IEEE Organizations related to Smartglasses

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No conferences are currently tagged "Smartglasses"


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Instrumentation and Measurement, IEEE Transactions on

Measurements and instrumentation utilizing electrical and electronic techniques.


Sensors Journal, IEEE

The Field of Interest of the IEEE Sensors Journal is the science and applications of sensing phenomena, including theory, design, and application of devices for sensing and transducing physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. The emphasis is on the electronics, physics, biology, and intelligence aspects of sensors and integrated sensor-actuators. (IEEE Guide for Authors) (The fields of interest of the IEEE ...



Most published Xplore authors for Smartglasses

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Xplore Articles related to Smartglasses

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A New Stimulation for Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials Based Brain-Computer Interface Using Semi-transmissive Patterns with Smartglasses

2015 International Conference on Cyberworlds (CW), 2015

Brain-computer interface (BCI) has attracted attention as a new type of interface for both healthy and health-challenged individuals. Many BCI studies using steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) have been reported. However, the conventional SSVEP-based BCI was found difficult to use as a versatile interface in real-life settings because the system included several types of apparatuses and computers that are not ...


Heat is in the eye of the beholder: Towards better authenticating on smartglasses

2016 9th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI), 2016

Smart and wearable devices are trendy electronic objects that have become increasingly popular in recent years. Those devices are, by definition, tightly connected with the user's personal activities. Authentication is therefore a critical feature for both identifying users and personalizing the services on the device. In particular, the emergence of smartglasses changed the way we thought a wearable could assist ...


User Interface Beaming -- Seamless Interaction with Smart Things Using Personal Wearable Computers

2014 11th International Conference on Wearable and Implantable Body Sensor Networks Workshops, 2014

For the Internet of Things to be adopted in people's homes and at their workplaces, it is important to provide mechanisms that support them when controlling and monitoring smart things in their surroundings. We present the concept of user interface beaming, where the capabilities of different personal wearable computers are combined to allow users to conveniently interact with smart things ...


Using smartglasses for utility-meter reading

2015 IEEE Sensors Applications Symposium (SAS), 2015

Despite the increasing adoption of smart meters, especially for electrical power measurements, a very large number of utility inspectors manually execute readings of legacy analog meters (e.g., for gas or water utilities). Unfortunately, manual data collection generates a lot of paperworks and is clearly error prone. In this work, authors suggest the adoption of smartglasses to automatize this process. In ...


Not a tile out of place: Toward creating context-dependent user interfaces on smartglasses

2016 9th International Conference on Human System Interactions (HSI), 2016

Despite the rapid pace of gadgets released on the market, research in the area of usable interfaces for wearables is lagging behind. Smartglasses are new wearables that embed diverse sensors but also have small displays, and this makes it hard for the wearer to visualize real-time data. To bridge this gap, the contribution of this paper is threefold. First, we ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • A New Stimulation for Steady-State Visually Evoked Potentials Based Brain-Computer Interface Using Semi-transmissive Patterns with Smartglasses

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has attracted attention as a new type of interface for both healthy and health-challenged individuals. Many BCI studies using steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) have been reported. However, the conventional SSVEP-based BCI was found difficult to use as a versatile interface in real-life settings because the system included several types of apparatuses and computers that are not easily portable. Therefore, we investigated a new SSVEP-based BCI, our system included smart glasses for visual stimuli and employed a mobile neuro-headset for measuring electro- encephalogram (EEG) signals. We conducted experiments using a two-class SSVEP with our system. An SSVEP dataset from five healthy subjects was used in averaging classification performance. The classification performance depended on the viewing area of pattern reversal on the smart glasses was estimated. The accuracy rate was high when a large pattern was used. Next, the classification performance in three different situations -- a resting state, a walking state, and a conversation state -- was measured. Classifiers using features up to the second harmonic SSVEP signals gave a mean accuracy rate of 0.70 at the resting state.

  • Heat is in the eye of the beholder: Towards better authenticating on smartglasses

    Smart and wearable devices are trendy electronic objects that have become increasingly popular in recent years. Those devices are, by definition, tightly connected with the user's personal activities. Authentication is therefore a critical feature for both identifying users and personalizing the services on the device. In particular, the emergence of smartglasses changed the way we thought a wearable could assist users in their daily activities. As designed by commercial providers, smartglasses are sold with a very specific set of interactions capabilities. These capabilities have a strong impact on how comfortably or safely users may authenticate to their smartglasses. For this reason, we investigate in this paper the different authentication methods available for smartphones and we comparatively position the smartglasses in the design space of authentication methods. We propose a new approach based on touch input on an arbitrary surface using thermal camera input. This approach aims to circumvent the lack of touch surface provided by smartglasses, while maintaining an acceptable level of security.

  • User Interface Beaming -- Seamless Interaction with Smart Things Using Personal Wearable Computers

    For the Internet of Things to be adopted in people's homes and at their workplaces, it is important to provide mechanisms that support them when controlling and monitoring smart things in their surroundings. We present the concept of user interface beaming, where the capabilities of different personal wearable computers are combined to allow users to conveniently interact with smart things in their environment. Smartglasses are used to select a target smart thing by means of current object recognition technologies. Then, an appropriate user interface for the target is rendered on the user's smartwatch. This interface is continuously updated to reflect state changes of the target and can be used to interact with that smart thing using different interaction modalities.

