IEEE Organizations related to Code Refractoring

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Conferences related to Code Refractoring

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Periodicals related to Code Refractoring

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Most published Xplore authors for Code Refractoring

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Xplore Articles related to Code Refractoring

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Refactoring Myths

IEEE Software, 2015

Refactoring myths are popular misconceptions about tool-based refactoring- about the tools' intent, the principle they follow, their robustness, and support for them. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.


Refactoring-a Shot in the Dark?

IEEE Software, 2015

A study performed semistructured interviews of 12 seasoned software architects and developers at nine Finnish companies. Its main goals were to find out how the practitioners viewed the role and importance of refactoring, and how and when they refactored. Another goal was to see whether shortened cycle times and, especially, continuous-deployment practices affected how and when refactoring was done. The ...


The Birth of Refactoring: A Retrospective on the Nature of High-Impact Software Engineering Research

IEEE Software, 2015

Software refactoring was independently invented in the late '80s by two students in two research groups: Ralph Johnson's group at the University of Illinois and David Notkin's group at the University of Washington. This article provides a retrospective of the birth of refactoring, reflecting on how the ideas came about and were developed in those two students' doctoral dissertations. The ...


Database Refactoring: Lessons from the Trenches

IEEE Software, 2015

Although database refactoring has been advocated as an important area of database development, little research has studied its implications. A small software development firm refactored a database related to an application that lets clients optimize their logistics processes. This project was based on the design of clear database development conventions and the need to package documentation in the database itself. ...


Challenges to and Solutions for Refactoring Adoption: An Industrial Perspective

IEEE Software, 2015

Refactoring is a key approach for managing technical debt. In the past few years, refactoring techniques and tools have received considerable attention from researchers and tool vendors. However, several practical challenges must be overcome to facilitate the adoption of refactoring in industrial contexts. Results from a survey at the Siemens Corporate Development Center India highlight common challenges to refactoring adoption. ...


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Educational Resources on Code Refractoring

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Refactoring Myths

    Refactoring myths are popular misconceptions about tool-based refactoring- about the tools' intent, the principle they follow, their robustness, and support for them. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Refactoring-a Shot in the Dark?

    A study performed semistructured interviews of 12 seasoned software architects and developers at nine Finnish companies. Its main goals were to find out how the practitioners viewed the role and importance of refactoring, and how and when they refactored. Another goal was to see whether shortened cycle times and, especially, continuous-deployment practices affected how and when refactoring was done. The results paint a multifaceted picture with some common patterns. The respondents considered refactoring to be valuable but had difficulty explaining and justifying it to management and customers. Refactoring often occurred in conjunction with the development of new features because it seemed to require a clear business need. The respondents didn't use measurements to quantify the need for or impact of refactoring. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • The Birth of Refactoring: A Retrospective on the Nature of High-Impact Software Engineering Research

    Software refactoring was independently invented in the late '80s by two students in two research groups: Ralph Johnson's group at the University of Illinois and David Notkin's group at the University of Washington. This article provides a retrospective of the birth of refactoring, reflecting on how the ideas came about and were developed in those two students' doctoral dissertations. The analysis provides useful insights for both researchers and practitioners seeking high impact in their work. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Database Refactoring: Lessons from the Trenches

    Although database refactoring has been advocated as an important area of database development, little research has studied its implications. A small software development firm refactored a database related to an application that lets clients optimize their logistics processes. This project was based on the design of clear database development conventions and the need to package documentation in the database itself. The experience led to five key lessons learned: refactoring should be automated whenever possible, the database catalog is crucial, refactoring is easier when it's done progressively, refactoring can help optimize an application and streamline its code base, and refactoring related to application development requires a complex skill set and must be applied sensibly. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Challenges to and Solutions for Refactoring Adoption: An Industrial Perspective

    Refactoring is a key approach for managing technical debt. In the past few years, refactoring techniques and tools have received considerable attention from researchers and tool vendors. However, several practical challenges must be overcome to facilitate the adoption of refactoring in industrial contexts. Results from a survey at the Siemens Corporate Development Center India highlight common challenges to refactoring adoption. The article also outlines ways to address these challenges and describes key initiatives the development center is planning and launching. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Refactoring for Asynchronous Execution on Mobile Devices

    To improve responsiveness, developers often use asynchronous programming. In the post-PC era, asynchronous programming is even more in demand because mobile and wearable devices have limited resources and access the network excessively. One current development task is refactoring long-running, blocking synchronous code (for example, accessing the Web, a cloud, a database, or a file system) into nonblocking asynchronous code. This article describes the refactorings that improve responsiveness, along with the obstacles of using asynchrony. It also discusses the challenges of retrofitting asynchrony and presents program analyses and transformations and a growing, practical toolset and resources for retrofitting asynchrony. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Refactoring Tools are Trustworthy Enough and Trust Must be Earned

    In his Point essay, "Refactoring Tools Are Trustworthy Enough," John Brant argues that refactoring tools that help developers work more efficiently is more important than tools that preserve behavior. In his Counterpoint essay, "Trust Must Be Earned," Friedrich Steimann argues that current refactoring tools are unreliable and that developers should give their best to create refactoring tools that are correct. This article is part of a special issue on Refactoring.

  • Refactoring [Guest editors' introduction]

    Refactoring changes a program's source code without changing its external behavior, typically to improve the software's design The articles selected for this issue range from historical, exploring refactoring research's origins, to practical, exploring software developers' experiences with refactoring, to theoretical, exploring new refactoring techniques that haven't yet appeared in the wild. The Web extra at https://youtu.be/f2IK3V9wwa8 is an audio recording of Davide Falessi speaking with guest editors Emerson Murphy-Hill of North Carolina State University, Don Roberts of the University of Evansville, and Peter Sommerlad of Fachhochschule Ostschweiz / Hochschule für Technik Rapperswil about past, present, and future approaches to refactoring.

  • Code Ownership Perspectives

    In the essay "Code Ownership-a Quality Issue," Sigrid Eldh argues for adapting code ownership to specific situations, focusing on quality, and taking into account ownership of the test code. In the essay "Code Ownership-More Complex to Understand Than Research Implies," Brendan Murphy argues for a broader and deeper analysis of code ownership.

  • Ignore, Refactor, or Rewrite

    Imagine that you have some code written, but it has problems. The problems are small enough that you could imagine rewriting the code completely, and you must choose what do. You could do nothing (ignore it), make incremental changes (refactor it), or write new code from scratch (rewrite it). How do you choose? What factors do you consider? There’s already a lot of guidance. In fact, the very existence of refactoring on the list of choices is special because the idea of refactoring code wasn’t well formed until the 1990s. When you refactor code, you make changes that improve its structure but do not change its visible behavior, and our tools are increasingly good at supporting refactoring, helping us make sweeping changes safely.



Standards related to Code Refractoring

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Jobs related to Code Refractoring

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