IEEE Organizations related to Self-replicating Machines

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Conferences related to Self-replicating Machines

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Periodicals related to Self-replicating Machines

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Most published Xplore authors for Self-replicating Machines

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Xplore Articles related to Self-replicating Machines

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A Macroscopic View of Self-Replication

Proceedings of the IEEE, 2004

None


An autonomous self-replicating robotic system

Proceedings 2003 IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM 2003), 2003

The concept of self-replicating machines was introduced more than fifty years ago by John von Neumann. However, to our knowledge a fully autonomous self- replicating robot has not been implemented until now. Here we describe a fully autonomous prototype that demonstrates robotic self replication. This work builds on our previous results in remote-controlled robotic replication and semi-autonomous replicating robotic systems.


A semi-autonomous replicating robotic system

Proceedings 2003 IEEE International Symposium on Computational Intelligence in Robotics and Automation. Computational Intelligence in Robotics and Automation for the New Millennium (Cat. No.03EX694), 2003

The concept of self-replicating machines was introduced more than fifty years ago by John van Neumann. However, a fully autonomous self-replicating robot has yet to be implemented. This paper discusses our ongoing research on self- replicating robots. Here we describe a semi-autonomous prototype that can demonstrate replication under human supervision. This work builds on our previous results in remote-controlled robotic ...


Self-replication of 3D universal structures

Proceedings. 2004 NASA/DoD Conference on Evolvable Hardware, 2004., 2004

After a survey of some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents the construction based self-replication of universal 3D structures. This self-replication process is achieved by translation and transcription of a configuration information in a three-dimensional data and signals cellular automaton (DSCA). The specifications and the design of the basic three- dimensional cell of the automaton results in a new ...


Impact of structuring elements on agents' behavior in social simulations

2009 IEEE Symposium on Intelligent Agents, 2009

Agent-based social simulations have been widely used to help social scientists on the understanding of several social phenomena. Traditional approaches to agents most often tackle well the behavioral and the temporal aspects of the carried out simulations. However, a frequent limitation in social simulations is the lack of simultaneous support for spatial specifications of social structures. That is, the incorporation ...



Educational Resources on Self-replicating Machines

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • A Macroscopic View of Self-Replication

    None

  • An autonomous self-replicating robotic system

    The concept of self-replicating machines was introduced more than fifty years ago by John von Neumann. However, to our knowledge a fully autonomous self- replicating robot has not been implemented until now. Here we describe a fully autonomous prototype that demonstrates robotic self replication. This work builds on our previous results in remote-controlled robotic replication and semi-autonomous replicating robotic systems.

  • A semi-autonomous replicating robotic system

    The concept of self-replicating machines was introduced more than fifty years ago by John van Neumann. However, a fully autonomous self-replicating robot has yet to be implemented. This paper discusses our ongoing research on self- replicating robots. Here we describe a semi-autonomous prototype that can demonstrate replication under human supervision. This work builds on our previous results in remote-controlled robotic replication with the added feature that many subtasks in the replication process are now autonomously performed by the robot. We believe this to be an important step in the realization of fully autonomous self-replicating robots.

  • Self-replication of 3D universal structures

    After a survey of some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents the construction based self-replication of universal 3D structures. This self-replication process is achieved by translation and transcription of a configuration information in a three-dimensional data and signals cellular automaton (DSCA). The specifications and the design of the basic three- dimensional cell of the automaton results in a new and straightforward methodology for the self-replication of 3D computing machines of any dimensions.

  • Impact of structuring elements on agents' behavior in social simulations

    Agent-based social simulations have been widely used to help social scientists on the understanding of several social phenomena. Traditional approaches to agents most often tackle well the behavioral and the temporal aspects of the carried out simulations. However, a frequent limitation in social simulations is the lack of simultaneous support for spatial specifications of social structures. That is, the incorporation of placement and neighboring of real world conceptual structuring elements such as houses, hospitals, roads, and workplaces. Moreover, the incorporation of mechanisms that affords assessing means on the action selection of all social agents is deemed also to be seminal. In this paper we use the plausible agents matrix (PAX) framework to investigate the influence of these social structuring elements on the intelligent agents' behaviors, considering some disease dissemination scenarios. Results obtained show how influential is spatiality (i.e. consideration of the abovementioned structuring elements) on the overall epidemics understanding and sought control. These findings are instrumental for the development of more effective tools to support decision makers, namely the ones who work with health care and other public policies.

