Conferences related to Speech Privacy

Back to Top

2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


2020 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2021 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2019 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2018 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2017 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for the presentation of developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.Papers offer novel research contributions in any aspect of computer security or electronic privacy. Papers may represent advances in the theory, design, implementation, analysis, or empirical evaluation of secure systems, either for general use or for specific application domains.

  • 2016 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for the presentation of developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.Papers offer novel research contributions in any aspect of computer security or electronic privacy. Papers may represent advances in the theory, design, implementation, analysis, or empirical evaluation of secure systems, either for general use or for specific application domains.

  • 2015 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for the presentation of developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.Papers offer novel research contributions in any aspect of computer security or electronic privacy. Papers may represent advances in the theory, design, implementation, analysis, or empirical evaluation of secure systems, either for general use or for specific application domains.

  • 2014 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for computer security research, presenting the latest developments and bringing together researchers and practitioners.

  • 2013 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP) Conference dates subject to change

    IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for computer security research, presenting the latest developments and bringing together researchers and practitioners.

  • 2012 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP) Conference dates subject to change

    IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for computer security research, presenting the latest developments and bringing together researchers and practitioners.

  • 2011 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2010 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    S&P is interested in all aspects of computer security and privacy.

  • 2009 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    The IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2008 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Since 1980, the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy has been the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field.

  • 2007 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

    Research contributions in any aspect of computer security and electronic privacy including advances in the theory, design, implementation, analysis of empirical evaluation of secure systems.

  • 2006 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP)

  • 2005 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SRSP)


GLOBECOM 2020 - 2020 IEEE Global Communications Conference

IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM) is one of the IEEE Communications Society’s two flagship conferences dedicated to driving innovation in nearly every aspect of communications. Each year, more than 2,900 scientific researchers and their management submit proposals for program sessions to be held at the annual conference. After extensive peer review, the best of the proposals are selected for the conference program, which includes technical papers, tutorials, workshops and industry sessions designed specifically to advance technologies, systems and infrastructure that are continuing to reshape the world and provide all users with access to an unprecedented spectrum of high-speed, seamless and cost-effective global telecommunications services.


ICASSP 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Speech Privacy

Back to Top

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Audio, Speech, and Language Processing, IEEE Transactions on

Speech analysis, synthesis, coding speech recognition, speaker recognition, language modeling, speech production and perception, speech enhancement. In audio, transducers, room acoustics, active sound control, human audition, analysis/synthesis/coding of music, and consumer audio. (8) (IEEE Guide for Authors) The scope for the proposed transactions includes SPEECH PROCESSING - Transmission and storage of Speech signals; speech coding; speech enhancement and noise reduction; ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Communications Magazine, IEEE

IEEE Communications Magazine was the number three most-cited journal in telecommunications and the number eighteen cited journal in electrical and electronics engineering in 2004, according to the annual Journal Citation Report (2004 edition) published by the Institute for Scientific Information. Read more at http://www.ieee.org/products/citations.html. This magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications ...


Communications, IEEE Transactions on

Telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation, including radio; wire; aerial, underground, coaxial, and submarine cables; waveguides, communication satellites, and lasers; in marine, aeronautical, space and fixed station services; repeaters, radio relaying, signal storage, and regeneration; telecommunication error detection and correction; multiplexing and carrier techniques; communication switching systems; data communications; and communication theory. In addition to the above, ...


More Periodicals

Most published Xplore authors for Speech Privacy

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Speech Privacy

Back to Top

Sound masking for achieving speech privacy with parametric acoustic array speaker

2014 Joint 7th International Conference on Soft Computing and Intelligent Systems (SCIS) and 15th International Symposium on Advanced Intelligent Systems (ISIS), 2014

Speech privacy in open spaces is becoming increasingly important in various situations. Although measures such as the use of sound partitions are already used in many cases, measures that mask speech by emitting sounds have also been considered. A method of masking meaningful speech with meaningless noise would be valuable. Because of this, previous studies have investigated the ability of ...


Towards Gender-Dependent Babble Maskers for Speech Privacy Protection

2013 Ninth International Conference on Intelligent Information Hiding and Multimedia Signal Processing, 2013

In this paper, we investigated on an efficient masker for speech privacy protection. Previously, we proposed and evaluated a speaker-dependent masker which is created from speech of the speaker being masked. This masker was proven to lower the intelligibility of speech at a much lower level than conventional babble maskers. However, this masker needs to be prepared for each potential ...


