Conferences related to Nuclear Weapons

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2019 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (SMC)

2019 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC2019) will be held in the south of Europe in Bari, one of the most beautiful and historical cities in Italy. The Bari region’s nickname is “Little California” for its nice weather and Bari's cuisine is one of Italian most traditional , based of local seafood and olive oil. SMC2019 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report up-to-the-minute innovations and developments, summarize state­of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems and cybernetics. Advances have importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience, and thereby improve quality of life.


2019 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting

The conference is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, electromagnetics, and radio science.


2019 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

This conference is the annual premier meeting on the use of instrumentation in the Nuclear and Medical fields. The meeting has a very long history of providing an exciting venue for scientists to present their latest advances, exchange ideas, renew existing collaboration and form new ones. The NSS portion of the conference is an ideal forum for scientists and engineers in the field of Nuclear Science, radiation instrumentation, software engineering and data acquisition. The MIC is one of the most informative venues on the state-of-the art use of physics, engineering, and mathematics in Nuclear Medicine and related imaging modalities, such as CT and increasingly so MRI, through the development of hybrid devices


2019 IEEE Pulsed Power & Plasma Science (PPPS)

Combined conference of the IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science and the IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference


2018 11th International Conference on Human System Interaction (HSI)

The HSI conference will cover research topics related to the traditional combination of hardware, software and human factors as well as theories and methods of psychology, and communication. The conference will focus not only on theories but also on practical insights related to Human System Interaction. HSI is widely applicable to all types of human activity including manufacturing, transport, supply chain, medical treatment , personal care (aged care, the elderly , the disabled), tele-health, education, business, government, the household and remote monitoring and control. Additionally, there are many new research areas open to Human System Interaction. During the conference we would like to inspire and provoke the audience to work on new ideas and solutions that could become standards for future Human System Interaction applications.

  • 2017 10th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    The HSI2017 conference covers both theory and applications in all the area of human system interaction. The topics of interests include, but are not limited to:- Artificial Intelligence- Human Machine Interaction- Education and Training- Cyber Security in HSI- Sociological ad Psychological Aspects of HSI- Cyber Physical Systems- Human Space Computing- Internet of Things and Smart Homes- Health Care and Assistive Devices- Extreme Interfaces- Humanity in Wireless Mesh Network- Vehicular System- Multimedia Human Communication- Personal Communication System- Personal Mobile Ad-hoc System- Wearable Network and System- Network Control and Management- Security, Privacy and Trust- Human Dependable System- Multi-agent System and Applications

  • 2016 9th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    Rapid improvement of information and computation technologies leads to the extending and boosting of human system interaction. A large variety of human activities are supported with the development of HSI in aspects of manufacturing, education, business, health and management. International Conference series on Human System Interactions have been serving as a platform for exchanging ideas, knowledge, skills and experiences in interactions between human and systems.

  • 2015 8th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    The HSI conference will cover research topics related to the traditional combination of hardware, software and human factors as well as theories and methods of psychology, and communication. The conference will focus not only on theories but also on practical insights related to Human System Interaction. HSI is widely applicable to all types of human activity including manufacturing, transport, supply chain, medical treatment , personal care (aged care, the elderly , the disabled), tele-health, education, business, government, the household and remote monitoring and control. Additionally, there are many new research areas open to Human System Interaction. During the conference we would like to inspire and provoke the audience to work on new ideas and solutions that could become standards for future Human System Interaction applications.

  • 2014 7th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    Rapid changes of information technologies lead to boosting the strength and efficiency of human activity. These technologies have an influence on every particular area of human life, including education, science, business, leisure time, entertainment, state administration, health care. Human life is greatly dependent on these systems

  • 2013 6th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    Rapid changes of information technologies lead to boosting the strength and efficiency of human activity. These technologies have an influence on every particular area of human life, including education, science, business, leisure time, entertainment, state administration, health care. Human life is greatly dependent on these systems

  • 2012 5th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    The conference covers theory, design and application of human-system interactions in the areas of science, education, business, industry, services, humanity, environment, health, and government.

  • 2011 4th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    The recent development of computational technologies contributes to introducing intelligent and interactive systems for supporting and extending human activities. International Conference series on Human System Interactions have been providing a platform for interdisciplinarily exchanging ideas, knowledge, skills and experiences in interactions between human and systems.

  • 2010 3rd International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    Rapid changes of information technologies lead to boosting the strength and efficiency of human activity. These technologies have an influence on every particular area of human life, including education, science, business, leisure time, entertainment, state administration, health care. Human life is greatly dependent on these systems efficiency and performance. HSI conference has been prepared as a platform for exchanging ideas, knowledge, skills and experiences in interactions between man and these s

  • 2009 2nd Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)

    Computers are today integrant parts of our life, embedded in more and more devices, objects, and systems. So the interactions between Human and Computers has evolved toward interactions between Human and Systems including the larger range of ubiquitous, pervasive computing. Human Systems Interaction 2009 aims to represent a meeting point for different communities, where to share experience and knowledge related to the interaction of human beings with such a broader range of systems.

