IEEE Organizations related to Medical Devices

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Conferences related to Medical Devices

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2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS)

IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS) is an annual conference coordinated by the Plasma Science and Application Committee (PSAC) of the IEEE Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


2019 Annual Reliability and Maintainability Symposium (RAMS)

Tutorials and original papers on reliability, maintainability, safety, risk management, and logistics


2019 IEEE 32nd International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems (CBMS)

CBMS 2019 will provide an international forum to discuss the latest developments in the field of computational medicine, biomedical informatics and related fields. During the CBMS symposium, there will be regular and special track (ST) sessions with technical contributions reviewed and selected by an international programme committee, as well as keynote talks and tutorials given by leading experts in their fields. Regular and ST presentations will cover a broad range of issues in related to areas in the context of medical informatics, e-Health, computer vision, healthcare games, software systems in medicine, big data analytics in healthcare, cognitive computing in healthcare, telemedicine systems, medical education, HCI in healthcare, web-based medical information, active and healthy aging systems, technology in clinical and healthcare research, among others.


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Periodicals related to Medical Devices

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No periodicals are currently tagged "Medical Devices"


Most published Xplore authors for Medical Devices

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Xplore Articles related to Medical Devices

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IEEE Draft Recommended Practice for Common Framework of Location Services (LS) for Healthcare

IEEE P1847/D1, Mar 2019, 2019

This recommended practice contains a common framework of Location 1 Services for Healthcare (LSH). The framework will include (1) LSH conceptual information model and (2) LSH common terminology.


IEEE Draft for Health Informatics - Personal Health Device Communication - Part 10419: Device Specialization - Insulin Pump - Corrigendum 1

IEEE P11073-10419-2015/Cor1/D8, April 2016, 2016

Within the context of the ISO/IEEE 11073 family of standards for device communication, a normative definition of communication between personal telehealth insulin pump devices and compute engines (e.g., cell phones, personal computers, personal health appliances, set top boxes) in a manner that enables plug-and-play interoperability, is established in this standard. Appropriate portions of existing standards including ISO/IEEE 11073 terminology, information ...


IEEE Standard for Wearable Cuffless Blood Pressure Measuring Devices

IEEE P1708/D04, June 2014, 2014

IEEE Std 1708 establishes a normative definition of wearable cuffless blood pressure (BP) measuring devices and the objective performance evaluation of this kind of device. The standard is independent of the form of the device or the vehicle to which the device is attached or in which it is embedded. The standard is applicable to all types of wearable BP ...


Technology You Can Swallow: Moving Beyond Wearable Sensors, Researchers Are Creating Ingestible Ones

IEEE Pulse, 2018

Around 6 p.m. each evening, the streets of Boston's suburbs come alive with the physically fit and those aspiring to be. They are runners, bikers, walkers, and scooter riders of all different body shapes and ages who would seem to have little in common except one thing-an electronic band wrapped around their wrist. For many of these people, it's hard ...


Signal Processing Powers Next-Generation Prosthetics: Researchers Investigate Techniques That Enable Artificial Limbs to Behave More Like Their Natural Counterparts [Special Reports]

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, 2018

Prosthetic limbs have improved significantly over the past several years, and signal processing has played a key role in allowing these devices to operate more smoothly and precisely on command. Now, researchers are taking the next step forward by using signal processing approaches and methods to develop prosthetics that not only function reliably and efficiently but give wearers more natural ...


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Educational Resources on Medical Devices

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • IEEE Draft Recommended Practice for Common Framework of Location Services (LS) for Healthcare

    This recommended practice contains a common framework of Location 1 Services for Healthcare (LSH). The framework will include (1) LSH conceptual information model and (2) LSH common terminology.

  • IEEE Draft for Health Informatics - Personal Health Device Communication - Part 10419: Device Specialization - Insulin Pump - Corrigendum 1

    Within the context of the ISO/IEEE 11073 family of standards for device communication, a normative definition of communication between personal telehealth insulin pump devices and compute engines (e.g., cell phones, personal computers, personal health appliances, set top boxes) in a manner that enables plug-and-play interoperability, is established in this standard. Appropriate portions of existing standards including ISO/IEEE 11073 terminology, information models, application profile standards, and transport standards are leveraged. The use of specific term codes, formats, and behaviors in telehealth environments restricting optionality in base frameworks in favor of interoperability are specified. A common core of communication functionality for personal telehealth insulin pump devices is defined. This standard corrects errors that have been identified in the IEEE Std 11073-10419-2015.

