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Xplore Articles related to Volatile Organic Compounds

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The removal of volatile organic compounds from air by pulsed electron beams

12th International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams. BEAMS'98. Proceedings (Cat. No.98EX103), 1998

Many organic synthesis processes are accompanied by ventilation emissions of exhaust air contaminated with the vapor of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Recent investigations have shown the efficiency of using electron beams to remove the vapor of VOCs from exhaust air. The use of pulsed electron beams for these purposes has not been, adequately explored yet. The goal of the present ...


Solid catalysts for waste water treatment through liquid phase oxidation

Proceedings Third Russian-Korean International Symposium on Science and Technology. KORUS'99 (Cat. No.99EX362), 1999

None


Destruction of volatile organic compounds in air by a superimposed barrier discharge plasma reactor and activated carbon filter hybrid system

IAS '97. Conference Record of the 1997 IEEE Industry Applications Conference Thirty-Second IAS Annual Meeting, 1997

The superimposed barrier discharge and activated carbon filter hybrid systems are used to remove toluene and trichloro-ethylene (TCE) from air streams. The superimposed barrier discharge consists of silent and surface discharges. Experiments are conducted for the gas flow rate from 1 to 10 L/min., applied power from 0 to 7 W and toluene and TCE initial concentration from 0 to ...


Volatile organic compounds identification system using quartz crystal microbalances

Asian Conference on Sensors, 2003. AsiaSense 2003., 2003

None


Impact of Hot-Pressing Parameters and Climate Temperature on VOC Emission from Particleboard

2010 4th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2010

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from larch particleboard at different temperatures were studied in this paper. The small climate chamber and portable VOC gas monitor were used to measure VOCs quantities. Particleboard 1 (with hot-pressing time 3.5 min and hot-pressing pressure 35 MPa) and particleboard 2 (with hot-pressing time 2.7 min and hot-pressing pressure 30 MPa) were respectively examined at ...


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Educational Resources on Volatile Organic Compounds

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • The removal of volatile organic compounds from air by pulsed electron beams

    Many organic synthesis processes are accompanied by ventilation emissions of exhaust air contaminated with the vapor of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Recent investigations have shown the efficiency of using electron beams to remove the vapor of VOCs from exhaust air. The use of pulsed electron beams for these purposes has not been, adequately explored yet. The goal of the present work was to study the processes of removal of VOCs from the air by means of a 3-ns electron beam. Subjects of inquiry included acrolein, styrene and benzene, i.e., the most common toxic VOCs present in emissions by various enterprises, synthesizing organic compounds, producing plastic materials, etc.

  • Solid catalysts for waste water treatment through liquid phase oxidation

    None

  • Destruction of volatile organic compounds in air by a superimposed barrier discharge plasma reactor and activated carbon filter hybrid system

    The superimposed barrier discharge and activated carbon filter hybrid systems are used to remove toluene and trichloro-ethylene (TCE) from air streams. The superimposed barrier discharge consists of silent and surface discharges. Experiments are conducted for the gas flow rate from 1 to 10 L/min., applied power from 0 to 7 W and toluene and TCE initial concentration from 0 to 2,000 ppm for 60 Hz AC applied voltage conditions. Discharge byproducts are measured by FTIR, GC and TLV VOC detector. The results shows that: (1) toluene decomposition rate monotonically increases with increasing applied power; (2) approximately 90% of toluene is removed by plasma reactors alone and up to 98% is removed by hybrid systems; (3) TCE removal rate by hybrid system is 90% and up to 50% is removed by a discharge reactor alone; (4) the pressure drop of the reactor and carbon filter increase with increasing gas flow rate; (5) TCE decomposition to form CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O and Cl/sub 2/ and except CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O these discharge byproducts are absorbed in activated carbon filters; (6) no COCl/sub 2/, HCl, CO, NO/sub x/ and O/sub 3/ are observed in a discharge byproducts for the present range of experiments; and (7) the energy yield for toluene decompositions is up to 30 g/kWh, and up to 15 g/kWh for TCE decompositions.

  • Volatile organic compounds identification system using quartz crystal microbalances

    None

  • Impact of Hot-Pressing Parameters and Climate Temperature on VOC Emission from Particleboard

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from larch particleboard at different temperatures were studied in this paper. The small climate chamber and portable VOC gas monitor were used to measure VOCs quantities. Particleboard 1 (with hot-pressing time 3.5 min and hot-pressing pressure 35 MPa) and particleboard 2 (with hot-pressing time 2.7 min and hot-pressing pressure 30 MPa) were respectively examined at climate temperatures of 15, 23, 25, and 35°C. At a temperature of 23°C, particleboard 1 showed a higher initial emission than particleboard 2. VOC emissions from particleboards at 35°C were higher than ones at other temperatures. The emission study shows that hot-pressing parameters of particleboard and climate temperature have obvious effect on VOC emission. With the extension of hot-pressing time and the increase of hot-pressing pressure, VOC emissions increase. The increase of temperature can accelerate VOC emissions. On the other hand, temperature markedly affects the short-term emissions and it has less impact on the long- term emissions.