Improving speech privacy in personal sound zones

2016 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 2016

This paper proposes two methods for providing speech privacy between spatial zones in anechoic and reverberant environments. The methods are based on masking the content leaked between regions. The masking is optimised to maximise the speech intelligibility contrast (SIC) between the zones. The first method uses a uniform masker signal that is combined with desired multizone loudspeaker signals and requires ...


Active Speech Obscuration with Speaker-dependent Human Speech-like Noise for Speech Privacy

2018 Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association Annual Summit and Conference (APSIPA ASC), 2018

This paper introduces a new active speech obscuration with speaker-dependent human speech-like noise (HSLN) for speech privacy. Recently, speech privacy is regarded as an important issue in open public spaces such as hospitals, pharmacies, banks, and so on. To protect speech privacy, speech obscuration methods utilizing HSLN have been studied. HSLNs are designed by superposing various speech signals and speech ...


Auditory masking control system for protecting speech privacy by playing back filtered BGM sounds with flat-panel loudspeakers

The SICE Annual Conference 2013, 2013

Conversation sounds spoken over prescription pharmacy counters between pharmacists and customers may include privacy information of the customers. This vocal privacy information can be easily leaked to the other customers waiting in the same pharmacy store. In order to protect the above speech privacy information, a method of generating white noises in a target room on purpose has been proposed. ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Speech Privacy

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Sound masking for achieving speech privacy with parametric acoustic array speaker

    Speech privacy in open spaces is becoming increasingly important in various situations. Although measures such as the use of sound partitions are already used in many cases, measures that mask speech by emitting sounds have also been considered. A method of masking meaningful speech with meaningless noise would be valuable. Because of this, previous studies have investigated the ability of meaningless steady noise to mask speech and consequently achieve speech privacy. However, the research to date has focused on evaluating speech privacy when the masking noise is emitted from the normal loud speaker system all over the room. The masking noise emitted to the area where high level of speech privacy is not required, may cause an increased psychological impression of annoyance, leading to a decline in performance. In this study, we used a highly directional sound from modulated ultrasound as a masking noise for achieving speech privacy in the narrow area. Psychological experiments were conducted in which the masking sound was transmitted to participants from frontal directions with a parametric acoustic array speaker. Using the experimental data, the relationships between the degree of speech privacy and frequency characteristics that directivity of parametric acoustic array speaker were investigated. The results suggested that it is possible to maintain speech privacy in the narrow area by presenting highly directional masking sound.

  • Towards Gender-Dependent Babble Maskers for Speech Privacy Protection

    In this paper, we investigated on an efficient masker for speech privacy protection. Previously, we proposed and evaluated a speaker-dependent masker which is created from speech of the speaker being masked. This masker was proven to lower the intelligibility of speech at a much lower level than conventional babble maskers. However, this masker needs to be prepared for each potential speaker, and may be expensive to create and maintain. Accordingly, we investigated on an alternative masker, where the speech is masked by a masker created from a different speaker of the same gender. We measured the effectiveness of this gender-dependent masker, and found that male gender-dependent masker is feasible, with efficiency almost equal to the previously proposed speaker-dependent masker. However, female speech was not as effectively masked, and needs further investigation.

  • Improving speech privacy in personal sound zones

    This paper proposes two methods for providing speech privacy between spatial zones in anechoic and reverberant environments. The methods are based on masking the content leaked between regions. The masking is optimised to maximise the speech intelligibility contrast (SIC) between the zones. The first method uses a uniform masker signal that is combined with desired multizone loudspeaker signals and requires acoustic contrast between zones. The second method computes a space-time domain masker signal in parallel with the loudspeaker signals so that the combination of the two emphasises the spectral masking in the targeted quiet zone. Simulations show that it is possible to achieve a significant SIC in anechoic environments whilst maintaining speech quality in the bright zone.

