth of 2 cm. These notable differences reinforce the importance of not considering all therapeutic ultrasound devices equal.

  • Can therapeutic ultrasound be used as a reversible male contraceptive?

    Background, Motivation and Objective: Studies on the utility of ultrasound as a reversible male contraceptive were initially reported in the 1970s by Fahim and his colleagues. Their studies with rat and human subjects showed that a single dose of ultrasound could dramatically decrease sperm count and induced infertility for up to six months. Depending upon the dose of ultrasound, this contraceptive effect was reversible. Our objective was to determine if modern therapeutic ultrasound instruments could form the basis for a male contraceptive, and to elucidate acoustic mechanism of observed infertility. Statement of Contribution/Methods: In order to determine effect of ultrasound on reproductive capacity in-vivo, rat testes were subjected to 2.2 W/cm<sup>2</sup> ultrasound at either 1 or 3 MHz using a therapeutic ultrasound generator and transducer. Testis histology and sperm counts were examined two weeks after treatment. To elucidate mechanism of ultrasound effects on reproductive cells, sperm from rat epididymis were sonicated in- vitro in a dual optical-acoustic-focus setup with 1 MHz pulses with lengths ranging from 1,000 to 10,000 cycles. Pulses had peak negative pressures between ~1 and 10 MPa and were delivered at a 1 Hz PRF for between 30 and 90 s. Results: Sham-treated rats produced sperm counts between 200 to 300 million sperm per cauda epididymis, while ultrasound treatment reduced sperm counts to ~2 million sperm per cauda epididymis two weeks after treatment. Sperm recovered from ultrasound-treated rats had reduced motility. The corpus and caput epididymis of treated animals had significantly lower numbers of sperm than sham-treated animals. In addition, portions of the epididymis had decreased tubular diameters, similar to that seen in castrated animals. The height of the seminiferous epithelium in ultrasound-treated rats decreased significantly compared to sham-treated animals, due to a significant loss of testicular germ cells. Individual sperm exposed to ultrasound ex-vivo were observed to be extremely resistant to acoustic energy. In-vitro sonication of sperm up to ~10 Megapascals at 1 MHz did not permanently alter their motility after pulses were delivered. However, if microbubbles were present in the solution, cavitation caused permanent and terminal disruption of the cells within the field of view. Discussion and Conclusions: Our studies using modern therapeutic ultrasound instrumentation demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasound as a form of male contraception. However, in-vitro studies have not yet elucidated the mechanism of cell disruption. Further studies determining the kinetics of germ cell loss, direct effects on sperm, the duration of the contraceptive effect, and any long-term effects to the seminiferous, interstitial or epididymal epithelia are needed to establish the efficacy and reversibility of any ultrasound-based contraceptive.

  • Enhancing fluorescein release from in-situ forming PLGA implants using therapeutic ultrasound

    Systemic chemotherapy has been associated with poor tumor penetration and adverse cytotoxic effects. To combat this, cancer therapy with in-situ forming implants (ISFIs) can provide continuous, high dose release of chemotherapeutic drug directly at the tumor site. However, poor drug distribution through the tumor volume has limited the effectiveness and subsequent translation of ISFIs into clinical practice. Our lab has previously demonstrated an increase in drug release and penetration from injectable, phase inverting PLGA implants in an in-vitro phantom model using low frequency ultrasound. To build on this work, in-vivo fluorescein intensity and distribution was evaluated in subcutaneous ISFIs with and without therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) exposure.



Standards related to Therapeutic Ultrasound

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No standards are currently tagged "Therapeutic Ultrasound"


Jobs related to Therapeutic Ultrasound

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