  • Using smartglasses for utility-meter reading

    Despite the increasing adoption of smart meters, especially for electrical power measurements, a very large number of utility inspectors manually execute readings of legacy analog meters (e.g., for gas or water utilities). Unfortunately, manual data collection generates a lot of paperworks and is clearly error prone. In this work, authors suggest the adoption of smartglasses to automatize this process. In particular, the embedded camera is used for barcode scanning (in order to identify the user) and for recognizing the meter dial values. The availability of an Internet connection finally allows for exploiting cloud-based repository solutions. In that way data can be easily accessed from both utility employees and customers using simple web services. A preliminary prototype based on the Vuzix M100 device has been realized. Some tests have been carried out, confirming the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  • Not a tile out of place: Toward creating context-dependent user interfaces on smartglasses

    Despite the rapid pace of gadgets released on the market, research in the area of usable interfaces for wearables is lagging behind. Smartglasses are new wearables that embed diverse sensors but also have small displays, and this makes it hard for the wearer to visualize real-time data. To bridge this gap, the contribution of this paper is threefold. First, we propose a data representation model to combine applications and services that match user activities and contexts. Second, we present an approach of showing relevant services to the user based on `tiles' (such as those in recent Microsoft Windows interfaces) while considering the device constraints. Finally, we suggest that combining those two aspects can open the way to personalized services for the end user, creating new ways of interacting with applications and devices.

  • Pedestrian Dead Reckoning With Smartglasses and Smartwatch

    Wearable miniature inertial sensors have been widely used for pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR). Typical low-cost PDR systems use sensors attached to either the human trunk or feet. The recent emergence of smartglasses and smart watches provides an opportunity to use both types of wearable devices in position tracking. This paper proposes a novel method of utilizing both a smartwatch and smartglasses for PDR. The general idea is to use the relative angle between arm swing direction and head direction to detect any head-turn motion that would otherwise skew the position dead reckoning propagation. A complete PDR solution that includes step detection, step length estimation, head-rotation detection, and dead reckoning using a smartwatch and smartglasses that are currently available in the market is presented. Using the smartglasses, step detection with an error rate less than 0.4% and a cumulative distance error of less than 2.4% on 800 m walks and runs is achieved. In the dead reckoning field experiments, the proposed algorithm produces result that closely track the actual path when plotted on Google Maps, outperforming solutions that only use the smartwatch or smartglasses alone.

  • An augmented reality system for technical staff training

    Augmented reality (AR) systems are getting more and more popular in several application fields, such as medicine, education, cultural heritage, etc. The recent hardware development of AR-oriented smartglasses extends these applications to hands-free contexts, in which the user cannot hold a tablet or a smartphone device. An example of this scenario is the ARsupported technical training of human operators. In this paper, we propose an AR smartglasses- based system for the training of technical staff working on ship engine parts. The size of components and the impossibility to use fiducial markers led to the development of an ad-hoc detection and tracking algorithm to align virtual parts over the real-world images. The system is currently under evaluation by a large multinational company leader in the field of marine market.

  • Motion Mode Recognition for Indoor Pedestrian Navigation Using Portable Devices

    While indoor portable navigation using portable devices is becoming increasingly required, it faces many challenges in obtaining accurate positioning performance. One of the methods to improve navigation results is to recognize the mode of motion of the user carrying the portable device containing low-cost microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) motion sensors. Pattern recognition methodology has been employed to detect a group of motion modes that are common indoors, namely, walking, stationary, going up/down stairs, standing on an escalator, walking on an escalator, standing on a moving walkway, and walking on a moving walkway. The performance of the motion mode recognition module was examined on different types of mobile computing devices, including various brands of smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, and smartglasses, and the results obtained showed the capability of enhancing positioning performance. The module does not require satellite or wireless positioning signals, and depends only on MEMS sensors.

  • A Novel Augmented Reality Guidance System for Future Informatization Experimental Teaching

    Education based on augmented reality technology is a new direction of experimental teaching. With the advantages of visualization, informatization, intelligence and convenience, AR teaching can replace the traditional teaching in the future. A novel AR guidance system for experimental teaching with smart glasses has been improved to build an advanced system architecture using new software platform. It covers the whole experimental guiding process with better performance on real time, and time delay has been greatly improved. The new system can recognize the experiment platform and render virtual information into the reality scene, including experimental introduction and guidance content in various forms. Furthermore, some new features have been added to the new system - test and analyze the experimental result. It is more convenient for learners to complete the experiment without teachers than the previous system.

  • Smart Glasses: A semantic fisheye view on tiled user interfaces

    With the evolution of mobile technology, many devices are introduced with very limited screen sizes like smart glasses. This technology must be accompanied with new visualization techniques. A classic interface can't meet the expectations of the user who becomes increasingly hard to please. The challenge is to display information and allow the user a better navigation with less effort especially in situation of mobility. This paper explores a fisheye view on tiled user interfaces for smart glasses that uses the semantic relationships of items of information contained in the tiles. We propose a reformulation of the degree of interest function and a semantic model for tiled interfaces that supports this reformulation. We developed a prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach and to improve our design approach in our future work.



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