IEEE Organizations related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

No organizations are currently tagged "Brain-computer Interfaces"



Conferences related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE)

The International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE) is soliciting technical papersfor oral and poster presentation at ICCE 2018. ICCE has a strong conference history coupledwith a tradition of attracting leading authors and delegates from around the world.Papers reporting new developments in all areas of consumer electronics are invited. Topics around the major theme will be the content ofspecial sessions and tutorials.


ICASSP 2020 - 2020 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

The ICASSP meeting is the world's largest and most comprehensive technical conference focused on signal processing and its applications. The conference will feature world-class speakers, tutorials, exhibits, and over 50 lecture and poster sessions.


2019 7th International Winter Conference on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)

Brain-Computer Interface, etc.


2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

Neural Engineering

  • 2017 8th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural Engineering is an emerging core discipline,which coalesces neuroscience with engineering.Members of both the Neuroscience and Engineering Communities areencouraged to attend this highly multidisciplinarymeeting. The conference will highlight the emergingengineering innovations in the restoration andenhancement of impaired sensory, motor, andcognitive functions, novel engineering for deepeningknowledge of brain function, and advanced designand use of neurotechnologies

  • 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problemsassociated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, theelectrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, theanalysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi -scale from the single -cell and to the systemlevels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implantsand wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problems associated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, the electrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, the analysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi-scale from the single-cell and to the system levels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implants and wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2007 3rd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2005 2nd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2003 1st International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

No periodicals are currently tagged "Brain-computer Interfaces"


Most published Xplore authors for Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

Recent advances in brain-computer interfaces

2007 IEEE 9th Workshop on Multimedia Signal Processing, 2007

A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that translates brain activity into commands for a computer or other devices. In other words, a BCI allows users to act on their environment by using only brain activity, without using peripheral nerves and muscles. The major goal of BCI research is to develop systems that allow disabled users to communicate with ...


Tutorial: Brain mediated human-robot interaction

2011 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2011

The use of brain-generated signals for human-robot interaction has gained increasing attention in the last years. Indeed brain-controlled robots can potentially be employed to substitute motor capabilities (e.g. brain- controlled prosthetics for amputees or patients with spinal cord injuries); to help in the restoration of such functions (e.g. as a tool for stroke rehabilitation) as well as non-clinical applications like ...


Prolog to the Section on Neurotechnological Systems: The Brain–Computer Interface

Proceedings of the IEEE, 2012

None


Plenary Keynote 1

2009 International Conference on Adaptive and Intelligent Systems, 2009

In this presentation a look is taken at how the use of implant and electrode technology can be employed to create biological brains for robots, to enable human enhancement and to diminish the effects of certain neural illnesses. In all cases the end result is to increase the range of abilities of the recipients. An indication is given of a ...


The effects of self-movement, observation, and imagination on /spl mu/ rhythms and readiness potentials (RP's): toward a brain-computer interface (BCI)

IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering, 2000

Current movement-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI's) utilize spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythms associated with movement, such as the /spl mu/ rhythm, or responses time-locked to movements that are averaged across multiple trials, such as the readiness potential (RP), as control signals. In one study, the authors report that the /spl mu/ rhythm is not only modulated by the expression of self-generated movement ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Recent advances in brain-computer interfaces

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that translates brain activity into commands for a computer or other devices. In other words, a BCI allows users to act on their environment by using only brain activity, without using peripheral nerves and muscles. The major goal of BCI research is to develop systems that allow disabled users to communicate with other persons, to control artificial limbs, or to control their environment. To achieve this goal, many aspects of BCI systems are currently being investigated. Research areas include evaluation of invasive and noninvasive technologies to measure brain activity, evaluation of control signals (i.e. patterns of brain activity that can be used for communication), development of algorithms for translation of brain signals into computer commands, and the development of new BCI applications. In this paper we give an overview of the aspects of BCI research mentioned above and highlight recent developments and open problems.

  • Tutorial: Brain mediated human-robot interaction

    The use of brain-generated signals for human-robot interaction has gained increasing attention in the last years. Indeed brain-controlled robots can potentially be employed to substitute motor capabilities (e.g. brain- controlled prosthetics for amputees or patients with spinal cord injuries); to help in the restoration of such functions (e.g. as a tool for stroke rehabilitation) as well as non-clinical applications like telepresence or entertainment. This half-day tutorial gives an introduction to the field of brain-computer interfaces and presents several design principles required to successfully employ them for robot control.

