Conferences related to Biomedical imaging

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2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI)

The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging.ISBI 2019 will be the 16th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2019 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2020 IEEE 17th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2020)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2020 will be the 17th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2020 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering cross-fertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2018 IEEE 15th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2018)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2018 will be the 15th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2018 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2017)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2017 will be the 14th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2017 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2016)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forumfor the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2016 willbe the thirteenth meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitatinginteraction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2016 meeting will continue thistradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrativeapproach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2015 IEEE 12th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2015)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2015 will be the 12th meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2014)

    The IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances in theoretical and applied biomedical imaging. ISBI 2014 will be the eleventh meeting in this series. The previous meetings have played a leading role in facilitating interaction between researchers in medical and biological imaging. The 2014 meeting will continue this tradition of fostering crossfertilization among different imaging communities and contributing to an integrative approach to biomedical imaging across all scales of observation.

  • 2013 IEEE 10th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2013)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2012 IEEE 9th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2012)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2011 IEEE 8th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2011)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2010 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2010)

    To serve the biological, biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and other technical communities through a quality program of presentations and papers on the foundation, application, development, and use of biomedical imaging.

  • 2009 IEEE 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2009)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2008 IEEE 5th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI 2008)

    Algorithmic, mathematical and computational aspects of biomedical imaging, from nano- to macroscale. Topics of interest include image formation and reconstruction, computational and statistical image processing and analysis, dynamic imaging, visualization, image quality assessment, and physical, biological and statistical modeling. Molecular, cellular, anatomical and functional imaging modalities and applications.

  • 2007 IEEE 4th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2007)

  • 2006 IEEE 3rd International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2006)

  • 2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2004)

  • 2002 1st IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: Macro to Nano (ISBI 2002)


2019 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2019, the 26th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2019 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting

The conference is intended to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on state-of-the-art research in antennas, propagation, electromagnetics, and radio science.


2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

The conference covers all aspects of the technology associated with ultrasound generation and detection and their applications.


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Periodicals related to Biomedical imaging

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


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Most published Xplore authors for Biomedical imaging

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Xplore Articles related to Biomedical imaging

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INVERSE BIOMEDICAL IMAGING USING SEPARATELY ADAPTED MESHES FOR PARAMETERS AND FORWARD MODEL VARIABLES

2007 4th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, 2007

Many important existing and upcoming biomedical imaging modalities lead to nonlinear relationships between state variables from which measurements result and the tissue properties one would like to reconstruct, and typically involve partial differential equations. For such cases, exact reconstruction formulas are rarely known and their solution requires numerical techniques such as the finite element method that approximates all involved variables ...


Millimeter-wave/terahertz chips for high-speed communication and biomedical imaging

2015 Asia-Pacific Microwave Conference (APMC), 2015

Millimeter-wave (mmWave) and terahertz (THz) technologies have been showing their great potentials for Gbps high-speed communication and biomedical imaging. This paper briefly reviews part of our research advances in these topics, especially in antenna and integrated circuit (IC) chips. Following that, this paper also preliminarily discusses the component related challenging issues and possible approaches for Gbps communication as well as ...


Key challenges for ASIC design and implementation for biomedical imaging

Proceedings of the 2009 12th International Symposium on Integrated Circuits, 2009

The distinctive challenges for design of read-out ASICs for radiation detectors in biomedical applications originate from the need to be interfaced to detectors with high density of pixels and process photons with high rates. Those two dominant factors impose a range of conflicting restrictions and demands on the design of the readout integrated circuits (ROIC). Some of the key challenges ...


Review of Compressed Sensing for Biomedical Imaging

2015 7th International Conference on Information Technology in Medicine and Education (ITME), 2015

Compressed sensing (CS) aims to reconstruct signals and images from significantly fewer measurements than were traditionally thought necessary. In this paper, we propose a review of CS in biomedical imaging applications, along with a review of recent applications in the biomedical imaging field. The aim is to provide an analysis of the current trends in CS, focusing on the advantages ...


