IEEE Organizations related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

No organizations are currently tagged "Short-circuit Currents"



Conferences related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

No conferences are currently tagged "Short-circuit Currents"


Periodicals related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

No periodicals are currently tagged "Short-circuit Currents"


Most published Xplore authors for Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

The use of power-limiting reactances with large turbo-alternators

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1911

In large electric power systems the maintenance of a very high degree of reliability, that is, continuity and uniformity of service, must be the constant aim and is one of the principal problems of the engineer. While the problems during the earlier years of central station work often appeared very difficult, the advent of the large capacity, high-speed turbo-generators coupled ...


IEEE/IEC International Standard for high-voltage switchgear and controlgear - Part 37-013: Alternating current generator circuit-breakers: Corrigendum 1

IEC IEEE 62271-37-013:2015/COR1:2017, 2017

None


IEEE Draft Standard for Common Requirements for Testing of AC Capacitance Current Switching Devices over 1000V

IEEE PC37.100.2/D5, May 2015, 2015

Common requirements for testing of AC capacitive current switching devices with nominal system voltage above 1000 V are provided in this standard


Discussion on “protective reactances in large power stations” (Lyman, Rossman and Perry), New York, February 25, 1914. (see proceedings for February, 1914)

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1914

Philip Torchio: The authors have assumed that the generators have 10 per cent internal reactance, and some of the curves have been figured on that percentage. Although there may be modern machines that are being designed with the object of high internal reactance in view which have an internal reactance as high as stated, the great majority, or practically all ...


Discussion on “the use of power limiting reactances with large turbo-alternators,” “some recent tests of oil circuit breakers” and “development of the modern central station.” Chicago, June 27, 1911. (see proceedings for July, 1911)

Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1911

None


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The use of power-limiting reactances with large turbo-alternators

    In large electric power systems the maintenance of a very high degree of reliability, that is, continuity and uniformity of service, must be the constant aim and is one of the principal problems of the engineer. While the problems during the earlier years of central station work often appeared very difficult, the advent of the large capacity, high-speed turbo-generators coupled to systems containing hundreds of miles of transmission lines, made them much more complex and they took on a far more serious aspect.

  • IEEE/IEC International Standard for high-voltage switchgear and controlgear - Part 37-013: Alternating current generator circuit-breakers: Corrigendum 1

    None

  • IEEE Draft Standard for Common Requirements for Testing of AC Capacitance Current Switching Devices over 1000V

    Common requirements for testing of AC capacitive current switching devices with nominal system voltage above 1000 V are provided in this standard

  • Discussion on “protective reactances in large power stations” (Lyman, Rossman and Perry), New York, February 25, 1914. (see proceedings for February, 1914)

    Philip Torchio: The authors have assumed that the generators have 10 per cent internal reactance, and some of the curves have been figured on that percentage. Although there may be modern machines that are being designed with the object of high internal reactance in view which have an internal reactance as high as stated, the great majority, or practically all of the machines in central stations at the present time, have internal reactances considerably smaller than 10 per cent. On 25-cycle machines the internal reactance will be 5 per cent or less. In such cases if you had assumed 5 per pent internal generator reactance, the figures and curves presented would have been considerably different and would have shown that there is little gain in installing bus reactances in excess of 12 to 15 per cent.

  • Discussion on “the use of power limiting reactances with large turbo-alternators,” “some recent tests of oil circuit breakers” and “development of the modern central station.” Chicago, June 27, 1911. (see proceedings for July, 1911)

    None

  • Calculation of Short Circuit Currents in HVDC Systems

    This paper discusses the effect of short circuits on the DC side of HVDC systems. Special attention is given to the control system and its influence on the magnitude of the short circuit current. Determination of the fault is done in two ways: by means of simulation (here PSCAD(R) is used) and by applying the IEC 61660 standard. This standard deals with short circuit currents in DC auxiliary installations in power plants and substations. Analysis covers both classic, network-driven (thyristor-based) HVDC as well as self-driven voltage source converter HVDC (IGBT-based). The underlying differences of these two HVDC concepts result in completely different short circuit currents in the case of a fault on the DC side. The simulated short circuit currents are compared to the values obtained by IEC 61660, in order to check whether this standard can be also used for HVDC systems. Some principle differences between auxiliary DC systems and HVDC transmission systems are discussed on this basis. The paper concludes with general comments on the transient and steady- state current characteristics for a short circuit on the DC side of HVDC systems. Understanding of such fault current characteristics and the influence of the control system on them are important prerequisites on the way to multi- terminal HVDC systems.

  • Short-Circuit Current Ratings: Key Considerations for the Safety of Commercial and Industrial Electrical Systems

    The interrupting rating (IR) and short-circuit current rating (SCCR) of equipment is a key consideration for the installation of equipment in electrical distribution systems. To emphasize this consideration, the 2005 National Electrical Code (NEC) added SCCR marking requirements for various types of equipment that previously was not required to be marked. The marked SCCR of equipment is determined by the product standards as part of the listing and labeling process of the equipment or an approved method, such as UL 508a, UL Standard for Safety for Industrial Control Panels. UL 508a supplement SB is an analytical (nontested) method of determining the SCCR of industrial control panels. This method basically determines the "weak link" of all power circuit components in the industrial control panel and the lowest- rated component then determines the assembly rating. Additional changes to the 2011 NEC have been made to ensure that equipment has sufficient SCCRs for the available short-circuit (fault) current where the equipment is installed.

  • The transient reactions of alternators

    This paper is confined to demonstrating the existence of a characteristic of alternators provisionally named the transient impedance and to investigating the influence of this characteristic on a. The maximum and minimum currents flowing through a 12,000-kw turbo-alternator with and without external reactance coils, under various short circuit conditions. b. The maximum and minimum currents into different classes of faults from a system operating several such units in parallel. c. The maximum cross currents obtainable when paralleling a unit to the system considered in (b), and, d. The torque developed by the maximum currents of (a) and (b).

  • Operating characteristics of large turbo-generators

    The requirements of the station engineer, with regard to the operating characteristics of large alternators, have materially changed during the last few years, concurrently with the rapid increase of size, measured in kw., of the individual power houses and of the individual generating units. Some characteristics which ten years ago were striven for, are now avoided and considered actually detrimental.

  • Time-limit relays

    In power stations and sub-stations feeding large alternating-and direct- current distribution systems, relays form a necessary part of the station equipment for the protection of apparatus and feeders, and for the purpose of rendering the operation of a system automatic. In connection with the operation of oil-switches on high-pressure alternating-current systems the function of the relay is to close the control-circuit to the switch, thereby opening the main circuit when the current exceeds the value at which the relay is adjusted to operate. Not taking into consideration the time-element of the switch, its operation would be practically instantaneous if controlled by a simple relay. Therefore, since heavy currents due to swings of the load may often flow for such short periods that it would not be desirable to open the circuit, relays are provided with some form of time-limiting device by means of which the length of time a given current may flow without operating the switch can be adjusted to meet existing conditions.



Standards related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Short-circuit Currents"


Jobs related to Short-circuit Currents

Back to Top