IEEE Organizations related to Neuroethology

Back to Top


Conferences related to Neuroethology

Back to Top

2020 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

One of the flagship conferences for the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS)


2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

The International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) is the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s biggest conference and one of the leading international forums for robotics researchers to present their work.


2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

Neural Engineering

  • 2003 1st International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2005 2nd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2007 3rd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problems associated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, the electrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, the analysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi-scale from the single-cell and to the system levels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implants and wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problemsassociated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, theelectrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, theanalysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi -scale from the single -cell and to the systemlevels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implantsand wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2017 8th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural Engineering is an emerging core discipline,which coalesces neuroscience with engineering.Members of both the Neuroscience and Engineering Communities areencouraged to attend this highly multidisciplinarymeeting. The conference will highlight the emergingengineering innovations in the restoration andenhancement of impaired sensory, motor, andcognitive functions, novel engineering for deepeningknowledge of brain function, and advanced designand use of neurotechnologies



Periodicals related to Neuroethology

Back to Top

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Multimedia, IEEE

IEEE Multimedia Magazine covers a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications. Articles, product reviews, new product descriptions, book reviews, and announcements of conferences and workshops cover topics that include hardware and software for media compression, coding and processing; media representations and standards for storage, editing, interchange, transmission and presentation; hardware platforms supporting multimedia applications; operating systems suitable ...


Sensors Journal, IEEE

The Field of Interest of the IEEE Sensors Journal is the science and applications of sensing phenomena, including theory, design, and application of devices for sensing and transducing physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. The emphasis is on the electronics, physics, biology, and intelligence aspects of sensors and integrated sensor-actuators. (IEEE Guide for Authors) (The fields of interest of the IEEE ...




Xplore Articles related to Neuroethology

Back to Top

A Biomimetic Active Electrolocation Sensor for Detection of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Blood Vessels

IEEE Sensors Journal, 2012

Weakly electric fish sense their surroundings in complete darkness by active electrolocation. In a biomimetic approach, we designed catheter-based technical sensor systems working according to the same biological principles that could be used for medical diagnostics of arteriosclerosis. Several measurements using artificial blood vessels, computer simulations, and a physical test bed showed that it is possible to detect and analyze ...


Non-visual orientation and communication by fishes using electrical fields: A model system for underwater robotics

2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2012

Building autonomous underwater robots is a challenging problem. Different sensory modalities have been employed successfully, some inspired by human and animal senses. The European ANGELS project uses an electric sense inspired by weakly electric fish. These fish have the unique ability to navigate and orient in complete darkness by using self-produced electrical fields. They emit electric signals into the environment, ...


Computational Neuroethology: A Provisional Manifesto

From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior, None

This paper questions approaches to computational modeling of neural mechanisms underlying behaviour. It examines the “simplifying” (connectionist) models used in computational neuroscience and concludes that, unless embedded within a sensorimotor system, they are meaningless. The implication is that future models should be situated within closed-environment simulation systems: output of the simulated nervous system is then expressed as observable behaviour. This ...


The Computational Hoverfly; a Study in Computational Neuroethology

From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior, None

Studies in computer vision have only recently realised the advantage of adding a behavioural component to vision systems, enabling them to make programmed ‘eye movements’. Such an animate vision capability allows the system to employ a nonuniform or foveal sampling strategy, with gaze-control mechanisms repositioning the limited high-resolution area of the visual field. The hoverfly Syritta pipiens is an insect ...


What Is the Limit of Redundancy Reduction with Divisive Normalization?

Neural Computation, 2013

Divisive normalization has been proposed as a nonlinear redundancy reduction mechanism capturing contrast correlations. Its basic function is a radial rescaling of the population response. Because of the saturation of divisive normalization, however, it is impossible to achieve a fully independent representation. In this letter, we derive an analytical upper bound on the inevitable residual redundancy of any saturating radial ...



Educational Resources on Neuroethology

Back to Top

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Neuroethology"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • A Biomimetic Active Electrolocation Sensor for Detection of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Blood Vessels

    Weakly electric fish sense their surroundings in complete darkness by active electrolocation. In a biomimetic approach, we designed catheter-based technical sensor systems working according to the same biological principles that could be used for medical diagnostics of arteriosclerosis. Several measurements using artificial blood vessels, computer simulations, and a physical test bed showed that it is possible to detect and analyze vulnerable plaques in blood vessels and that our method of signal production and analysis is principally suitable for medical diagnostics.