  • IEEE Standard for Wearable Cuffless Blood Pressure Measuring Devices

    IEEE Std 1708 establishes a normative definition of wearable cuffless blood pressure (BP) measuring devices and the objective performance evaluation of this kind of device. The standard is independent of the form of the device or the vehicle to which the device is attached or in which it is embedded. The standard is applicable to all types of wearable BP measurement devices including epidermal and unobtrusive BP devices that have different modes of operation (e.g., to measure short-term, long-term, snapshot, continuous, beat(s)-to-beat(s) BP, or BP variability). This standard is, however, limited to evaluation of devices that do not use a cuff during measurement and do not cover evaluation of all sphygmomanometers that are used with an occluding or inflatable cuff for the indirect determination of BP on the upper arm or wrist. This standard provides guidelines for manufacturers to qualify and validate their products, potential purchasers or users to evaluate and select prospective products, and health care professionals to understand the manufacturing practices on wearable BP devices.

  • Technology You Can Swallow: Moving Beyond Wearable Sensors, Researchers Are Creating Ingestible Ones

    Around 6 p.m. each evening, the streets of Boston's suburbs come alive with the physically fit and those aspiring to be. They are runners, bikers, walkers, and scooter riders of all different body shapes and ages who would seem to have little in common except one thing-an electronic band wrapped around their wrist. For many of these people, it's hard to imagine life without the daily nagging from a personal health device to meet their daily prescript of 10,000 steps. These wearable devices have become ubiquitous not just in Boston but around the world, constantly gathering personal health data such as perspiration, heartbeats, movements, acceleration, footsteps, blood pressure, sleep, and an increasing number of externally detectible bodily processes. Cisco Systems reported that, last year, 325 million wearable devices were connected worldwide, a number predicted to more than double by 2019. But their popularity has left some wondering if this sort of technology could be taken beyond the surface of the skin to places deep within our bodies-not wearable sensors but ingestible ones.

  • Signal Processing Powers Next-Generation Prosthetics: Researchers Investigate Techniques That Enable Artificial Limbs to Behave More Like Their Natural Counterparts [Special Reports]

    Prosthetic limbs have improved significantly over the past several years, and signal processing has played a key role in allowing these devices to operate more smoothly and precisely on command. Now, researchers are taking the next step forward by using signal processing approaches and methods to develop prosthetics that not only function reliably and efficiently but give wearers more natural control over artificial arms, hands, and legs. Researchers at London's Imperial College, for instance, have developed a prosthetic arm sensor technology that detects signals transmitted by nerves in the spinal cord. To control the prosthetic, the wearer simply has to think about controlling a phantom arm and imagine a simple maneuver, such as pinching two fingers together. The sensor technology then interprets electrical signals sent from the spine and uses them as commands. Existing robotic prosthetic arms are controlled by having the wearer twitch remaining muscles in his or her shoulder or arm. The new approach detects signals from spinal motor neurons in parts of the body that were left undamaged by the amputation.

  • Neural Interfaces for Implantable Medical Devices: Circuit Design Considerations for Sensing, Stimulation, and Safety

    Circuit design is one of the key technologies for enabling implantable medical devices. Understanding the electrode model as well as the associated electrochemical processes is important for successful circuit design of these devices. Managing power consumption and noise (thermal and 1/f ) while meeting application-specific requirements is important for neural sensing, and safety is absolutely essential for stimulation.

  • Signal Processing Research Resonates with Hearing Loss Sufferers [Special Reports]

    Hearing enhancement is an area where signal processing technology makes a direct and positive impact on human lives. By allowing people with hearing loss to perceive voices, music, and other sounds more clearly and naturally, signal processing improves the quality of life for countless millions of people worldwide.