  • Removal of nitrobenzene and volatile organic compounds using electron radiation

    Experimental results concerning removal of nitrobenzene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as toluene, trichloroethylene and benzene with the use of low energy electron beam are presented. Lab scale apparatus for electron beam irradiation of water is briefly described. Total dose of /spl beta/ radiation was controlled by the time of water circulation (1-50 min.), accelerating voltage (V/sub a/=100-125 kV) and electron beam current (0.1-1 mA) for flow rate of 1 kg/min. The electron beam was generated in vacuum (p<10/sup -7/ Torr) produced by a system of diffusion-sorption-rotary pumps. Electrons were injected into the treated water through an electron beam permeable membrane made of boron nitride poly-crystalline ceramics with a thickness of 10 /spl mu/m. A low mass density (/spl sim/2 g/cm/sup 3/) of the ceramic material enables to obtain a high transmission of the electron beam even for a low accelerating voltage. Dependencies of the removed content of contaminants on the total dose of /spl beta/ radiation are presented. Despite using low energy electron beam, the results have indicated a significant removal of nitrobenzene and VOCs treated.

  • Dynamic variation of volatile organic compounds from the needles of Pinus sylvestnis var. mongolica Litv.

    Pre-concentrated system combined GC-MS was evaluated for determination of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) from Pinus sylvestnis var. mongolica Litv. using SUMMA canister for sampling. A total of 104 volatile compounds were identified. The main volatile components were (+)-2-caren (36.84%), Camphene (8.97%), beta.-Pinene (5.52%), (+)-Camphene (22.28%), Tricyclene(3.06%) in spring. Major volatiles identified included 2-chloro-1-Propene(34.31%), 1,1,3,3-tetrachloro-2-propanone(17.58%), D-Limonene(3.95%), caryophyllene(4.45%) in summer. The main volatile components were Sabinene(11.35%), beta.-Myrcene(4.01%), beta.-Pinene(6.88%), Camphene(9.05%), 3-Octen-5-yne,2,7-dimethyl-(E)-(59.19%) in autumn. It will be able to promote the development of the healthy human settlements and ecological city when P. sylvestnis var. mongolica was used appropriately.

  • Sensing characteristics of nano-network structure of polypyrrole for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) gases

    Nanowires of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) were synthesized by chemical polymerization methode. The 0.18 mol of pyrrole (Py) as monomer, 0.18 mol of dodecyl-benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) as dopant and 0.26 mol of anhydrous iron(lll) tri chloride (FeCl3) as oxidant were mixed and stirred in 200 ml of distilled water at 0degC. The reaction was carried out for three different times (6 h, 24 h, 40 h) and reaction rate was 200 rpm. The morphology of PPy was evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). It was found that the morphology of nanowire PPy was affected by reaction time and aggregation rate. When the polymerization time was getting longer, nanowire structure was appeared clearly. The sensitivities of nanowire PPy were investigated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  • Novel Optochemical Sensors Based on Hollow Fibers and Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    In this letter, the feasibility of using hollow-core optical fibers (HOFs) integrated with carbon nanotubes for volatile organic compound (VOC) detection applications has been investigated. The Langmuir-Blodgett technique has been used in order to transfer single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) onto HOFs. Reflectance characterization of the obtained sensing probes has been carried out in the range 1520-1620 nm. Finally, the sensing capability of the HOF sensors has been investigated by exposure in a test chamber to traces of tetrahydrofuran. The preliminary results obtained demonstrate the capability of the novel HOF sensor to perform chemical detection of VOCs showing a good sensitivity and fast response times

  • Linking OMI HCHO and MODIS PRI satellite data with BVOCS emissions in NE Spain

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play several important roles on tropospheric chemical composition. Biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) are the largest source of NMVOCs (non-methane VOCs), accounting for the release of up to 10% of total C fixed by plants in photosynthesis. As isoprene is often the dominant source of atmospheric formaldehyde (HCHO) detected using satellite sensors, it is often correlated directly to satellite HCHO observations without accounting for other HCHO sources. Here we investigate the importance of quantifying monoterpene emissions when linking remotely sensed HCHO vertical columns to terrestrial BVOCs emissions at four different ecosystems in NE Spain where monoterpene-isoprene emissions ratios are known to be unusually high. Average HCHO yield for present monoterpenes was approximately 29% compared to 45% for isoprene. Including monoterpene HCHO yield contributions in total atmospheric HCHO concentrations improved correlations from R2of 0.35 to 0.66 and R2of 0.56 to 0.89 when comparing OMI HCHO and MODIS PRI satellite with HCHO field measurements, respectively.



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