IEEE Organizations related to Quantum-tunneling Composite

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Conferences related to Quantum-tunneling Composite

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

The International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) is the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s biggest conference and one of the leading international forums for robotics researchers to present their work.


2018 31st International Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference (IVNC)

The conference scope covers research and development fields including theories, materials, devices and their applications based on electron emission into vacuum using various kinds of electron emission mechanisms. Especially, miniaturized electron sources fabricated by thin-film and microfabrication technologies and their applications are emphasized.


2018 IEEE International Conference on Information and Automation (ICIA)

Information and Automation


2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics (ROBIO)

ROBIO 2018 provides an opportunity for the academic and industrial communities to address new challenges, share solutions, and discuss future directions in research, development and applications in the dynamic and exciting areas of robotics and biomimetics.


2018 IEEE International Symposium on Haptic, Audio and Visual Environments and Games (HAVE)

Papers are being solicited on all aspects of multimodal haptic audio visual virtual environment technologies and related haptic applications, including Haptic sensors and renderers, Haptoaudiovisual systems and applications, Hapto-sergical/medical systems, Haptic compression and prediction, multimodal perception and psychophysics, Haptic game interfaces, tele-haptics and tele-operation, augmented and virtualized reality, collaborative virtual environments, human-computer interaction in virtual environment.



Periodicals related to Quantum-tunneling Composite

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Electron Devices, IEEE Transactions on

Publishes original and significant contributions relating to the theory, design, performance and reliability of electron devices, including optoelectronics devices, nanoscale devices, solid-state devices, integrated electronic devices, energy sources, power devices, displays, sensors, electro-mechanical devices, quantum devices and electron tubes.


Sensors Journal, IEEE

The Field of Interest of the IEEE Sensors Journal is the science and applications of sensing phenomena, including theory, design, and application of devices for sensing and transducing physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. The emphasis is on the electronics, physics, biology, and intelligence aspects of sensors and integrated sensor-actuators. (IEEE Guide for Authors) (The fields of interest of the IEEE ...



Most published Xplore authors for Quantum-tunneling Composite

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Xplore Articles related to Quantum-tunneling Composite

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Characteristic and sensitivity of Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) material for tactile device applications

2016 7th IEEE Control and System Graduate Research Colloquium (ICSGRC), 2016

This paper investigates the used of Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) Pill as a tactile sensor material for general tactile device application. The QTC Pill can be considered as soft, flexible material and has extraordinary electrical properties. It has capability of turning into a remarkable material for new era sensor. The piezoresistive experimental test of QTC Pill was performed to determine ...


Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) based tactile sensor array for dynamic pressure distribution measurement

2013 Seventh International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST), 2013

This paper presents the design and simulation of a quantum tunneling composite (QTC) based tactile sensor array for use in pressure distribution measurement. QTC exhibits a rapid reduction in resistance with applied force making it suited for use in force sensing applications. Properties of QTC are exploited to design a tactile sensor array capable of measuring a dynamic pressure distribution ...


Integration of a Quantum Tunneling Composite-Based Sensor with the Flexible Actuator for Neurogenic Underactive Bladder

2018 IEEE 13th Annual International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems (NEMS), 2018

The usage of shape memory alloy actuators to restore voiding of the bladder for myogenic underactive bladder (UAB) patients with detrusor contractility disorder has been proposed recently. A successful voiding percentage of about 20% was achieved for an anesthetized rat. However, the neurogenic UAB patients may suffer from nerve damage as well as detrusor disorder that requires an additional sensor ...


Characterization of the Repeatability and Sensitivity of the Quantum Tunneling Composites

2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference (IFETC), 2018

The fast development and expansion of the robotics field and biomedical application in the last several decades have generated a growing interest in the flexible tactile sensing solutions. In this experimental study, the flexible sensor material is characterized by utilizing piezoresistive mechanism based on quantum tunneling composites. With attention to pressure- sensitivity of this composite, the effect of nickel powder ...


Design and simulation of 1-DOF tactile sensor for gripping force measurement

2013 IEEE 8th International Conference on Industrial and Information Systems, 2013

This paper presents the design and simulation of a quantum tunneling composite (QTC) based tactile sensor structure for gripping force measurement. The design presents a tactile sensing element capable 1-DOF force sensing in the z-direction. QTC is a novel electrically conductive elastomeric matrix- nanostructured nickel powder composite. QTC has extremely large, reversible increases in conductivity when compressed, stretched, bent, or ...