  • American National Standard Recommended Practice for an On-Site, Ad Hoc Test Method for Estimating Electromagnetic Immunity of Medical Devices to Radiated Radio-Frequency (RF) Emissions from RF Transmitters

    The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide an ad hoc test method to estimate the electromagnetic immunity of medical devices and help identify interference issues that might exist with critical medical devices as a result of emissions from RF transmitters increasingly used in health-care facilities, particularly by doctors, staff, patients, and visitors. RF transmitters include two-way radios, walkie-talkies, mobile phones, wireless-enabled laptop computers and similar devices, RFID readers, networked mp3 players, two-way pagers, wireless PDAs, and wireless medical devices. The test protocol is designed to be performed as follows: a) By clinical engineers, biomedical engineers, and other technical personnel b) In a way that is relatively rapid and practical c) In an area and with equipment that are commonly available d) To identify specific effects and thresholds (i.e., transmit power and distance) to provide the basic information needed to develop a mitigation action plan e) To generate test results that can be used in the formulation of policies and procedures for managing the use of RF transmitters within a health-care facility. A preferred method (5.6.2) and several alternative RF sources and methods (Annex C) for ad hoc testing are outlined in this recommended practice to allow flexibility with regard to the time, personnel, and resources available to perform the testing. As a result, these different options provide different levels of accuracy and comprehensiveness. The most appropriate ad hoc test strategy will depend on the needs and resources of the user of this recommended practice. This recommended practice also provides guidance for selection of the medical devices to be tested, operation of RF transmitters used as RF test sources, and assessment of test results. The preferred method for evaluation in most circumstances involves the use of the actual RF transmitter(s) (e.g., mobile phones and portable and mobile radios) as test sources to generate the same RF signals that would be encountered in the health-care facility. This approach also assumes that the end user has limited time and resources, a small number of critical medical devices to test, a limited space in which to perform the testing, and a single or a small number of specific RF transmitter signals to examine. In this preferred method, the RF transmitter is placed in a constantly transmitting state (i.e., test mode). The tests can be performed with or without an electric-field- strength (E-field) meter, although the use of an E-field meter is recommended. Another important function of this recommended practice is to define a consistent test protocol to allow results to be obtained and compared within and across institutions. Clinical and biomedical engineers have performed their own rudimentary (ad hoc) electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) testing using in-house methodology, RF transmitter sources, and medical devices. As a result, a comparison of the findings between health-care organizations might not be appropriate. To facilitate a comparison between health-care organizations, it is important that the recommendations herein are followed, deviations are kept to a minimum, and the testing is performed as consistently as possible. Policies and procedures for mitigation of electromagnetic interference (EMI)^2 in health-care facilities, including the use or restriction of specific RF transmitters within specific areas, often called an exclusion zone, should be based on objective information, including that obtained by the use of this test method. A common problem with exclusion zones is that they are difficult to enforce. With regard to purchase evaluation, confirming that medical devices conform to voluntary EMC immunity standards can provide some information, although many RF transmitters are able to exceed these immunity levels greatly when held close to a medical device.

  • Convergence Revolution Comes to Wearables: Multiple Advances are Taking Biosensor Networks to the Next Level in Health Care

    In the field of wearable biomedical sensors, the convergence revolution is more than a fanciful, utopian view of the way innovation should be done. Medical-grade wearable sensors rely on it. Their development requires technical know-how, computing expertise, clinical input, and collaboration-a true meeting of the minds to permit the conversion of wearables from neat gadgets into practical and proficient tools that will propel health care to new heights. Beyond the increasing miniaturization of hardware and the shift to wireless communication technology, flexible electronics and more powerful computing capabilities, including application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), have enabled new work on body sensor networks (BSNs) that monitor, analyze, and make sense of body signals for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of health disorders. Developments in processing, such as sensor-connected nodes combined with evolving algorithms and decreasing power requirements, have also contributed. In addition, new approaches to subjective measures (pain and emotion) have opened possibilities.

  • Possibility of Fusion: Cosmetic Research and Electronics

    Cosmetics are beneficial tools that fulfill the wishes of people to remain youthful. We as a cosmetic manufacturer have conducted various research and development to provide customers with those excellent tools. In the research and development of cosmetics for skin and hair, sensing technology has greatly played an important role. This report will explain the roles of sensing technology as it outlines the current situation of cosmetic research. Furthermore, the possibility of the further fusion of cosmetic research and electronics will be examined.



Standards related to Medical Devices

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No standards are currently tagged "Medical Devices"