Biomedical imaging ecosystem and the role of the GPU

2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, 2009

The biomedical imaging chain is continuously being challenged to reconstruct, analyze, and visualize increasing amounts of data in shorter amounts of time. Parallel computing on multi-core devices and clustered computers has allowed for continued innovation of compute and processing technologies but not without facing serious constraints of cost, space, and power consumption. Over the last three years the graphics processing ...


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Educational Resources on Biomedical imaging

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • INVERSE BIOMEDICAL IMAGING USING SEPARATELY ADAPTED MESHES FOR PARAMETERS AND FORWARD MODEL VARIABLES

    Many important existing and upcoming biomedical imaging modalities lead to nonlinear relationships between state variables from which measurements result and the tissue properties one would like to reconstruct, and typically involve partial differential equations. For such cases, exact reconstruction formulas are rarely known and their solution requires numerical techniques such as the finite element method that approximates all involved variables on a mesh. Traditionally, the same mesh is used for all involved variables. In this contribution, we argue that this is inappropriate and meshes should be chosen independently of each other for the various variables involved. We support this claim through a numerical experiment

  • Millimeter-wave/terahertz chips for high-speed communication and biomedical imaging

    Millimeter-wave (mmWave) and terahertz (THz) technologies have been showing their great potentials for Gbps high-speed communication and biomedical imaging. This paper briefly reviews part of our research advances in these topics, especially in antenna and integrated circuit (IC) chips. Following that, this paper also preliminarily discusses the component related challenging issues and possible approaches for Gbps communication as well as biomedical imaging.

  • Key challenges for ASIC design and implementation for biomedical imaging

    The distinctive challenges for design of read-out ASICs for radiation detectors in biomedical applications originate from the need to be interfaced to detectors with high density of pixels and process photons with high rates. Those two dominant factors impose a range of conflicting restrictions and demands on the design of the readout integrated circuits (ROIC). Some of the key challenges are: limited silicon real estate available per pixel, wide band analog electronics, high digital processing speed and integration with the rest of the system. The read-out electronics for radiation detectors reported in the literature can be classified into four groups regarding the technology and complexity. While the overall complexity increases, the complexity of individual channels is trimmed down as much as possible to accommodate larger number of channels into a limited silicon area. Part of our current work at Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science (MCSS) is the reduction in the likelihood of photons pile-ups and making their detection less erroneous. The pile-up is defined as overlapping of photons that cannot be discriminated. The work is also focused on options for improving output pulse shaping, as a factor relevant for noise reduction and pile-up discrimination.

  • Review of Compressed Sensing for Biomedical Imaging

    Compressed sensing (CS) aims to reconstruct signals and images from significantly fewer measurements than were traditionally thought necessary. In this paper, we propose a review of CS in biomedical imaging applications, along with a review of recent applications in the biomedical imaging field. The aim is to provide an analysis of the current trends in CS, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages in compressing biomedical imaging. One of the critical issue that used to hinder the application of compressed sensing in a biomedical imaging context is the computational cost of the underlying image reconstruction process. Furthermore, CS is compared to state-of-the-art compression algorithms in computed tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as examples of typical biomedical imaging. The main technical challenges associated with CS are discussed along with the predicted future trends.

  • Biomedical imaging ecosystem and the role of the GPU

    The biomedical imaging chain is continuously being challenged to reconstruct, analyze, and visualize increasing amounts of data in shorter amounts of time. Parallel computing on multi-core devices and clustered computers has allowed for continued innovation of compute and processing technologies but not without facing serious constraints of cost, space, and power consumption. Over the last three years the graphics processing unit (GPU) and its increased programmability has played an integral role in defining a new dimension to parallel computing with its single chip, many-core architecture as well as evolving the graphics pipeline to enhance visualization techniques. Image reconstruction, segmentation and registration algorithms architected to take advantage of the GPU parallel architecture not only realize massive processing speedups but also set the stage for scalability. High resolution rendering of 3D and 4D datasets are navigated in interactive, real-time approaches. Real time ray tracing and 3D stereoscopic solutions bring increased realism to images. Understanding the optimized mix of GPU and CPU, both in the sense of hardware and software, is necessary for imaging applications to innovate, realize cost/performance efficiency and continue to enhance visualization. Several approaches for GPU programmability are available and will be explored. Innovations in the compute, graphics and visualization space will be discussed to show the relevance of the GPU throughout the imaging chain.