  • Prolog to the Section on Neurotechnological Systems: The Brain–Computer Interface

    None

  • Plenary Keynote 1

    In this presentation a look is taken at how the use of implant and electrode technology can be employed to create biological brains for robots, to enable human enhancement and to diminish the effects of certain neural illnesses. In all cases the end result is to increase the range of abilities of the recipients. An indication is given of a number of areas in which such technology has already had a profound effect, a key element being the need for a clear interface linking a biological brain directly with computer technology. The emphasis is clearly placed on practical scientific studies that have been and are being undertaken and reported on. The area of focus is notably the use of electrode technology, where a connection is made directly with the cerebral cortex and/or nervous system. The presentation will consider the future in which robots have biological, or part-biological, brains and in which neural implants link the human nervous system bi-directionally with technology and the Internet.

  • The effects of self-movement, observation, and imagination on /spl mu/ rhythms and readiness potentials (RP's): toward a brain-computer interface (BCI)

    Current movement-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI's) utilize spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythms associated with movement, such as the /spl mu/ rhythm, or responses time-locked to movements that are averaged across multiple trials, such as the readiness potential (RP), as control signals. In one study, the authors report that the /spl mu/ rhythm is not only modulated by the expression of self-generated movement but also by the observation and imagination of movement. In another study, the authors show that simultaneous self-generated multiple limb movements exhibit properties distinct from those of single limb movements. Identification and classification of these signals with pattern recognition techniques provides the basis for the development of a practical BCI.

  • Neural networks update

    Summary form only given, as follows. Neural networks have been intensively studied as a discipline in their own right in the last five years (late 1980s, early 1990s). Initial claims were extremely ambitious; by using the brain's computing principles, networks would eliminate programming, revolutionize computer architecture and sensor interfacing, make analog VLSI a reality, and give guidance to a new understanding of human cognition. Work in two areas is described: statistical methods to deal with classification, prediction, and control in data-rich, intuition-poor problems; and VLSI solutions, both in digital and analog styles, to accommodate these architectures.<>

  • A virtual reality testbed for brain-computer interface research

    Virtual reality promisers to extend the realm of possible brain-computer interface (BCI) prototypes. Most of the work using electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in VR has focussed on brain-body actuated control, where biological signals from the body as well as the brain are used. The authors show that when subjects are allowed to move and act normally in an immersive virtual environment, cognitive evoked potential signals can still be obtained and used reliably. A single trial accuracy average of 85% for recognizing the differences between evoked potentials at red and yellow stop lights is presented and future directions discussed.

  • Brain-computer interface research at the Neil Squire Foundation

    The ultimate goal of the authors' research is to utilize voluntary motor- related potentials recorded from the scalp in a direct Brain Computer Interface for asynchronous control applications. This type of interface will allow an individual with a high-level impairment to have effective and sophisticated control of devices such as wheelchairs, robotic assistive appliances, computers, and neural prostheses.

  • Understanding neural plasticity for programming brain-machine systems

    The rapidly emerging field of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) establishes a spectacular convergence between literature and neuroscience. But brain-machine interfaces emerge from two well-defined practical goals: creating more powerful computers and giving new hope to a broad segment of the disabled population. During the last century, the study of computers and of the brain have evolved in a reciprocal metaphor: the brain is investigated as an organ that processes information and computers have been developed starting from the dream of creating an artificial brain. Brain-machine interfaces provide us with the perspective of moving beyond metaphor and considering the possibility of accessing the computational power of neural tissue. Despite the speed with which today's computers execute billions of operations, our brains have still unsurpassed performance when it comes to recognizing a face or controlling the complex dynamics of the arm. The computational power of biological systems has sparked research aimed at mimicking neurobiological processes in artificial system. Perhaps the most well-known outcomes of this research are artificial neural-networks, which attempt to emulate some of the key features of neural information processing. More recently, a new idea has begun to take shape: the idea of constructing hybrid computers in which neurons are grown over a semiconductor substrate.

  • Algorithms for on-line differentiation of neuroelectric activities

    Summary form only given, as follows. The complete presentation was not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI) aims at making use of brain signals for e.g. the control of objects, spelling, gaming and so on. This talk will first provide a very brief overview of Brain Computer Interface from a machine learning and signal processing perspective. In particular it shows the wealth, the complexity and the difficulties of the data available, a truely enormous challenge: In real-time a multi-variate very strongly noise contaminated data stream is to be processed and neuroelectric activities are to be accurately differentiated. Finally, I report in more detail about the Berlin Brain Computer (BBCI) Interface that is based on EEG signals and take the audience all the way from the measured signal, the preprocessing and filtering, the classification to the respective application. BCI as a new channel for man- machine communication is discussed in a clincial setting and for gaming.



Standards related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Brain-computer Interfaces"


Jobs related to Brain-computer Interfaces

Back to Top