IEEE Organizations related to Cultural Neuroscience

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Conferences related to Cultural Neuroscience

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2020 42nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE


2019 IEEE 18th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

The IEEE ICCI*CC series is a flagship conference of its field. It not only synergizes theories of modern information science, computer science, communication theories, AI, cybernetics, computational intelligence, cognitive science, intelligence science, neuropsychology, brain science, systems science, software science, knowledge science, cognitive robots, cognitive linguistics, and life science, but also promotes novel applications in cognitive computers, cognitive communications, computational intelligence, cognitive robots, cognitive systems, and the AI, IT, and software industries.

  • 2018 IEEE 17th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Informatics models of the brainCognitive processes of the brainThe cognitive foundation of big dataMachine consciousnessNeuroscience foundations of information processingDenotational mathematics (DM)Cognitive knowledge basesAutonomous machine learningNeural models of memoryInternal information processingCognitive sensors and networksCognitive linguisticsAbstract intelligence (aI)Cognitive information theoryCognitive information fusionCognitive computersCognitive systemsCognitive man-machine communicationCognitive InternetWorld-Wide Wisdoms (WWW+)Mathematical engineering for AICognitive vehicle systems Semantic computingDistributed intelligenceMathematical models of AICognitive signal processingCognitive image processing Artificial neural netsGenetic computingMATLAB models of AIBrain-inspired systemsNeuroinformaticsNeurological foundations of the brainSoftware simulations of the brainBrain-system interfacesNeurocomputingeBrain models

  • 2017 IEEE 16th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive Informatics is a transdisciplinary field that studies the internal information processing mechanisms of the brain, the underlying abstract intelligence theories and denotational mathematics, and their engineering applications in cognitive computing, computational intelligence, and cognitive systems. Cognitive Computing is a cutting-edge paradigm of intelligent computing methodologies and systems based on CI, which implements computational intelligence by autonomous inferences and perceptions mimicking the mechanisms of the brain. CI and CC not only synergize theories of modern information science, computer science, communication theories, AI, cybernetics, computational intelligence, cognitive science, intelligence science, neuropsychology, brain science, systems science, software science, knowledge science, cognitive robots, cognitive linguistics, and life science, but also reveal exciting applications in cognitive computers, cognitive robots, and computational intelligence.

  • 2016 IEEE 15th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a transdisciplinary field that studies the internal information processing mechanisms of the brain, the underlying abstract intelligence (¿I) theories and denotational mathematics, and their engineering applications in cognitive computing, computational intelligence, and cognitive systems. Cognitive Computing (CC) is a cutting-edge paradigm of intelligent computing methodologies and systems based on cognitive informatics, which implements computational intelligence by autonomous inferences and perceptions mimicking the mechanisms of the brain.

  • 2015 IEEE 14th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    The scope of the conference covers cognitive informatics, cognitive computing, cognitive communications, computational intelligence, and computational linguitics.

  • 2014 IEEE 13th International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive informatics, cognitive computing, cognitive science, cognitive robots, artificial intelligence, computational intelligence

  • 2013 12th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a cutting-edge and multidisciplinary research field that tackles the fundamental problems shared by modern informatics, computing, AI, cybernetics, computational intelligence, cognitive science, intelligence science, neuropsychology, brain science, systems science, software engineering, knowledge engineering, cognitive robots, scientific philosophy, cognitive linguistics, life sciences, and cognitive computing.

  • 2012 11th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive informatics and Cognitive Computing are a transdisciplinary enquiry on the internal information processing mechanisms and processes of the brain and their engineering applications in cognitive computers, computational intelligence, cognitive robots, cognitive systems, and in the AI, IT, and software industries. The 11th IEEE Int l Conference on Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC 12) focuses on the theme of e-Brain and Cognitive Computers.

  • 2011 10th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics & Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC)

    Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing are a transdisciplinary enquiry on the internal information processing mechanisms and processes of the brain and their engineering applications in cognitive computers, computational intelligence, cognitive robots, cognitive systems, and in the AI, IT, and software industries. The 10th IEEE Int l Conference on Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing (ICCI*CC 11) focuses on the theme of Cognitive Computers and the e-Brain.