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Educational Resources on Quantum-tunneling Composite

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IEEE.tv Videos

ASC-2014 SQUIDs 50th Anniversary: 3 of 6 - Bob Fagaly
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From the Quantum Moore's Law toward Silicon Based Universal Quantum Computing - IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
Q&A with Travis Humble: IEEE Rebooting Computing Podcast, Episode 27
Quantum Technologies in Europe: The Quantum Flagship Initiative - Applied Superconductivity Conference 2018
Physical Restraints on Quantum Circuits - IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
Part 2: Workshop on Benchmarking Quantum Computational Devices and Systems - ICRC 2018
Quantum Accelerators for High-Performance Computing Systems - IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
Superconducting quantum computing research in Japan - Applied Superconductivity Conference 2018
Developing Our Quantum Future - Krysta Svore Keynote - ICRC San Mateo, 2019
Superconducting Quantum Computing in China - Applied Superconductivity Conference 2018
Solving Sparse Representation for Image Classification using Quantum D-Wave 2X Machine - IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
Building a Quantum Computing Community and Ecosystem: Jerry Chow at IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017
Challenges and Opportunities of the NISQ Processors (Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum Computing) - 2018 IEEE Industry Summit on the Future of Computing
Parallel Quantum Computing Emulation - Brian La Cour - ICRC 2018
Nanophotonic Devices for Quantum Information Processing: Optical Computing - Carsten Schuck at INC 2019
D-Wave Quantum Computer: Technology Update - Fabio Altomare - ICRC San Mateo, 2019
An Ising Computer Based on Simulated Quantum Annealing by Path Integral Monte Carlo - IEEE Rebooting Computing 2017

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Characteristic and sensitivity of Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) material for tactile device applications

    This paper investigates the used of Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) Pill as a tactile sensor material for general tactile device application. The QTC Pill can be considered as soft, flexible material and has extraordinary electrical properties. It has capability of turning into a remarkable material for new era sensor. The piezoresistive experimental test of QTC Pill was performed to determine their resistivity characteristics and to evaluate the suitability of QTC Pills as tactile sensors. The experiments were conducted based on the sensitivity of the QTC Pill. The shows that, the QTC Pill was a perfect insulator as well as an extremely good conductor. This has been observed through resistance versus force (R vs F) investigation in which an exponential curve was obtained. This is coherent with the hypothesis of quantum tunneling charge transport within the polymer `assisted' quantum tunneling. The hypothesis is further supported by comparing and contrasting current versus voltage (I vs V) curves. At intermediate pressure, QTC Pill exhibits a clearly not linear hysteric behaviour and current fluctuations. These characteristic features can be related to QTC Pill specific structure and electron quantum tunneling. Based on this investigation, QTC pill are suitable to be used as a material for general tactile device application and can be used as a guideline when designing a tactile sensor with this material.

  • Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) based tactile sensor array for dynamic pressure distribution measurement

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a quantum tunneling composite (QTC) based tactile sensor array for use in pressure distribution measurement. QTC exhibits a rapid reduction in resistance with applied force making it suited for use in force sensing applications. Properties of QTC are exploited to design a tactile sensor array capable of measuring a dynamic pressure distribution over the sensor area. QTC acts a complete conductor after a certain stage reducing its effectiveness as a force sensor beyond that stage. QTC also takes considerable time to return to its original state after deformation due to force. These drawbacks found in QTC, limits its use to only that of a simple low cost switch. The proposed design for the tactile sensor array overcomes these drawbacks found in QTC material by incorporating a novel sensor array structure which enables an extended range of operation and allows rapid return to its unloaded state. This design allows for the use of QTC as a simple, cheap force sensor. The design can be further optimized to match the characteristics of the proposed sensor with the force range of a given application. A collection of such tactile elements is used to create a dynamic force sensing array. The design and simulation of the sensor array structure is described. This sensor array can be connected via a data acquisition system to a computer, which converts the data into a color contour map using LabView and MATLAB to measure and display the force distribution in realtime.

  • Integration of a Quantum Tunneling Composite-Based Sensor with the Flexible Actuator for Neurogenic Underactive Bladder

    The usage of shape memory alloy actuators to restore voiding of the bladder for myogenic underactive bladder (UAB) patients with detrusor contractility disorder has been proposed recently. A successful voiding percentage of about 20% was achieved for an anesthetized rat. However, the neurogenic UAB patients may suffer from nerve damage as well as detrusor disorder that requires an additional sensor to identify the fullness status of the bladder. For this purpose, a flexible quantum tunneling composite (QTC) layer is used to define a strain sensor that is conformably integrated inside the flexible 3D printed vest of the actuator. The QTC sensor showed an increase in the resistance for about 0.61 MΩ during the filling of the rubber model of the bladder up to 5 mL. The resistance change for the sensor during the actuation is also studied.

