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Xplore Articles related to Scrum (software Development)

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Trustworthy scrum: Development of secure software with scrum

2017 International Conference on Computer Science and Engineering (UBMK), 2017

Software development process models focus on ordering and combination of phases to develop the intended software product within time and cost estimates. However, commonness of software vulnerabilities in the fielded systems show that there is a need for more stringent software development process that focuses on improved security demands. Meanwhile, there are some reports that demonstrate the efficiency of existing ...


Modeling the Dynamics of an Agile Scrum Team in the Development of a Single Software Project

2018 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM), 2018

In software development, Agile Scrum is practiced with the intention of increasing the developers' productivity, and improving the quality of their output [3]. However, difficulties persist which prevent development teams' from reaping the full benefit of practicing Agile. From a review of case studies of Agile applications,it was observed that developers' ceased to practice Agile methods in aspects that related ...


Scaling Agile Scrum Software Development: Providing Agility and Quality to Platform Development by Reducing Time to Market

2016 IEEE 11th International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE), 2016

Agile software development approach aims at overcoming the limitations of plan-driven software development by allowing requirement changes during all phases of product development and providing agility to organization to respond to changing market needs. Software organizations have successfully implemented agile scrum in distributed software development. However, they also encountered many challenges while implementation which led to considerable amount of effort ...


Targeted Scrum: Applying Mission Command to Agile Software Development

IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 2016

Software engineering and mission command are two separate but similar fields, as both are instances of complex problem solving in environments with ever changing requirements. Our research hypothesis is that modifications to agile software development based on inspirations from mission command can improve the software engineering process in terms of planning, prioritizing, and communication of software requirements and progress, as ...


Adopting Scrum as an Agile approach in distributed software development: A review of literature

2017 1st International Conference on Next Generation Computing Applications (NextComp), 2017

The concept of Agile software development has attracted substantial interests of organisations in achieving rapid and functional software development goals. This could be due to its features of concentrating more on delivering a working software rather than being presented with a bulk-load of documentation; rapid response to changes in requirements rather than following a prescribed plan; collaboration with customers rather ...


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Educational Resources on Scrum (software Development)

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Trustworthy scrum: Development of secure software with scrum

    Software development process models focus on ordering and combination of phases to develop the intended software product within time and cost estimates. However, commonness of software vulnerabilities in the fielded systems show that there is a need for more stringent software development process that focuses on improved security demands. Meanwhile, there are some reports that demonstrate the efficiency of existing security enhanced conventional processes and success of agile projects over conventional waterfall projects. Based on this finding and the demand for secure software, we propose a security enhanced Scrum model (Trustworthy Scrum) by taking advantages of both security activities and Scrum framework which has fast adaptation and iterative cycle. While enhancing Scrum with security activities, we try to retain agile and security disciplines by considering that conventional security approach conflicts with agile methodologies.

  • Modeling the Dynamics of an Agile Scrum Team in the Development of a Single Software Project

    In software development, Agile Scrum is practiced with the intention of increasing the developers' productivity, and improving the quality of their output [3]. However, difficulties persist which prevent development teams' from reaping the full benefit of practicing Agile. From a review of case studies of Agile applications,it was observed that developers' ceased to practice Agile methods in aspects that related to working in teams. In these aspects, they regressed to waterfall methods, in the sense that developers worked in functional silos with little communication as the project progressed. As an attempt to resolve this, the system dynamics framework was applied in analyzing the Agile case studies. This allowed for an assessment of the progression of the problem over time, as an outcome of feedback loops caused by developers reacting to the outcomes of their previous actions. From doing so, the quietly escalating problem of information being withheld between developers in a single project team was understood to be the primary cause of failure. The study concludes by recommending the importance of open communication between developers, and acknowledging work done beyond the teams plan.

  • Scaling Agile Scrum Software Development: Providing Agility and Quality to Platform Development by Reducing Time to Market

    Agile software development approach aims at overcoming the limitations of plan-driven software development by allowing requirement changes during all phases of product development and providing agility to organization to respond to changing market needs. Software organizations have successfully implemented agile scrum in distributed software development. However, they also encountered many challenges while implementation which led to considerable amount of effort spend just to manage work. Difficulties were primarily in the areas of communication, culture, different time zones, different level of domain know how across scrum teams, and knowledge management. In this practice paper, we will share practices and systems implemented, challenges encountered along with their countermeasures, and lessons learnt in successfully scaling the Agile Scrum development to 16 globally distributed scrum teams with 100+ team members, successfully delivering 2000+ user stories which required execution of 3000+ product test cases and 1000+ system test cases for verification and validation in a single version of platform release Providing Agility and Quality to Platform Development by Reducing Time to Market.

  • Targeted Scrum: Applying Mission Command to Agile Software Development

    Software engineering and mission command are two separate but similar fields, as both are instances of complex problem solving in environments with ever changing requirements. Our research hypothesis is that modifications to agile software development based on inspirations from mission command can improve the software engineering process in terms of planning, prioritizing, and communication of software requirements and progress, as well as improving the overall software product. Targeted Scrum is a modification of Traditional Scrum based on three inspirations from Mission Command: End State, Line of Effort, and Targeting. These inspirations have led to the introduction of the Product Design Meeting and modifications of some current Scrum meetings and artifacts. We tested our research hypothesis using a semester-long undergraduate level software engineering class. Students developed two software projects, one using Traditional Scrum and the other using Targeted Scrum. We then assessed how well both methodologies assisted the software development teams in planning and developing the software architecture, prioritizing requirements, and communicating progress. We also evaluated the software product produced by both methodologies. We found that Targeted Scrum did better in assisting the software development teams in the planning and prioritization of the requirements. However, Targeted Scrum had a negligible effect on improving the software development teams external and internal communications. Finally, Targeted Scrum did not have an impact on the product quality by the top performing and worst performing teams. Targeted Scrum did assist the product quality of the teams in the middle of the performance spectrum.