  • 2010 9th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)

    Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a cutting-edge and transdisciplinary research area that tackles the fundamental problems shared by modern informatics, computing, AI, cybernetics, computational intelligence, cognitive science, neuropsychology, medical science, systems science, software engineering, telecommunications, knowledge engineering, philosophy, linguistics, economics, management science, and life sciences.

  • 2009 8th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)

    The 8th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI 09) focuses on the theme of Cognitive Computing and Semantic Mining. The objectives of ICCI'09 are to draw attention of researchers, practitioners, and graduate students to the investigation of cognitive mechanisms and processes of human information processing, and to stimulate the international effort on cognitive informatics research and engineering applications.

  • 2008 7th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)

    The 7th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI 08) focuses on the theme of Cognitive Computers and Computational Intelligence. The objectives of ICCI 08 are to draw attention of researchers, practitioners and graduate students to the investigation of cognitive mechanisms and processes of human information processing, and to stimulate the international effort on cognitive informatics research and engineering applications.

  • 2007 6th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)

  • 2006 5th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)

  • 2005 4th IEEE International Conference on Cognitive Informatics (ICCI)


2019 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN)

IJCNN covers a wide range of topics in the field of neural networks, from biological neural network modeling to artificial neural computation.


2014 Annual Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biomedical Science and Engineering Center Conference (BSEC)

Advancing our understanding of how the brain works has emerged as the leading research focus area for the coming decade. Such advancement is expected to have a marked impact in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of neural and mental disorders. Critical innovations in neuroimaging, nanosensors, multi-scale modeling, and large-scale data analytics for multimodal brain data are needed to bridge the gap between molecules and mind. The conference aims to bring together researchers from all disciplines at the intersection of neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, nanotechnology, radiology, chemistry, biology, computer science, and data sciences.

  • 2013 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

    The central theme of the conference is Integrating Experiments, Simulations and Modeling for Biomedical Advances: From Single Molecules to Public Health Dynamics. From studying individual molecular events to modeling how diseases spread within heterogeneous populations, there is an increasing need to integrate information from disparate sources (including social media and crowd-sourcing), high through-put experiments to large-scale computational simulations, multi-modality patient data. Mathematical modeling and analysis are indispensible in understanding spatiotemporal behaviors of complex biomedical systems. Bringing together researchers from disparate scientific disciplines and organizations is essential to gain novel insights and to propose innovative solutions to the theoretical, methodological and analytical problems of such challenging knowledge discovery undertake. The conference will cover both basic research and translational aspects of interdisciplinary collaborations.

  • 2011 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

    Image formation & processing, Multi-modality integration and inference, Computer-aided diagnostics and prognostics, Informatics and data management

  • 2010 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC)

    BSEC 2010 will highlight biomedical research and analysis in neuroscience (BRAiN) with specific emphasis on brain injuries and neuro-regeneration. Session topics include neuroscience applications of biomedical informatics, biomedical modeling and simulation, neuroscience applications of measurement science, and neuroscience/neuroanatomy.

  • 2009 First Annual ORNL Biomedical Science & Engineering Conference (BSEC): Exploring the Intersections of Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research

    This conference provides an opportunity for researchers from cross-cutting disciplines to discover new technologies, exchange ideas, research experiences, and visions in the fields of biomedical informatics, modeling, measurement science, and imaging technologies. The conference theme is: Innovative, interdisciplinary research trends in biomedical technologies and research for maximum application-specific problem solving.


