IEEE Organizations related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

No organizations are currently tagged "Wireless Fidelity"



Conferences related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

No conferences are currently tagged "Wireless Fidelity"


Periodicals related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

No periodicals are currently tagged "Wireless Fidelity"


Most published Xplore authors for Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

Introduction

Indoor Wireless Communications: From Theory to Implementation, None

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book aims at presenting methods and techniques of how in‐building coverage can be enhanced relative to that provided by the existing (predominantly macrocell‐based) networks at predominantly a technical level but including also some commercial level detail. New technologies do provide opportunities to ...


Small Cells for 5G Mobile Networks

Fundamentals of 5G Mobile Networks, None

The evolution of wireless communication systems is now characterised by the tremendous growth of mobile data traffic and the number of connected devices. In response to the unprecedented levels of demand, cellular networks are undergoing a major shift in their deployment and optimisation. New infrastructure elements, such as femto/pico base stations, fixed/mobile relays, cognitive radios, and distributed antennas are being ...


Toward Practical Deployment of Fingerprint-Based Indoor Localization

IEEE Pervasive Computing, 2017

This article addresses several challenges for practical deployment of Wi-Fi fingerprinting localization. First, the signals of virtual access points (VAPs) from the same physical access point have high correlation, and hence should be filtered for computational efficiency. Second, because heterogeneous devices might report the same signal differently, their readings must be calibrated appropriately. Finally, to provide a better user experience, ...


Visible Light‐Based Communication and Localization

Handbook of Position Location: Theory, Practice, and Advances, None

Light‐emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly being embedded in different commonly used devices. Because LED‐based light sources are widely available, there are several options for visible light communication and positioning systems. This chapter provides an overview of the technologies that have paved the way for visible light communication and positioning systems. It focus on visible light positioning (VLP) systems using information ...


Dynamic Enforcement of Security Policies in IP/MPLS Environments

Service Automation and Dynamic Provisioning Techniques in IP / MPLS Environments, None

This chapter contains sections titled:Enforcing Security Policies for Web‐based Access ControlEnforcing Security Policies in Companies with 802.1XReferences


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Introduction

    This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book aims at presenting methods and techniques of how in‐building coverage can be enhanced relative to that provided by the existing (predominantly macrocell‐based) networks at predominantly a technical level but including also some commercial level detail. New technologies do provide opportunities to significantly reduce the cost of provision, but significant work remains to encourage widespread roll‐out of these technologies, including consumer understanding, commercial incentives and regulatory clarity. The book reviews some of these issues, illustrating some concepts with case studies to make understanding much easier. It presents in a simple and complete way the physics of radio propagation inside buildings as well as methods to design and plan indoor networks, considering various technologies and a handful of mathematical models to use.

  • Small Cells for 5G Mobile Networks

    The evolution of wireless communication systems is now characterised by the tremendous growth of mobile data traffic and the number of connected devices. In response to the unprecedented levels of demand, cellular networks are undergoing a major shift in their deployment and optimisation. New infrastructure elements, such as femto/pico base stations, fixed/mobile relays, cognitive radios, and distributed antennas are being massively deployed, paving the way for the next generation of cellular systems and networks, which will be more efficient in terms of spectrum use, multi‐RAT support and energy efficiency, and will use high‐order multi‐RAT support techniques together with massive deployments of small cells for higher re‐use. As a consequence, new 5G cellular deployments could be characterised by a more unplanned, irregular and random location of access nodes, whose positions may vary widely over a very large area. As a result, the interference scenarios will be more complex, thus making evaluation and design of different enabling communication technologies and protocols more challenging. In this emerging Heterogeneous Networking environment, small cells will play a fundamental role towards the successful deployment of 5th Generation systems. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the key drivers for small‐cell deployment, and show how densification through advanced MIMO technology and small cells can complement each other to satisfy the projected traffic demand. However, since forecasts of mobile data traffic seem to be continuously on the rise, it will become necessary to move into the mmWave bands where sufficiently large swathes of spectrum are available.

  • Toward Practical Deployment of Fingerprint-Based Indoor Localization

    This article addresses several challenges for practical deployment of Wi-Fi fingerprinting localization. First, the signals of virtual access points (VAPs) from the same physical access point have high correlation, and hence should be filtered for computational efficiency. Second, because heterogeneous devices might report the same signal differently, their readings must be calibrated appropriately. Finally, to provide a better user experience, it's necessary to properly estimate the localization error. To overcome these challenges, the authors present three plug-ins for existing localization systems. They merge VAPs using a clique-finding algorithm, propose a crowdsourced approach to accommodate new devices, and derive the region where the target might be located. Extensive experimental trials in indoor sites support the practicality and effectiveness of the solutions.