  • Active Speech Obscuration with Speaker-dependent Human Speech-like Noise for Speech Privacy

    This paper introduces a new active speech obscuration with speaker-dependent human speech-like noise (HSLN) for speech privacy. Recently, speech privacy is regarded as an important issue in open public spaces such as hospitals, pharmacies, banks, and so on. To protect speech privacy, speech obscuration methods utilizing HSLN have been studied. HSLNs are designed by superposing various speech signals and speech obscuration is achieved by hearing the target speech and HSLN at the same time. Conventionally, HSLN is designed with the pitch of the target speech as the sole speaker-dependent characteristic. However, additional speaker-dependent characteristics are required because the performance of speech obscuration is still insufficient. Therefore, we propose a speaker-dependent HSLN design method for effective speech obscuration that uses the third formant frequency of the target speech in addition to pitch as speaker-dependent characteristics. The third formant frequency is related to voice quality, which depends on the shape and length of the vocal tract. It follows that the proposed method can effectively mask the target speech by the HSLN considering the pitch and third formant frequency, which are analyzed from the speech. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  • Auditory masking control system for protecting speech privacy by playing back filtered BGM sounds with flat-panel loudspeakers

    Conversation sounds spoken over prescription pharmacy counters between pharmacists and customers may include privacy information of the customers. This vocal privacy information can be easily leaked to the other customers waiting in the same pharmacy store. In order to protect the above speech privacy information, a method of generating white noises in a target room on purpose has been proposed. However, this method will give us uncomfortable environments and has been not widely used, especially in Japanese pharmacy stores. We propose a novel BGM system giving protecting functions for speech privacy information, by proposing a filtering method for generally used music or natural sound signals, in order to emphasize their auditory masking functions against speech sounds as strong as white noises. We have made three kinds of both objective and subjective evaluations for our proposed filtering processes. As one of the subjective evaluations, we installed our developed flat-panel loudspeaker in a waiting room of a large-scale prescription pharmacy store, and have tried our proposal there. As a result, we could not recognize any quality distortion in masker sounds played back, whereas we could find difficulty to listen to conversation sounds between couples of a pharmacist and a customer at the waiting area, as far as heard masker sounds had proper level.

  • Speech privacy for modern mobile communication systems

    Speech privacy techniques are used to scramble clear speech into an unintelligible signal in order to avoid eavesdropping. Some analog speech- privacy equipments (scramblers) have been replaced by digital encryption devices (comsec), which have higher degree of security but require complex implementations and large bandwidth for transmission. However, if speech privacy is wanted in a mobile phone using a modern commercial codec, such as the AMR (adaptive multirate) codec, digital encryption may not be an option due to the fact that it requires internal hardware and software modifications. If encryption is applied before the codec, poor voice quality may result, for the vocoder would handle digitally encrypted signal resembling noise. On the other hand, analog scramblers may be placed before the voice encoder without causing much penalty to its performance. Analog scramblers are intended in applications where the degree of security is not too critical and hardware modifications are prohibitive due to its high cost. In this article we investigate the use of different techniques of voice scramblers applied to mobile communications vocoders. We present our results in terms of LPC and cepstral distances, and PESQ values.

  • Study on method for protecting speech privacy by actively controlling speech transmission index in simulated room

    Protecting speech privacy in a specific room is an important challenge in room acoustics. However, protecting people's conversation from being overheard by an unintended listener, that is, making them not understandable, is difficult. This paper proposes a method for protecting speech privacy by actively controlling the speech transmission index (STI) in a simulated room containing an unintended listener. In this method, the STI in the simulated room can be controlled by manipulating the parameters of the simulated room impulse response (RIR). We can control the STI by convolving speech with the simulated RIR because the presentation of speech and additive delayed-manipulated speech can be regarded as the convolution of speech with late reverberation in the simulated room. Three experiments (world intelligibility, listening difficulty, and annoyance tests) were conducted to compare the proposed method with two conventional methods (noise masking and reverberation). The results showed that speech privacy can be protected by controlling STI derived by manipulating the simulated RIR. The results also showed that the proposed method can protect the privacy of conversations as effectively as those other methods can by using lower noise levels and shorter reverberation.