  • Non-visual orientation and communication by fishes using electrical fields: A model system for underwater robotics

    Building autonomous underwater robots is a challenging problem. Different sensory modalities have been employed successfully, some inspired by human and animal senses. The European ANGELS project uses an electric sense inspired by weakly electric fish. These fish have the unique ability to navigate and orient in complete darkness by using self-produced electrical fields. They emit electric signals into the environment, which in turn they perceive with an array of electroreceptor organs in their skin. The fish's whole body serves as an antenna, which shapes the emitted electrical field. As a result, the animals are able to detect, localize and analyze objects in their vicinity and to perceive a 3-dimensional electrical picture of their surroundings. Here, we review biological experimental results highlighting the animal's perceptual abilities, which allow them to navigate in extreme environments where vision can not be used. In addition, electric fishes use electric signals for communication. Behavioral communication strategies such as synchronization of electric signals and fixed-order-signaling can play a role in group coherence. Because of their unique sensory abilities, electric fish can serve as a model system for roboticists building underwater vehicles that can communicate and navigate in extreme environments where vision is not possible. In ANGELS, the electric sense is used to navigate a robot without knowledge of the surroundings, keep multi robots in formation, reconstruct an image of the environment and communicate between different robots - all inspired by our biological investigations.

  • Computational Neuroethology: A Provisional Manifesto

    This paper questions approaches to computational modeling of neural mechanisms underlying behaviour. It examines the “simplifying” (connectionist) models used in computational neuroscience and concludes that, unless embedded within a sensorimotor system, they are meaningless. The implication is that future models should be situated within closed-environment simulation systems: output of the simulated nervous system is then expressed as observable behaviour. This approach is referred to as “computational neuroethology”. Computational neuroethology offers a firmer grounding for the semantics of the model, eliminating subjectivity from the resultinterpretation process. A number of more fundamental implications of the approach are also discussed, chief of which is that insect cognition should be studied in preference to mammalian cognition.

  • The Computational Hoverfly; a Study in Computational Neuroethology

    Studies in computer vision have only recently realised the advantage of adding a behavioural component to vision systems, enabling them to make programmed ‘eye movements’. Such an animate vision capability allows the system to employ a nonuniform or foveal sampling strategy, with gaze-control mechanisms repositioning the limited high-resolution area of the visual field. The hoverfly Syritta pipiens is an insect that exhibits foveal animate vision behaviour highly similar to the corresponding activity in humans. This paper discusses a simulation model of Syritta created for studying the neural processes underlying such visually guided behaviour. The approach differs from standard “neural network” modeling techniques in that the simulated Syritta exists within a elosed simulated environment, i.e. there is no need for human intervention: such an approach is an example of computational neuroethology.

  • What Is the Limit of Redundancy Reduction with Divisive Normalization?

    Divisive normalization has been proposed as a nonlinear redundancy reduction mechanism capturing contrast correlations. Its basic function is a radial rescaling of the population response. Because of the saturation of divisive normalization, however, it is impossible to achieve a fully independent representation. In this letter, we derive an analytical upper bound on the inevitable residual redundancy of any saturating radial rescaling mechanism.

  • Locomotion control of a bio-robotic system via electric stimulation

    This paper investigates the reaction of a living insect to electric stimulation. Artificial electrical stimulation is one of the tools of neuroethology to investigate the neural system. By creating artificial inputs to the system, specific reaction can be observed. The escape turn is a well- known reaction pattern of an insect in response to the appearance of a predator. In the first part we analyze the locomotory reaction of an insect (Periplaneta Americana) to various electrical stimuli. These stimulus-reaction measurements are done on a light-weight styro-foam trackball which is connected to a computer. This allows us to record the turning rate and the forward movement of the insect in response to antennal stimulation. Based on this data a simple mathematical model is established. As a simple example of an autonomous bio-robotic system and to verify the black-box model an electronic backpack which does line-tracking has been built. Using two photosensors as inputs the electronic backpack forces the insect to walk along a black line.