  • Adopting Scrum as an Agile approach in distributed software development: A review of literature

    The concept of Agile software development has attracted substantial interests of organisations in achieving rapid and functional software development goals. This could be due to its features of concentrating more on delivering a working software rather than being presented with a bulk-load of documentation; rapid response to changes in requirements rather than following a prescribed plan; collaboration with customers rather than negotiation of contracts and giving more preference to individuals and interactions over processes and tools. Over the years, Agile approach (AA) has been perceived to be incompatible with distributed software development. However, recent studies have shown that Scrum, one of the popular Agile approaches, has been adopted and customized by organisations in alignment with distributed software development projects. This study presents the possibilities of adopting Scrum practices as an Agile approach in distributed software development projects based on different studies and reports that have been carried out in DSD projects using Scrum. Findings were presented from different studies showing Scrum being adopted successfully in DSD. The paper also investigated different ways in which these Scrum practices have been successfully adopted, thereby examining innovative approaches to Scrum practices, such as daily Scrum meetings, sprints, Scrum-of-Scrum and backlogs.

  • TWINS - This Workflow Is Not Scrum: Agile Process Adaptation for Open Source Software Projects

    It is becoming commonplace for companies to contribute to open source software (OSS) projects. At the same time, many software organizations are applying Scrum software development practices, for productivity and quality gains. Scrum calls for self-organizing teams, in which the development team has total control over its development process. However, OSS projects typically have their own processes and standards, which might not mesh well with a company's internal processes, such as Scrum. This paper presents an experience report from Sony Interactive Entertainment (SIE), where the "toolchain CPU compiler" team directly participates in the "LLVM" OSS project. The team ran into a number of difficulties when using Scrum to manage their development. In particular, the team often failed to complete Scrum sprints where tasks required interaction with the open source community. We look at how the team redefined task flows to alleviate these difficulties, and eventually evolved a highly modified process, dubbed TWINS (This Workflow Is Not Scrum). We assess the revised process, and compare it to other established agile methods, finding it bears a strong resemblance to Scrumban (the SIE team was not aware of Scrumban previously). The TWINS framework presented here may help other organizations who develop software in-house and engage in OSS projects, to gain the best of both worlds.

  • What Do We Know about Agile Software Development?

    Agile software development has had a huge impact on how software is developed worldwide. We can view agile methods such as Extreme Programming (XP) and Scrum as a reaction to plan-based or traditional methods, which emphasize a "rationalized, engineering-based approach, incorporating extensive planning, codified processes, and rigorous reuse. In contrast, agile methods address the challenge of an unpredictable world, emphasizing the value competent people and their relationships bring to software development. To clarify the effectiveness of agile methods, we reviewed the agile development literature and conducted a systematic study of what we know empirically about its benefits and limitations.

  • A framework to apply ISO/IEC29110 on SCRUM

    During the recent years, small software companies have shown interests to use software development standards to improving their processes and competitiveness. Yet, this can be inconvenient for companies who have no experience in standard or Software Process Improvement (SPI). ISO/IEC29110 is a lightweight software development standard including Project management and Software implementation process. Agile and SCRUM is the most selected software development methodology by small software companies. This work focuses on explaining the relationships between agile practices and a Software Implementation process defined by ISO/IEC29110 version 2011. The main purpose of the study is to exhibit the potential application of this standard to SCRUM software development. The results of this study highlight practical frameworks on each Software Implementation activities as well as indicate the required inputs, outputs, mechanisms, and constraints.

  • Poster: An Empirical Study of the Product Owner Role in Scrum

    The Product Owner (PO) is critical for translating business needs into a software implementation by gathering and prioritizing requirements, and assessing whether features have met the definition of "done." There is a paucity of detail about how POs achieve this daunting task in practice with potential negative consequences for project success. In this research we employed a mixed-method approach comprising two case studies in which we interviewed and observed 55 practitioners across 9 large multi-national companies and an SME. Using a cross-case analysis we identified twelve distinct Product Owner activities. From our empirical findings we created a Product Owner role taxonomy and found eight generic activities common to all teams, projects and companies regardless of project size.

  • Gamified SCRUM Design in Software Development Projects

    From year to year, the software development method has been changing from traditional method to Agile approach which has quite complicated and tricky way. SCRUM is one of example agile contain iteration called sprint which describes phasing running on the timeline of the project and by sprint planning the SCRUM master (as a leader) can direct the team to finish on a date. The motivation for SCRUM team member will influence the result, so in this research, we try to design a gamified method into SCRUM. We make a prototype design about gamification in SCRUM development and also spread a questionnaire to the respondent already have experience with SCRUM development. The result shows that people motivation will increase when they feel appreciated, rewarded and the atmosphere of the competition was made well supporting the team's performance.



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