  • A Memoryless Robot that Assembles Seven Subsystems to Copy Itself

    This paper presents a robot that can assemble exact functional replicas of itself from seven more basic parts/subsystems. The robot follows lines on the floor using light sensors and a simple control circuit without any onboard memory. It performs a self-replication task comparable in difficulty to those of previous self-replicating robots, but with a greatly simplified control system and reduced overall system complexity. Three methods are presented that quantify aspects of the complexity of the robot and the pattern of lines it follows. The complexity measures provide a way to compare existing self- replicating robot systems and to evaluate new designs. Robotic self- replication is an aspect of automated assembly that has not been studied extensively in hardware, and this work (which was the outcome of a project in a mechatronics course at JHU) is one step in a larger effort to quantify and demonstrate various aspects of this research area.

  • A macroscopic view of self-replication

    In 1953, Crick and Watson published their landmark paper revealing the detailed structure of the DNA double helix. Several years earlier, von Neumann embedded a very complex configuration, a universal interpreter-copier, into a cellular array. Astoundingly, the structure of this configuration, able to realize the self-replication of any computing machine, including a universal Turing machine, shares several common traits with the structure of living cells as defined by Crick and Watson's discovery. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of von Neumann's birth, this paper presents a macroscopic analysis of self-replication in computing machines using three examples. After describing self-replication in von Neumann's universal interpreter-copier, we will revisit the famous self-replicating loop designed by Langton in 1984. In order to overcome some of the major drawbacks of Langton's loop, namely, its lack of functionality and the fact that it is ill-adapted for a realization in electronic circuits, we present a novel self-replicating loop, the Tom Thumb loop. Endowed with the same capabilities as von Neumann's interpreter-copier, i.e., the possibility of replicating computing machines of any complexity, our loop is moreover specifically designed for the implementation of self- replicating structures in programmable digital logic.

  • The machine to end all machines — Towards self-replicating machines on the moon

    We present the notion of a self-replicating machine for deployment on the Moon to leverage space colonization by exploiting its resources. The utility of self-replication cannot be understated - it offers the means to create an exponentially increasing general productive capacity on the Moon unconstrained by launch costs. Initially, we review the idea of physical self-replicating machines, emphasizing the universal constructor. The key to the universal construction mechanism necessary to realise self-replication is, we hypothesise, 3D printing. To date, 3D printing has been demonstrating its versatility in manufacturing structures, albeit of great sophistication. We briefly review 3D printing methods to date and suggest that fused deposition modeling and electron beam additive manufacturing offer a complete 3D printing capability suitable for deployment on the Moon. In our pursuit of a self- replicating machine, we have been working on 3D printing mechatronic components - electric motors, and to a lesser extent, electronics - as necessary steps to realizing 3D printing entire robotic machines in general (universal constructor) and 3D printers in particular (self-replicating machine). This 3D printer is essentially a core part of the payload for a rover vehicle which scours the lunar environment for the basic materials required for its own construction.

  • Studying Long-term Evolution with Artificial Life

    This paper describes an artificial ecology system populated by self- replicating machines, which is able to capture many of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics observed in real ecosystems, from the fractal nature of taxonomic and phylogenetic trees to the pattern of originations and extinctions in long-term evolution. The self-replicating machines are composed by elementary particles. The composition and behaviour of a self-replicating machine is determined by its genetic code, and new species arises by means of random mutations. The resulting dynamics is characterised by the co-evolution of species competing for resources. The interplay between the species and environment plays a crucial role for self-regulation: extinctions and originations are mechanisms used by the ecosystem to maintain the dynamical equilibrium that is favourable to life itself.



Standards related to Self-replicating Machines

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