Conferences related to Cyberwarfare

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2020 IEEE 23rd International Conference on Information Fusion (FUSION)

The International Conference on Information Fusion is the premier forum for interchange of the latest research in data and information fusion, and its impacts on our society. The conference brings together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to report on the latest scientific and technical advances.


2018 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS)

ISTAS is a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary forum for engineers, policy makers, entrepreneurs, philosophers, researchers, social scientists, technologists, and polymaths to collaborate, exchange experiences, and discuss the social implications of technology.


2015 IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence for Security and Defense Applications (CISDA)

The purpose of the symposium is to present current efforts pursuing theoretical and applied methods in computational intelligence related to security and defense problems.



Periodicals related to Cyberwarfare

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Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE

Each tutorial reviews currents communications topics in network management and computer and wireless communications. Available tutorials, which are 2.5 to 5 hours in length contains the original visuals and voice-over by the presenter. IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials features two distinct types of articles: original articles and reprints. The original articles are exclusively written for IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Education, IEEE Transactions on

Educational methods, technology, and programs; history of technology; impact of evolving research on education.


Internet Computing, IEEE

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications. The magazine targets the technical and scientific Internet user communities as well as designers and developers of Internet-based applications and enabling technologies. IC publishes refereed articles on the latest developments and key trends in Internet technologies and applications. A crossroads between academic researchers and ...


IT Professional

This IEEE Computer Society periodical covers the many rapidly emerging issues facing information technology professionals, developers, and managers of enterprise information systems. IT Professional's coverage areas include: Web services, Internet security, data management; enterprise architectures and infrastructures; organizing and utilizing data; instituting cross-functional systems; using IT for competitive breakthroughs; integrating systems and capitalizing on IT advances; emerging technologies like electronic ...


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Most published Xplore authors for Cyberwarfare

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Xplore Articles related to Cyberwarfare

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Cyberwarfare and Digital Governance

IEEE Internet Computing, 2017

Dyn suffered multiple complex DDoS attacks in October 2016, constituting one of the largest cyberattacks of this nature ever documented. With this and other recent events in mind, the authors discuss conceptual and practical challenges around cyberwarfare and its impact on cyberspace governance.


Cyberwarfare: Western and Chinese Allegations

IT Professional, 2014

A large proportion of China-originated cyberattacks are allegedly aimed at extracting high-value intellectual property such as trade secrets. Senior government officials from China and the US have made frequent verbal and written allegations that their countries are victimized by cyberattacks and that their counterparts in the other country don't cooperate in fighting cybercrimes. This paper sheds light into this cyber ...


Stuxnet: Dissecting a Cyberwarfare Weapon

IEEE Security & Privacy, 2011

Last year marked a turning point in the history of cybersecurity-the arrival of the first cyber warfare weapon ever, known as Stuxnet. Not only was Stuxnet much more complex than any other piece of malware seen before, it also followed a completely new approach that's no longer aligned with conven tional confidentiality, integrity, and availability thinking. Con trary to initial ...


Cybermilitias and Political Hackers: Use of Irregular Forces in Cyberwarfare

IEEE Security & Privacy, 2011

Recent cyberattacks have grayed the line between political hacker and legitimate combatant. This article explores the possible benefits and drawbacks of cyberconflict and the ramifications of cybermilitias.


Introduction to CyberWarfare: Offensive and Defensive Software Technologies Minitrack

2015 48th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2015

This new Minitrack, CyberWarfare: Offensive and Defensive Software Technologies, is intended to bring together technical and non-technical cyberwarfare researchers, academics, and practitioners in related fields to discuss the mechanics and implications of offensive and defensive cyberwarfare activities. While the breadth of this field is extensive, the focus topics for the inaugural offering of this minitrack include offensive and defensive technologies ...


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Educational Resources on Cyberwarfare

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IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Cyberwarfare"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Cyberwarfare and Digital Governance

    Dyn suffered multiple complex DDoS attacks in October 2016, constituting one of the largest cyberattacks of this nature ever documented. With this and other recent events in mind, the authors discuss conceptual and practical challenges around cyberwarfare and its impact on cyberspace governance.

  • Cyberwarfare: Western and Chinese Allegations

    A large proportion of China-originated cyberattacks are allegedly aimed at extracting high-value intellectual property such as trade secrets. Senior government officials from China and the US have made frequent verbal and written allegations that their countries are victimized by cyberattacks and that their counterparts in the other country don't cooperate in fighting cybercrimes. This paper sheds light into this cyber Cold war by examining Western and Chinese allegations and counter-allegations related to cyberattacks and cyberwarfare.

  • Stuxnet: Dissecting a Cyberwarfare Weapon

    Last year marked a turning point in the history of cybersecurity-the arrival of the first cyber warfare weapon ever, known as Stuxnet. Not only was Stuxnet much more complex than any other piece of malware seen before, it also followed a completely new approach that's no longer aligned with conven tional confidentiality, integrity, and availability thinking. Con trary to initial belief, Stuxnet wasn't about industrial espionage: it didn't steal, manipulate, or erase information. Rather, Stuxnet's goal was to physically destroy a military target-not just meta phorically, but literally. Let's see how this was done.