2014 International Conference on Ubi-Media Computing (U-Media)

Ubi-media InfrastructureHierogeneous Ubi-media InfrastructureUbiquitous Sensor Networks / RFIDNew Ubi-media DevicesMultimedia Embedded SystemsUbi-media Storage and Indexing3G and Advanced Communication TechniquesCross-Network Communication TechniquesUbi-media MiddlewareContext-Aware MultimediaCross-Network Media ServerComputational Intelligences in Ubi-mediaSemantic Web and Knowledge GridUbi-media Content Protection and SecurityPrivacy and Security in Ubiquitous EnvironmentsUbiquitous Surveillance and ForensicsUbiquitous Human-Device InterfacesAdaptive Graphics Rendering TechniquesVisualization of Ubi-media InformationNomadic Video ConferencingUbi-media ApplicationsUbi-media for EducationUbi-media for CommerceUbi-media for GamesUbi-media for Health CareUbi-media for Smart Home


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Periodicals related to Cultural Neuroscience

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Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computing in Science & Engineering

Physics, medicine, astronomy—these and other hard sciences share a common need for efficient algorithms, system software, and computer architecture to address large computational problems. And yet, useful advances in computational techniques that could benefit many researchers are rarely shared. To meet that need, Computing in Science & Engineering (CiSE) presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format. ...


Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, IEEE Transactions on

Statistical and structural pattern recognition; image analysis; computational models of vision; computer vision systems; enhancement, restoration, segmentation, feature extraction, shape and texture analysis; applications of pattern analysis in medicine, industry, government, and the arts and sciences; artificial intelligence, knowledge representation, logical and probabilistic inference, learning, speech recognition, character and text recognition, syntactic and semantic processing, understanding natural language, expert systems, ...



Most published Xplore authors for Cultural Neuroscience

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Xplore Articles related to Cultural Neuroscience

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Legal and policy questions for international collaboration in neuroscience

Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Neural Information Processing, 2002. ICONIP '02., 2002

The requirements for neuroinformatics to make a significant impact on the field of neuroscience as a whole are not simply technical - the hardware, software, and protocols for collaborative research - they also include the legal and policy frameworks within which research is conducted. This is not least because the creation of large collaborative scientific databases amplifies the complicated interactions ...


A cross-cultural study of acceptance and use of robotics by future psychology practitioners

2015 24th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), 2015

Research in robotics has made available numerous possibilities and tools for further innovation in the psychological practice. For instance, recent research provided many examples of possible applications of robots in the education and rehabilitation of people with learning difficulties and/or intellectual disabilities. In this paper, we present a study on how cultural backgrounds can influence the perception and intention to ...


How Japanese Traditional "Omonpakari" Services are Delivered - A Multidisciplinary Approach

2012 Annual SRII Global Conference, 2012

In high-quality Japanese services, providers are often said to sense what their customers want from subtle cues and deliver a customized service without explicitly advertising the effort. To understand this subtle service, often called "Omonpakari," we studied a high-end Sushi restaurant using multidisciplinary approach--using neuroscience to analyze the cognitive characteristic, ethno methodology to analyze the interactive structure, and computer science ...


5.3: Presentation session: Keynote speaker and making a difference: Identifying and closing the knowledge gaps discussion/forum: “An engineer's view of neuroscience”

2010 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference, 2010

The neuroscience-related challenges facing civilian and military communities are significant. From nervous system trauma to neurodegenerative diseases, the burden of neurological problems is large. Engineering and computation are poised to make major contributions to understanding nervous system dynamics in health and disease, as well as offer innovative solutions to pressing neurological problems. This presentation will address these challenges, offer a ...


Storytelling as a primary leadership tool

2016 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2016

Storytelling is a foundational activity in every human culture, and the stories humans tell emanate from and result in each culture's unique history and mythology. Storytelling can also be an effective business tool for the creation of workplace culture. In the hands of capable leaders, storytelling can build strong culture, resulting in high employee engagement, which leads to high performance ...


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Educational Resources on Cultural Neuroscience

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Legal and policy questions for international collaboration in neuroscience

    The requirements for neuroinformatics to make a significant impact on the field of neuroscience as a whole are not simply technical - the hardware, software, and protocols for collaborative research - they also include the legal and policy frameworks within which research is conducted. This is not least because the creation of large collaborative scientific databases amplifies the complicated interactions between proprietary, for-profit R&D and public "open science". We draw on experiences from the field of bioinformatics to examine some of the likely consequences of these interactions in neuroscience. The widespread sharing of data and tools for neuroscientific research is a key step in the development of neuroinformatics. We consider some of the areas in which policy frameworks can facilitate these forms of collaboration, by easing legal and cultural barriers which have slowed developments to date.