  • Visible Light‐Based Communication and Localization

    Light‐emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly being embedded in different commonly used devices. Because LED‐based light sources are widely available, there are several options for visible light communication and positioning systems. This chapter provides an overview of the technologies that have paved the way for visible light communication and positioning systems. It focus on visible light positioning (VLP) systems using information arriving at light detectors from specific light sources and also on how the arrangements of different light detectors can improve VLP system accuracy and usability. VLP systems may use the identity of light anchors, fingerprinting methods, ranging for trilateration, and other methods based on image sensors and computer vision to provide a position fix. The chapter discusses some of the pros and cons of these techniques for VLP. It presents a geometrical analysis only for the image‐sensor based VLP systems.

  • Dynamic Enforcement of Security Policies in IP/MPLS Environments

    This chapter contains sections titled:Enforcing Security Policies for Web‐based Access ControlEnforcing Security Policies in Companies with 802.1XReferences

  • Wireless LANs

    This chapter contains sections titled:IntroductionApplications of WLANsWLAN Compared to CellularHow WLANs WorkPerformance of WLANsWLAN Network CoverageImproving WLANsSecurityRoamingQuality of Service (QoS)Handover and PagingBattery LifeGo Faster WLAN – 802.11nInterferenceFuture of WLANsReferencesMore to Explore

  • RF Equipment and Distribution Systems

    A comparison of the different types of distribution systems is made in this chapter and recommendations as to which to choose in different situations are also made. The costs and performance of the indoor system will depend critically on making the choice; therefore it is important to have a clear understanding of this before attempting to optimize any indoor system. The chapter discusses the main characteristics of the RF equipment and components used in such distribution systems. Base stations are the transmitting element in many indoor wireless networks. Site acquisition is the procedure that needs to be completed in order to deploy a new cellular base station at a certain location. Active devices are widely used nowadays for many indoor wireless deployments. Two of the most relevant ones are cellular and Wi‐Fi. The chapter gives a brief description of key active components.

  • Capacity Planning and Dimensioning

    This chapter aims at giving an overview for capacity dimensioning for voice and data traffic and planning for any indoor wireless technology. Capacity dimensioning and spectrum requirements calculation is an essential part of any in‐building wireless network, especially to determine the necessary spectrum resources required to provide sufficient QoS for the distinct services and applications that nowadays wireless networks offer. In the design of a circuit‐switched network for capacity there are various parameters that should be used. The chapter describes these parameters. These parameters apply for voice traffic only and cannot be used for data traffic. Radio resource management (RRM) deals with multiuser and multicell network capacity issues, to achieve maximum capacity when several users and adjacent base stations share the same frequency channel. These capacity enhancements can supersede those provided by advanced source and channel coding schemes, in particular using dynamic RRM strategies.

  • WiFi: IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN

    This chapter discusses the technology evolution of IEEE 802.11, more popularly known as WiFi. It describes the MAC layer and the physical layer, which have some unique features when compared to cellular systems. The MAC layer consists of two major functional entities: the MAC sublayer and the MAC layer management entity (MLME). The core functions of channel access, retransmissions, packet fragmentation and encryption are handled by the MAC sublayer. The MLME handles higher MAC functions such as synchronization, power management, and connection management, which include association and authentication. The chapter talks about some of these functions. It explains in detail the physical‐layer enhancements, as well as MAC enhancements. The widespread proliferation of WiFi networks has given rise to an entire industry catering to the design, control, operation, and management of networks with tens to hundreds of access points (APs).

  • 5G‐WLAN Security

    This chapter briefly describes the security considerations of WiFi and LiFi network interconnections with 5G Networks. When designing 5G networks with short range WiFi and LiFi connectivity, architectural considerations must be accompanied with respective security considerations, and such security considerations are expected to influence the architectural decisions. This chapter proposes a security‐based architectural model for short range wireless networks (WiFi) and high‐speed backbone wireless networks (5G networks). In addition, this chapter explains the security considerations of the LiFi interconnection with 5G networks.



Standards related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Wireless Fidelity"


Jobs related to Wireless Fidelity

Back to Top