  • 2008 Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI)


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Periodicals related to Nuclear Weapons

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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.


Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on

The theory, design and application of Control Systems. It shall encompass components, and the integration of these components, as are necessary for the construction of such systems. The word `systems' as used herein shall be interpreted to include physical, biological, organizational and other entities and combinations thereof, which can be represented through a mathematical symbolism. The Field of Interest: shall ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Nuclear Weapons

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Xplore Articles related to Nuclear Weapons

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Nuclear weapons reactors: too hot to handle?

IEEE Spectrum, 1989

Problems that arose in August 1988 during the startup of a reactor at the Savannah River nuclear weapons plant in Aiken, South Carolina, led to Congressional hearings on defense reactors in general and the indefinite closing of all three operational reactors at Savannah River. Stress-corrosion cracking and outmoded design features may make operation of reactors a risky business, and Westinghouse ...


Not so unthinkable [nuclear weapons]

IEEE Spectrum, 2003

Discusses developments which offer scenarios that, to some military strategists, would justify the use of nuclear weapons. The sorts of nuclear weapons likely to figure into war planners' recommendations are much smaller than those designed to wipe out entire cities, and they would be targeted at hardened, isolated military installations. Broadly speaking, nuclear weapons fall into two categories. Strategic weapons ...


Satellite mapping of the demolition of the rocky flats nuclear weapons plant

2007 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2007

We present two different change detection techniques to monitor surface changes that occurred at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility located immediately to the North West of the city of Denver, Colorado, USA. The site started being cleaned up and dismantled in 1998 and was completed in 2005. The first Change Detection method is based on a Maximum Likelihood classifier, ...


The globalization of nuclear weapons

IEEE Spectrum, 2004

What is it like to live in a world in which the materials and technology for making nuclear weapons are freely traded? We are in the midst of finding out. Earlier this year, investigators determined that Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan sold some of the technologies he used to build Pakistan's nuclear bomb to several governments that had long sought atomic ...


Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex network

Digest of Papers Ninth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, 1988. 'Storage Systems: Perspectives', 1988

The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is a collection of 11 government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by nine different contractors and the US DOE Albuquerque Operations Office. An effort is under way to automate the exchange of product-definition data between members of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). A description is presented of network components, their ...


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Educational Resources on Nuclear Weapons

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Nuclear weapons reactors: too hot to handle?

    Problems that arose in August 1988 during the startup of a reactor at the Savannah River nuclear weapons plant in Aiken, South Carolina, led to Congressional hearings on defense reactors in general and the indefinite closing of all three operational reactors at Savannah River. Stress-corrosion cracking and outmoded design features may make operation of reactors a risky business, and Westinghouse Electric Corp., which in April 1989 took over operation of the plant, now faces the problem of assessing risk, improving safety, and judging when, if ever, it is safe to restart the reactors. The history of the Savannah River plant is described, and the present issues are examined in the context of risk assessment.<<ETX>>

  • Not so unthinkable [nuclear weapons]

    Discusses developments which offer scenarios that, to some military strategists, would justify the use of nuclear weapons. The sorts of nuclear weapons likely to figure into war planners' recommendations are much smaller than those designed to wipe out entire cities, and they would be targeted at hardened, isolated military installations. Broadly speaking, nuclear weapons fall into two categories. Strategic weapons have explosive yields in the range of several hundred kilotons up to several megatons. Tactical weapons have much lower yields, down to a few kilotons. Strategic weapons were meant to destroy an entire city. Tactical nuclear weapons were intended for use at closer range-for example, on a battlefield, perhaps launched by a large artillery cannon.

  • Satellite mapping of the demolition of the rocky flats nuclear weapons plant

    We present two different change detection techniques to monitor surface changes that occurred at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility located immediately to the North West of the city of Denver, Colorado, USA. The site started being cleaned up and dismantled in 1998 and was completed in 2005. The first Change Detection method is based on a Maximum Likelihood classifier, while the other is an approach based on a Neural Network architecture called NAHIRI (Neural Architecture for High-Resolution Imagery) to produce change detection maps from very high-resolution satellite imagery. NAHIRI simultaneously exploits spectral and temporal information by adding a filter, directly stemming from the multi- temporal information, to the classification changes derived from the multi-spectral data. In fact, the distinctive feature of this method is that the NNs exploit both the multi-spectral and the multi- temporal information in parallel that are associated with the changed values of the pixel spectral reflectances. The quantitative results are analyzed in order to single out advantages and shortcomings of the two different approaches.

  • The globalization of nuclear weapons

    What is it like to live in a world in which the materials and technology for making nuclear weapons are freely traded? We are in the midst of finding out. Earlier this year, investigators determined that Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan sold some of the technologies he used to build Pakistan's nuclear bomb to several governments that had long sought atomic bombs, including Iran and Libya. Clearly; the threat of the "casual" use of nuclear weapons and of nuclear terrorism has been catapulted from the abstract to the alarmingly concrete. For the right price, an entire weapon might be obtainable on the black market. Only intensive, imaginative diplomacy and a massive demonstration of collective will on the part of the worldwide community can avert this nuclear catastrophe in the making. Sadly, both are in short supply today.

  • Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex network

    The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is a collection of 11 government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by nine different contractors and the US DOE Albuquerque Operations Office. An effort is under way to automate the exchange of product-definition data between members of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). A description is presented of network components, their interaction and some of the efforts to ensure security. The NWC network is a computer network that will allow the facilities to exchange, store, and manage shared information. The networking and storage capabilities are enhancements of systems available from commercial sources and from specific systems in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory.<<ETX>>

  • Nuclear weapons identification system

    A nuclear weapons identification system (NWIS) has been under development at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant since 1984. NWIS employs active neutron interrogation to obtain a variety of time and frequency analysis signature to identify nuclear weapons in containers. Advantages of NWIS are: (1) high sensitivity {small changes in configurations produce large changes in signatures}; (2) insensitivity of some signatures to background radiation, {useful for storage configurations or for tracking of secondaries through the first stage of dismantlement since the presence of the primary on the assembled system does not affect some signatures for the secondary}; (3) nonintrusive {does not reveal design information, which makes it useful for bilateral treaties or by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)}; and (4) very difficult to deceive.

  • A novel method for determining pulse counting circuitry dead time using the Nuclear Weapons Inspection System

    A novel method for measuring dead time in nuclear pulse processing circuitry has been developed using the autocorrelation measurement capability of the Nuclear Weapons Inspection System (NWIS). Initially developed for active neutron interrogation of nuclear weapons and other fissile assemblies, NWIS employs a custom gallium arsenide application specific integrated circuit and a new signature analysis software package to simultaneously acquire and display the autocorrelation and cross-correlation spectra of up to five detector/electronics systems. The system operates at clock frequencies up to 1 GHz, permitting the collection of timing pulses in bins as narrow as 1 ns. In normal operation NWIS uses well characterized detectors and constant fraction discriminators, but it may also be configured to accept pulses from any circuit and to use the autocorrelation spectrum to accurately determine dead- time. Unlike traditional dead-time assessment techniques that typically require multiple sources and an assumed dead-time model, NWIS provides single measurement assessment of circuit dead time and does not require an assumed dead-time model or a calibrated high count-rate source.

  • A novel method for determining pulse counting circuitry dead time using the nuclear weapons inspection system

    A novel method for measuring dead time in nuclear pulse processing circuitry has been developed using the autocorrelation measurement capability of the Nuclear Weapons Inspection System (NWIS). Initially developed for active neutron interrogation of nuclear weapons and other fissile assemblies, NWIS employs a custom gallium arsenide application specific integrated circuit and a new signature analysis software package to simultaneously acquire and display the autocorrelation and cross-correlation spectra of up to five detector/electronics systems. The system operates at clock frequencies up to 1 GHz, permitting the collection of timing pulses in bins as narrow as 1 ns. In normal operation NWIS uses well characterized detectors and constant fraction discriminators, but it may also be configured to accept pulses from any circuit and to use the autocorrelation spectrum to accurately determine dead- time. Unlike traditional dead-time assessment techniques that typically require multiple sources and an assumed dead-time model, NWIS provides single- measurement assessment of circuit dead time and does not require an assumed dead-time model or a calibrated high count-rate source.

  • A low dead time variable CMOS delay for the Nuclear Weapons Identification System

    The architecture and performance of a new CMOS, low dead time, variable delay is described. This delay was developed to provide channel synchronization in the front-end electronics ASIC of the Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS). The delay is variable over a 500 ns range in steps of less than 100 ps. Low dead time is achieved by using a switched parallel channel architecture. The delay channels are feedback stabilized by using a phase locked loop with a crystal reference. A prototype has been fabricated in the 1.2 /spl mu/m AMI process.

  • Detection of uranium-based nuclear weapons using neutron-induced fission

    The radiation emitted by weapons based entirely on highly enriched uranium can often be easily shielded. Verification of a treaty that limits the number of such weapons may require an active technique, such as interrogating the suspect assembly with an external neutron source and measuring the number of fission neutrons produced. Difficulties include distinguishing between source and fission neutrons, the variations in yield for different materials and geometries, and the possibility of non-nuclear weapons that may contain significant amounts of fissionable depleted uranium. The authors describe simple measurements that test the induced-fission technique using an isotopic Am-Li source, a novel energy-sensitive neutron detector, and several small assemblies containing /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, lead, and polyethylene. In all cases studied, the neutron yields above the source energy are larger for the /sup 235/U assemblies than for assemblies containing only lead or depleted uranium. For more complex geometries, corrections for source transmission may be necessary.<<ETX>>



Standards related to Nuclear Weapons

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Jobs related to Nuclear Weapons

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