  • Physical and Temporal Scaling Considerations in a Robot Model of Cricket Calling Song Preference

    Behavioral experiments with crickets show that female crickets respond to male calling songs with syllable rates within a certain bandwidth only. We have made a robot model in which we implement a simple neural controller that is less complex than the controllers traditionally hypothesized for cricket phonotaxis and syllable rate preference. The simple controller, which had been successfully used with a slowed and simplified signal, is here demonstrated to function, using songs with identical parameters to those found in real male cricket song, using an analog electronic model of the peripheral auditory morphology of the female cricket as the sensor. We put the robot under the same experimental conditions as the female crickets, and it responds with phonotaxis to calling songs of real male <italic>Gryllus bimaculatus</italic>. Further, the robot only responds to songs with syllable rates within a bandwidth similar to the bandwidth found for crickets. By making polar plots of the heading direction of the robot, we obtain behavioral data that can be used in statistical analyses. These analyses show that there are statistically significant differences between the behavioral responses to calling songs with syllable rates within the bandwidth and calling songs with syllable rates outside the bandwidth. This gives the verification that the simple neural control mechanism (together with morphological auditory matched filtering) can account for the syllable rate preference found in female crickets. With our robot system, we can now systematically explore the mechanisms controlling recognition and choice behavior in the female cricket by experimental replication.

  • Phototaxic Foraging of the Archaepaddler, a Hypothetical Deep-Sea Species

    An autonomous agent (animat, hypothetical animal), called the (archae) paddler, is simulated in sufficient detail to regard its simulated aquatic locomotion (paddling) as physically possible. The paddler is supposed to be a model of an animal that might exist, although it is perfectly possible to view it as a model of a robot that might be built. The agent is assumed to navigate in a simulated deep-sea environment, where it forages for autoluminescent prey. It uses a biologically inspired phototaxic foraging strategy, while paddling in a layer just above the bottom. The advantage of this living space is that the navigation problem—and hence our model—is essentially two- dimensional. Moreover, the deep-sea environment is physically simple (and hence easy to simulate): no significant currents, constant temperature, completely dark. A foraging performance metric is developed that circumvents the necessity to solve the traveling salesman problem. A parametric simulation study then quantifies the influence of habitat factors, such as the density of prey, and body geometry (e.g., placement, direction and directional selectivity of the eyes) on foraging success. Adequate performance proves to require a specific body geometry adapted to the habitat characteristics. In general, performance degrades gracefully for modest changes of the geometric and habitat parameters, indicating that we work in a stable region of “design space.” The parameters have to strike a compromise between, on the one hand, the ability to “fixate” an attractive target, and on the other hand, to “see” as many targets at the same time as possible. One important conclusion is that simple reflex-based navigation can be surprisingly efficient. Additionally, performance in a global task (foraging) depends strongly on local parameters such as visual direction tuning, position of the eyes and paddles, and so forth. Behavior and habitat “mold” the body, and the body geometry strongly influences performance. The resulting platform enables further testing of foraging strategies or vision and locomotion theories stemming either from biology or from robotics.

  • Multimodal localization of a flying bat

    We present a new multimodal system that combines stereoscopic and audio-based source localization to track the position of a flying bat. Also presented are novel algorithms for audio source localization. The bat was allowed to fly in an anechoic room and monitored by two high-speed video cameras. The vocalizations of the bat were simultaneously recorded from six microphones. The data was then processed offline to localize the source and reconstruct the trajectory of the bat. We compare the performance of the localization algorithm with the position data obtained from stereoscopic pictures of the bat. The results confirm that the stereoscopic analysis and the audio localization are in good agreement. This system opens up new possibilities for performing multimodal research, and developing more tightly integrated algorithms.

  • Automatic Identification of Functionally Equivalent Olfactory Glomeruli across Individuals

    A key problem faced during the interpretation of calcium imaging data in sensory pathways is identifying brain regions which are be functionally equivalent, i.e. that respond in a correlated fashion to a set of stimuli presented over many trails - such as glomeruli are thought to be in the olfactory system. Here we present a novel automated method for detecting these correlations in neighbouring brain regions which uses only the physiological response characteristics to registrate them across individuals. After applying linear transformations for perspective correction, we show using this method how glomeruli positioning and response tuning during early olfactory coding is largely conserved across individuals of the same species, but there remains some variability. Our algorithm allows us to study the generalised properties of neural coding in different sensory systems or other brain regions, independently from such variations.



Standards related to Neuroethology

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Neuroethology"