  • A cross-cultural study of acceptance and use of robotics by future psychology practitioners

    Research in robotics has made available numerous possibilities and tools for further innovation in the psychological practice. For instance, recent research provided many examples of possible applications of robots in the education and rehabilitation of people with learning difficulties and/or intellectual disabilities. In this paper, we present a study on how cultural backgrounds can influence the perception and intention to use a robot as an instrument in the future practice. The study involved 37 Italian students and 37 UK students, as future professionals in the field of psychology, which experienced the actual capabilities of a humanoid robot through a live demo. In this work, we explored the main factors of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) with the aim to reveal cultural differences. The instrument used was the UTAUT questionnaire, which was designed and validated to investigate the robot acceptance and use. A significant difference on the intention to use the robot is reported in our results. The discriminant analysis produced a very high degree of separation between the two groups, confirming that there is a different approach toward the use of robotics between the two cultures.

  • How Japanese Traditional "Omonpakari" Services are Delivered - A Multidisciplinary Approach

    In high-quality Japanese services, providers are often said to sense what their customers want from subtle cues and deliver a customized service without explicitly advertising the effort. To understand this subtle service, often called "Omonpakari," we studied a high-end Sushi restaurant using multidisciplinary approach--using neuroscience to analyze the cognitive characteristic, ethno methodology to analyze the interactive structure, and computer science to analyze the social evaluations. The study based on neuroscience showed that the service brain model could explain the cognition of "Omonpakari" service regardless of customers' gender, knowledge and the social context. The ethno methodological analysis revealed that customers performed a role, complying with cultural norms and behaving like a culturally appropriate customer even if they might not be. The analysis using computer science techniques showed that expertise was the key factor of evaluation of the services. These findings suggest an alternative model of service in which there is a productive tension, or dialectic, between the provider and the customer.

  • 5.3: Presentation session: Keynote speaker and making a difference: Identifying and closing the knowledge gaps discussion/forum: “An engineer's view of neuroscience”

    The neuroscience-related challenges facing civilian and military communities are significant. From nervous system trauma to neurodegenerative diseases, the burden of neurological problems is large. Engineering and computation are poised to make major contributions to understanding nervous system dynamics in health and disease, as well as offer innovative solutions to pressing neurological problems. This presentation will address these challenges, offer a view over the research and development horizon of emergent technologies, and address cultural issues involved with cross-cutting research.

  • Storytelling as a primary leadership tool

    Storytelling is a foundational activity in every human culture, and the stories humans tell emanate from and result in each culture's unique history and mythology. Storytelling can also be an effective business tool for the creation of workplace culture. In the hands of capable leaders, storytelling can build strong culture, resulting in high employee engagement, which leads to high performance organizations. In this paper, we establish that there are three fundamental types of internal business communications, which address the questions of “what do we do,” “how do we do it,” and “why do we do it.” We next establish that storytelling is well-suited to motivate and inspire employees. We briefly summarize the five different types of stories, and establish that, while several types of stories are routinely told in the business environment, mythologies are well suited to motivate and inspire employees by answering the deeper, more meaningful questions around why our business exists. Next, we present an integrated view of storytelling from three perspectives: Jungian Depth Psychology, Mythology, and Neuroscience. We establish that Jungian Depth Psychology describes all humans as having common, universal mysteries to explain, and that they use common symbols to represent their understanding of these mysteries. Mythological stories and culture then emerge as a result of these common mysteries, coupled with unique group history and environment. We next establish that emerging neuroscience shows that storytelling is powerfully received in the human brain, and engages our brains more profoundly than other methods of communication. Finally we present a simple framework for leaders to use storytelling within their organizations. This framework includes practical thought models to use when driving cultural change or amplification via storytelling.