  • Characterization of the Repeatability and Sensitivity of the Quantum Tunneling Composites

    The fast development and expansion of the robotics field and biomedical application in the last several decades have generated a growing interest in the flexible tactile sensing solutions. In this experimental study, the flexible sensor material is characterized by utilizing piezoresistive mechanism based on quantum tunneling composites. With attention to pressure- sensitivity of this composite, the effect of nickel powder filler ratio and sample thickness are systematically investigated. Electrical resistance and sensitivity of the QTC depend on the concentration and shape of nickel powder. There is a lower threshold of nickel powder concentration for the QTC to be sensitive under 500N force applied. With increasing nickel powder concentration, an elasticity of the QTC decreases, but stability, reproducibility, and sensitivity of the composite improved.

  • Design and simulation of 1-DOF tactile sensor for gripping force measurement

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a quantum tunneling composite (QTC) based tactile sensor structure for gripping force measurement. The design presents a tactile sensing element capable 1-DOF force sensing in the z-direction. QTC is a novel electrically conductive elastomeric matrix- nanostructured nickel powder composite. QTC has extremely large, reversible increases in conductivity when compressed, stretched, bent, or twisted. These properties are exploited to design a tactile sensor capable of measuring a dynamic force over the sensor area. QTC has some drawbacks which have limited its use to a simple pressure switch. One drawback of QTC is that it acts as a complete conductor beyond a certain stage of compression. Another is that it takes considerable time to return to the initial shape after compression. The proposed sensor design is able to overcome these drawbacks by extending the range of operation of QTC and rapidly returning the QTC to its unloaded shape. This design allows for the use of QTC as a simple, cheap force sensor. The design can be further optimized to match the characteristics of the proposed sensor with the force range of a given application. The design and simulation of the sensor structure is described. This sensor is to be connected via a data acquisition system to a computer, which converts the data into a color contour map using LabView and MATLAB to measure and display the pressure distribution in real-time.

  • Development of a Flexible 3-D Tactile Sensor System for Anthropomorphic Artificial Hand

    In this paper, we report a novel flexible tactile sensor array for an anthropomorphic artificial hand with the capability of measuring both normal and shear force distributions using quantum tunneling composite as a base material. There are four fan-shaped electrodes in a cell that decompose the contact force into normal and shear components. The sensor has been realized in a 2 ×  6 array of unit sensors, and each unit sensor responds to normal and shear stresses in all three axes. By applying separated drops of conductive polymer instead of a full layer, cross-talk between the sensor cells is decreased. Furthermore, the voltage mirror method is used in this circuit to avoid crosstalk effect, which is based on a programmable system-on-chip. The measurement of a single sensor shows that the full-scale range of detectable forces are about 20, 8, and 8 N for the _x_-, _y_-, and _z_-directions, respectively. The sensitivities of a cell measured with a current setup are 0.47, 0.45, and 0.16 mV/mN for the _x_-, _y_-, and _y_-directions, respectively. The sensor showed a high repeatability, low hysteresis, and minimum tactile crosstalk. The proposed flexible three-axial tactile sensor array can be applied in a curved or compliant surface that requires slip detection and flexibility, such as a robotic finger.

  • Experimental extraction of tactile sensor specifications for a minimal anthropomorphic robot hand

    In this work a new approach is taken towards determining the quantified contribution of tactile acuity to human manual dexterity, and the implications of this approach when applied to the development of artificial fingertip touch sensors for humanoid robots or for prosthetic hands. The interdependence between several dimensions of both tactile acuity and dexterity is investigated. An experimental study was performed on a carefully chosen sample of 30 human subjects, with data acquisition taking place over a total period of 35 hours of testing in a controlled environment. The data were analyzed to extract minimum levels of tactile acuity that would result in manual dexterity performance at 80% of normal. These extracted levels are interpreted to represent minimum specifications for the design of an artificial tactile sensor that would endow a robot hand with acceptable dexterity, and are used in a case study to drive the conceptual design process for a new tactile sensor based on quantum tunneling composite material.



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