IEEE Organizations related to Commercialization

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Conferences related to Commercialization

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2021 IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems (FUZZ-IEEE)

FUZZ-IEEE 2021 will represent a unique meeting point for scientists and engineers, both from academia and industry, to interact and discuss the latest enhancements and innovations in the field. The topics of the conference will cover all the aspects of theory and applications of fuzzy sets, fuzzy logic and associated approaches (e.g. aggregation operators such as the Fuzzy Integral), as well as their hybridizations with other artificial and computational intelligence techniques.


2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2020 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)

The Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference is a major international conference focusing on educational innovations and research in engineering and computing education. FIE 2019 continues a long tradition of disseminating results in engineering and computing education. It is an ideal forum for sharing ideas, learning about developments and interacting with colleagues inthese fields.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM)

All topics related to engineering and technology management, including applicable analytical methods and economical/social/human issues to be considered in making engineering decisions.


2020 IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Promote science and engineering of photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and applications


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Periodicals related to Commercialization

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Xplore Articles related to Commercialization

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The challenges of bottom-up innovation

IEEE Engineering Management Review, 2013

Volume 41, Number 3 of the Engineering Management Review included my comments on Top-Down Innovation (TDI) and Bottom-Up Innovation (BUI). I drew the distinctions between the two approaches to innovation and noted that in most organizations BUI eventually becomes TDI. Not too many organizations provide a supportive environment that fosters BUI. The appropriate environment requires 1) organizational freedom that supports ...


The innovation prevention department

IEEE Engineering Management Review, 2016

EVERY organization includes the innovation prevention department; it may or may not be visible, but it exists. It may include the CEO and upper level executives; managers from all the functional groups and at all levels; and the continuum from the new recruit to the technology professionals with years of technical contributions. Past innovators may also be in this group ...


Commercializing federal technology

COMPCON Spring '91 Digest of Papers, 1991

Government actions that have improved the private sector's ability to develop the commercial implications of federally funded R&D; in the last ten years are discussed. Particular attention is given to the role played by the US Department of Commerce in bringing about these improvements.<>


Roles for industry and government in EV commercialization

30th IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference, 1980

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Innovation: Feasibility

IEEE Engineering Management Review, 2016

In Volume 44.2, the author discussed the Idea to Concept Stage of product innovation that included transitioning a raw-idea into a working-idea and framing the working-idea by answering the questions related to the what, why, and how of the proposed idea. Let's now examine some of the elements involved in developing the feasibility of the framed idea.


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Educational Resources on Commercialization

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The challenges of bottom-up innovation

    Volume 41, Number 3 of the Engineering Management Review included my comments on Top-Down Innovation (TDI) and Bottom-Up Innovation (BUI). I drew the distinctions between the two approaches to innovation and noted that in most organizations BUI eventually becomes TDI. Not too many organizations provide a supportive environment that fosters BUI. The appropriate environment requires 1) organizational freedom that supports risk-taking, and 2) people willing to accept the risks; both are essential. BUI cannot function when the organization fails to offer freedom with discipline; discipline meaning that innovation requires thinking and doing and not just thinking; it's not sufficient to just think and generate ideas. Innovation crosscuts the entire organization; it requires the integration of all organizational functions to be successful. Keep in mind that: INNOVATION = INVENTION + COMMERCIALIZATION OR IMPLEMENTATION. No commercialization or implementation, no innovation.

  • The innovation prevention department

    EVERY organization includes the innovation prevention department; it may or may not be visible, but it exists. It may include the CEO and upper level executives; managers from all the functional groups and at all levels; and the continuum from the new recruit to the technology professionals with years of technical contributions. Past innovators may also be in this group of naysayers. This innovation prevention department also includes a group of innovation killers; the organization's everyday practices and policies that govern performance.

  • Commercializing federal technology

    Government actions that have improved the private sector's ability to develop the commercial implications of federally funded R&D; in the last ten years are discussed. Particular attention is given to the role played by the US Department of Commerce in bringing about these improvements.<>

  • Roles for industry and government in EV commercialization

    None

  • Innovation: Feasibility

    In Volume 44.2, the author discussed the Idea to Concept Stage of product innovation that included transitioning a raw-idea into a working-idea and framing the working-idea by answering the questions related to the what, why, and how of the proposed idea. Let's now examine some of the elements involved in developing the feasibility of the framed idea.

  • Social Internet of Things: Existing Platforms

    In this course, the most relevant commercial and research platforms, which envision objects with "social" attributes, are presented, analyzed, and compared. More specifically, terms of comparison taken into account are the level of autonomy of the objects, the openness of the platforms to third party applications, the existence of an evident market exploitation visions. Then, the focus will be put on the advantages that such platforms bring (such as network navigability and differentiated trustworthiness levels) as well as the new networking services that they enable. Topics addressed include: Research platforms; Commercial platforms; Analysis and comparison; Network structure and navigability; Trustworthiness management; and Novel networking primitives.

  • The idea: The critical issue in the innovation process

    Often, when meeting with small groups of managers and senior engineers, I've been asked: How do innovators come up with ideas that are worth pursuing? Good question, but no definitive or simple answers. So, here are few points to consider. Keep in mind that Innovation involves invention plus commercialization or implementation; no commercialization or implementation, no innovation. Innovation requires invention (something new) and invention begins with the idea.

  • Innovation: transition from bottom-up to top-down innovation

    IN the last issue, I discussed the issues involved in Bottom-Up Innovation (BUI). BUI is just as the term implies; innovation that originates anyplace by anyone in the depths of the organization; it requires an organizational culture that allows freedom, but also with business discipline. Bottom-Up innovators include those few constructive mavericks who have the courage and the physical and emotional resources to take a concept, that may not be particularly acceptable to the status quo or impact a current profitable product line negatively, and demonstrate some level of feasibility. BUI allows organizations to replace the idea box with those few people who will dedicate their personal time, effort, and knowledge to prove a point that will be denigrated by the naysayers.

  • Triangulating Research Dissemination Methods: A Three‐Pronged Approach to Closing the Research–Practice Divide

    In this chapter, we revisit our research into the current status of industry/academia collaboration, as introduced in theIEEE Computercolumn “Making Software Engineering Research Relevant” (S. Beecham, J. Noll, and I. Richardson (2014) Using agile practices to solve global software development problems – a case study. InMethods and Tools for Project/Architecture/Risk Management. Globally Distributed Software Development Projects PARIS Workshop (ICGSEW'14), co‐located with ICGSE, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, August 18–21, IEEE Computer Society.). The observation that practitioners rarely read the academic literature leads us to consider the wider question of whether academia cares enough about the practical relevance of their output to change their dissemination patterns.

  • New, clean, and electric: Commercialization of electric vehi

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Standards related to Commercialization

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Jobs related to Commercialization

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