  • Learning and the Evolution of Language: The Role of Cultural Variation and Learning Costs in the Baldwin Effect

    The Baldwin effect has been explicitly used by Pinker and Bloom as an explanation of the origins of language and the evolution of a language acquisition device. This article presents new simulations of an artificial life model for the evolution of compositional languages. It specifically addresses the role of cultural variation and of learning costs in the Baldwin effect for the evolution of language. Results show that when a high cost is associated with language learning, agents gradually assimilate in their genome some explicit features (e.g., lexical properties) of the specific language they are exposed to. When the structure of the language is allowed to vary through cultural transmission, Baldwinian processes cause, instead, the assimilation of a predisposition to learn, rather than any structural properties associated with a specific language. The analysis of the mechanisms underlying such a predisposition in terms of categorical perception supports Deacon's hypothesis regarding the Baldwinian inheritance of general underlying cognitive capabilities that serve language acquisition. This is in opposition to the thesis that argues for assimilation of structural properties needed for the specification of a full-blown language acquisition device.

  • The design and implementation of University Digital Museum platform based on DSpace

    The digital museum of university is conducive to the preservation and utilization of precious cultural assets. This thesis describes the framework of a digital museum platform of university based on DSpace, including data models, metadata, searching and browsing, user interface, as well as the secondary development of DSpace platform and localization work. The platform, put into application in Beijing Normal University Digital Museum, has achieved good results, featuring an easy expansion, stable operation, convenient retrieval and flexible display.

  • Dynamic Cultural Influences on Neural Representations of the Self

    People living in multicultural environments often encounter situations which require them to acquire different cultural schemas and to switch between these cultural schemas depending on their immediate sociocultural context. Prior behavioral studies show that priming cultural schemas reliably impacts mental processes and behavior underlying self-concept. However, less well understood is whether or not cultural priming affects neurobiological mechanisms underlying the self. Here we examined whether priming cultural values of individualism and collectivism in bicultural individuals affects neural activity in cortical midline structures underlying self-relevant processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Biculturals primed with individualistic values showed increased activation within medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) during general relative to contextual self-judgments, whereas biculturals primed with collectivistic values showed increased response within MPFC and PCC during contextual relative to general self-judgments. Moreover, degree of cultural priming was positively correlated with degree of MPFC and PCC activity during culturally congruent self-judgments. These findings illustrate the dynamic influence of culture on neural representations underlying the self and, more broadly, suggest a neurobiological basis by which people acculturate to novel environments.

  • Cross-cultural Reading the Mind in the Eyes: An fMRI Investigation

    The ability to infer others' thoughts, intentions, and feelings is regarded as uniquely human. Over the last few decades, this remarkable ability has captivated the attention of philosophers, primatologists, clinical and developmental psychologists, anthropologists, social psychologists, and cognitive neuroscientists. Most would agree that the capacity to reason about others' mental states is innately prepared, essential for successful human social interaction. Whether this ability is culturally tuned, however, remains entirely uncharted on both the behavioral and neural levels. Here we provide the first behavioral and neural evidence for an intracultural advantage (better performance for same- vs. other-culture) in mental state decoding in a sample of native Japanese and white American participants. We examined the neural correlates of this intracultural advantage using fMRI, revealing greater bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci recruitment during same- versus other-culture mental state decoding in both cultural groups. These findings offer preliminary support for cultural consistency in the neurological architecture subserving high-level mental state reasoning, as well as its differential recruitment based on cultural group membership.

  • Signaling Games and the Evolution of Structure in Language and Music: A Reply to Ravignani and Verhoef (2018)‡

    In their commentary on our work, Ravignani and Verhoef (2018) raise concerns about two methodological aspects of our experimental paradigm (the signaling game): (1) the use of melodic signals of fixed length and duration, and (2) the fact that signals are endowed with meaning. They argue that music is hardly a semantic system and that our methodological choices may limit the capacity of our paradigm to shed light on the emergence and evolution of a number of putative musical universals. We reply that musical systems are semantic systems and that the aim of our research is not to study musical universals as such, but to compare more closely the kinds of principles that organize meaning and structure in linguistic and musical systems.



Standards related to Cultural Neuroscience

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No standards are currently tagged "Cultural Neuroscience"


Jobs related to Cultural Neuroscience

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