  • Parametric study of a water-filled double-ridged horn antenna for biomedical imaging application

    The design of a miniaturized double-ridged horn antenna for use as an array element in the Subsurface Radar (SR) system is presented. The array antenna system will be arranged in a cylindrical scanning geometry which will host 72 antennas in a row for illuminating the target and receiving scattered signal. The scanning system will have several rows of antennas for better sensitivity and spatial accuracy. The antenna element of the array has several critical parameters, which influences the antenna performance. Other system parameters are antenna spacing, their angular positions and distances from each other. Based on the parametric studies, two prototypes were fabricated and tested to determine their suitability in the proposed imaging application.

  • A novel differential inverse scattering methodology in biomedical imaging

    An alternative differential framework for the existing integral-based electromagnetic inverse problems is proposed. This differential form, supplemented by the corresponding boundary conditions, overcomes the existing limitations of the integral-based inverse problems, i.e. considering the imaging antennas as point sources, the essential homogeneity along one axis, and the necessity of using a background matching medium. These limitations result in reconstructing two-dimensional images with certain level of error, and the practical problems associated with selecting suitable dielectric properties of the background medium. Thus, the ability of the proposed technique in reconstructing accurate three-dimensional images, including the dimensions and real structure of the imaging antennas and avoiding the essential use of matching medium, are unique advancements in solving inverse electromagnetic problems. To validate this proposed novel method, a biomedical inverse electromagnetic problem in head imaging is successfully solved.

  • Large-range large-aperture MEMS micromirrors for biomedical imaging applications

    Micromirrors with large scan ranges, large aperture sizes, fast speeds, low voltages and low cost are needed for optical switching, displays and biomedical imaging, but it is very challenging to simultaneously meet all the requirements. This paper introduces electrothermal bimorph based micromirrors that can overcome the challenge. For example, a large-vertical-displacement (LVD) micromirror scans 0.7 mm vertically at less than 25 Vdc. A lateral- shift-free (LSF) LVD generates a piston motion of 0.6 mm and scans more than 30° about two axes at less than 8 Vdc. An inverted-series-connected (ISC) micromirror scans ±30° about two axes with no rotation axis shifts. All these mirrors have an optical aperture of 1 mm. Their resonant frequencies range from 300 Hz to 2 kHz. Some of these micromirrors have been applied in biomedical imaging applications.

  • Bowtie Antenna TRM Design for Biomedical Imaging Using Electromagnetic Time Reversal Technique

    Microwave based imaging has been extensively examined for biomedical imaging and research is still ongoing to attain best imaging systems. Examination and detection of dielectric property differences of biological tissues has been examined over a wide range of frequencies for such applications. This paper looks at the design of a wide dual band Bowtie time reversal mirror (TRM) for biomedical imaging using electromagnetic time reversal technique resonating at 2.45 GHz and 5.2 GHz.

  • Low-cost microwave biomedical imaging

    Microwave biomedical imaging has the potential to be a future complementary diagnostic technique for cost-critical situations. The accessibility and portability of diagnostic imaging can mean accurate information is available where it is needed. The feasibility of microwave imaging has been demonstrated by using lab equipment such as vector network analyzers, which, whilst they are accurate, they are also large and expensive. Capturing the required signal responses can instead be performed by using software defined radio (SDR) technology, which due to its high manufacturing volumes can have a cost which is several orders of magnitude lower than a VNA. Although the performance of such a system might be lower than that of a full-sized VNA, the performance is still adequate for biomedical imaging applications. In this paper, an SDR- based system's performance is analyzed and shown to accurately detect an abnormality within a head phantom.




Jobs related to Biomedical imaging

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