  • Speechless: Analyzing the Threat to Speech Privacy from Smartphone Motion Sensors

    According to recent research, motion sensors available on current smartphone platforms may be sensitive to speech signals. From a security and privacy perspective, this raises a serious concern regarding sensitive speech reconstruction, and speaker or gender identification by a malicious application having unrestricted access to motion sensor readings, without using the microphone. In this paper, we revisit this important line of research and closely inspect the effect of speech on smartphone motion sensors, in particular, gyroscope and accelerometer. First, we revisit the previously studied scenario (Michalevsky et al.; USENIX Security 2014), where the smartphone shares a common surface with a loudspeaker (with subwoofer) generating speech signals. We observe some effect on the motion sensor signals, which may indeed allow speaker and gender recognition to an extent. However, we also argue that the recorded effect on the sensor readings is possibly from conductive vibrations through the shared surface instead of direct acoustic vibrations due to speech as perceived in previous work. Second, we further extend the previous work by analyzing the effect of speech produced by (1) other less powerful speakers like the in-built laptop and smartphone speakers, and (2) live humans. Our experiments show that in-built laptop speakers were only able to affect the accelerometer when the laptop and the motion sensor shared a surface. Smartphone speakers were not found to be powerful enough to invoke a response in the motion sensors through aerial vibrations. We also report that in the presence of live human speech, we did not notice any effect on the motion sensor readings. Our results have two-fold implications. First, human-rendered speech seems potentially incapacitated to trigger smartphone motion sensors within the limited sampling rates imposed by the smartphone operating systems. Second, it seems that even machine-rendered speech may not be powerful enough to affect smartphone motion sensors through the aerial medium, although it may induce vibrations through a conductive surface that these sensors, especially accelerometer, could pick up if a relatively powerful speaker is used. Overall, our results suggest that smartphone motion sensors may pose a threat to speech privacy only in some limited scenarios.

  • Gender-Dependent Babble Maskers Created from Multi-speaker Speech for Speech Privacy Protection

    We investigated on an efficient masker for speech privacy protection. Previously, we proposed a speaker-dependent (SD) masker created from speech of the masked speaker. This masker decreased the speech intelligibility to a much lower level than conventional babble maskers. However, this masker needs to be prepared for each potential speaker, and may be expensive to create and maintain. We also investigated on a same gender single-speaker masker, where the masker is created from a different speaker of the same gender. We found that this masker works just as well as the SD maskers for some speakers, while it was not as efficient for others. In this paper, we created gender-dependent maskers from multiple same-gender speakers. This masker was proven to mask as well as the SD maskers for the same gender speakers. We now only need to maintain two maskers, one masker per gender.

  • A Comparison of Four Methods for Analog Speech Privacy

    Four well-known procedures for analog speech privacy have been compared in terms of residual intelligibility, bandwidth expansion, and encoding delay. Intelligibility scores have been determined from a perceptual experiment where about 70 untrained listeners were given the task of recognizing each of 200 spoken digits that occurred in a balanced set of 50 encrypted four-digit utterances, and by averaging resulting probabilities of correct digit recognition. Bandwidth expansion has been expressed in terms of a new segmental measure that is more sensitive to short-time bandwidth manipulations than a conventional, long-time-averaged power spectrum measurement. Encoding delay is a straightforward function of analog scrambler parameters. The scrambling procedures that have been compared are sample permutation (<tex>S</tex>), block permutation (<tex>B</tex>), frequency inversion (<tex>F</tex>), and a combination of methods<tex>B</tex>and<tex>F</tex>, denoted by [<tex>BF</tex>]. Sample permutations involved a contiguous set of L<inf>S</inf>(2 to 128) 8 kHz samples, while block permutations operated on a contiguous set of N<inf>B</inf>(4 to 128) speech segments each of which was L<inf>B</inf>(8 to 256) samples long. Frequency inversion is obtained by simply inverting the sign of every other Nyquist (8 kHz) sample. The parameters,<tex>L_{s},N_{B}</tex>, and L<inf>B</inf>, determine residual intelligibility as well as transmission properties such as encoding delay and bandwidth. The comparisons in our study provide a quantitative justification for the popular approach [<tex>BF</tex>]. For example, with<tex>N_{B} = 8</tex>and<tex>L_{B} =128</tex>, although the encoding delay is as much as 128 ms, the bandwidth expansion is only about 100 Hz (using the new segmental measure), and the digit intelligibility<tex>I</tex>is 20 percent. Note that in the specific problem of recognizing ten digits, purely random (input- independent) listener responses correspond to<tex>I = 10</tex>percent.



Standards related to Speech Privacy

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Speech Privacy"


Jobs related to Speech Privacy

Back to Top