  • Cybermilitias and Political Hackers: Use of Irregular Forces in Cyberwarfare

    Recent cyberattacks have grayed the line between political hacker and legitimate combatant. This article explores the possible benefits and drawbacks of cyberconflict and the ramifications of cybermilitias.

  • Introduction to CyberWarfare: Offensive and Defensive Software Technologies Minitrack

    This new Minitrack, CyberWarfare:  Offensive and Defensive Software Technologies, is intended to bring together technical and non-technical cyberwarfare researchers, academics, and practitioners in related fields to discuss the mechanics and implications of offensive and defensive cyberwarfare activities.  While the breadth of this field is extensive, the focus topics for the inaugural offering of this minitrack include offensive and defensive technologies and capabilities, impacts of cyberwarfare, information warfare, collateral damage from related activities, as well as educational, legal, policy and ethical issues associated with the controversial topic.

  • Cyberwarfare seen through a mariner's spyglass

    The Internet has become an essential tool in the everyday conduct of commercial life and its security has become a topic of growing importance since 9/11. The ability of terrorists to conduct cyberwarfare is largely unknown, but the potential for the disruption of life worries many policymakers. In searching for precedent to anticipate the potential impact of a cyberwar, it is important to identify modes of conflict that are useful against asymmetrically matched opponents and conflict that strikes at the economy. The author suggests that an effective model for looking at cyberwarfare is that of maritime "guerre de course" or commerce warfare. Moreover, the maritime paradigm provides a useful dialog with which to examine possible future trends in cyberwarfare beyond effects including the impact of technological innovation, sociological and historical trends, and tactics.

  • Principles of Cyberwarfare

    The principles of kinetic warfare are well documented, but are not always applicable to cyberwarfare. Differences between cyberspace and the real world suggest some additional principles. This article proposes some principles of cyberwarfare. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list but rather suggestions leading toward discussion and dialogue.

  • Information Warfare Amplified by Cyberwarfare and Hacking the National Knowledge Infrastructure

    This paper describes how information warfare (IW) is now being carried on the back of cyber warfare (CW). IW is thus amplified so attacks may be deeper, broader, faster, more specific, or more directly causal than in the past. The paper argues that instead of hacking an electrical grid or transportation system, disrupting operations, the new IW-on-CW strategy is a hacking of the knowledge infrastructure (KI). Causing an election-day logistics problem or spreading fake news puts the national knowledge infrastructure at risk. Cyber attack on cyber-physical (CP) information infrastructure (II) is traditionally biased toward the command and control of physical infrastructure. IW traditionally considers scales of time and reach appropriate to pre-internet propagation and points of failure. Critical infrastructure is considered to be power, transportation, food, water, shelter, security, and emergency response, but also (CP) communications, (KI) banking, and now, elections, news, and social media (all KI). The next targets of national knowledge industries might be institutional or industry-wide, including engineering, education, medicine, surveillance, monitoring, investment, advertising, entertainment, and law, with new, heretofore unseen time scales. Knowledge hacking has evolved because pathways are controllable, not just perimeters breachable. IW-on-CW is made possible by the largely voluntary surrender of epistemological checks and balances to the conveniences of cyberspace. Defenses are within the control of a vigilant population that resists trading vulnerability for convenience.

  • Case study: Developing an intranet Web site for information security: The evolution of a corporate intranet Web site in the age of cyberwarfare

    Collaboration technologies bring unprecedented opportunities to accelerate innovation across teams, companies, and international borders. Ironically, these same technologies also provide unprecedented opportunities for malicious intrusions and information espionage. As a result, mitigating tools, processes, and policies are being deployed to protect vital corporate resources. These tools can be complex and changeable, and can result in lost productivity when end users are unable to easily use them to do their daily jobs. In this case study, a legacy corporate intranet Web site must undergo a difficult transition in content, technology, and governance before it can meet the new demands of instructing a global workforce about information security practices and requirements.

  • Distributed collaboration foundation

    The formalization of network centric warfare (NCW) signaled a new Department of Defense drive towards systems that could conceivably interact towards the accomplishment of a common goal. But the debate regarding NCW possibilities and practicalities in terms of existing and potential technologies highlight that much work is needed before the theortical NCW can be realized. The Information and Cyberwarfare Technology Center (ICTC) initiated the Distributed Sensor Web (DSW) independent research and development project to provide the war fighter with more realtime and accurate situational awarenessin today's dynamic, fast-paced operational environment. To facilitate the proposed degree of autonomous collaboration the Distributed Collaboration Foundation (DCF) was developed to enable large and small scale federation autonomous collaboration and adapation. Existing distributed approaches based on intelligent software agents and service-oriented architectures (SOA) provide reasonable foundations for distribution and operation of software components along with data exchanges but they do not provide a mechanism that supports component interaction in terms of decision making towards accomplishment of a common goal or adaptation. The DCF uses belief network models to represent the known and "uncertain" aspects of mission operational criteria and the respective operational environment.



Standards related to Cyberwarfare

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Jobs related to Cyberwarfare

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