Sleep

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Sleep is a naturally recurring state characterized by reduced or absent consciousness, relatively suspended sensory activity, and inactivity of nearly all voluntary muscles. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Sleep

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2023 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Conference (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and invitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields of biomedical engineering.Submitted full papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality papers will be presented in oral and poster sessions,will appear in the Conference Proceedings and will be indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE.


ICC 2021 - IEEE International Conference on Communications

IEEE ICC is one of the two flagship IEEE conferences in the field of communications; Montreal is to host this conference in 2021. Each annual IEEE ICC conference typically attracts approximately 1,500-2,000 attendees, and will present over 1,000 research works over its duration. As well as being an opportunity to share pioneering research ideas and developments, the conference is also an excellent networking and publicity event, giving the opportunity for businesses and clients to link together, and presenting the scope for companies to publicize themselves and their products among the leaders of communications industries from all over the world.


2020 59th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)

The CDC is the premier conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of systems and control. The CDC annually brings together an international community of researchers and practitioners in the field of automatic control to discuss new research results, perspectives on future developments, and innovative applications relevant to decision making, automatic control, and related areas.


2020 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP)

The International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), sponsored by the IEEE SignalProcessing Society, is the premier forum for the presentation of technological advances andresearch results in the fields of theoretical, experimental, and applied image and videoprocessing. ICIP 2020, the 27th in the series that has been held annually since 1994, bringstogether leading engineers and scientists in image and video processing from around the world.


2020 IEEE International Solid- State Circuits Conference - (ISSCC)

ISSCC is the foremost global forum for solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip. The Conference offers 5 days of technical papers and educational events related to integrated circuits, including analog, digital, data converters, memory, RF, communications, imagers, medical and MEMS ICs.


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Periodicals related to Sleep

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


Communications Letters, IEEE

Covers topics in the scope of IEEE Transactions on Communications but in the form of very brief publication (maximum of 6column lengths, including all diagrams and tables.)


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Xplore Articles related to Sleep

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Out of Touch : From audio recordings to phone apps to mattress sensors, noncontact systems offer a less cumbersome way to monitor sleep.

IEEE Pulse, 2014

The impact of poor and disrupted sleep on an individual is significant, affecting the quality of life physiologically, psychologically, and financially. It is estimated that a large population of people who suffer from sleep disorders is unaware of the condition and remains undiagnosed [1], creating a need (and desire) to self-monitor. However, sleep screening is generally cumbersome and complex, requiring ...


Wireless Sleep Measurement: Sensing sleep and breathing patterns using radio-frequency sensors.

IEEE Pulse, 2014

Despite the fact that we spend nearly one third of our lives asleep, surprisingly little was known about sleep until the 20th century. Now, sleep medicine is firmly established as a significant branch of medical practice, taking its roots strongly from the work of Nathaniel Kleitman and colleagues at the University of Chicago in the 1950s. They were the first ...


Pediatric Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders: Advances in imaging and computational modeling.

IEEE Pulse, 2014

We understand now that sleep of sufficient length and quality is required for good health. This is particularly true for infants and children, who have the added physiologic task of growth and development, as compared to their adult counterparts. Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) are common in childhood and if unrecognized and not treated can result in significant morbidity. For example, ...


Seeing Sleep: Dynamic imaging of upper airway collapse and collapsibility in children.

IEEE Pulse, 2014

Sleep disordered breathing in children ranges from snoring, which has a prevalence of 12%, to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, which has a prevalence of 2-3% in the general population [1]. The underlying causes of pediatric OSA are extremely complex. There are bony structural influences, as seen in craniofacial abnormalities, and soft tissue abnormalities, such as a large tongue, redundant ...


Data-Driven Phenotyping : Graphical models for model-based phenotyping of sleep apnea.

IEEE Pulse, 2014

Sleep apnea is a multifactorial disease with a complex underlying physiology, which includes the chemoreflex feedback loop controlling ventilation. The instability of this feedback loop is one of the key factors contributing to a number of sleep disorders, including Cheyne?Stokes respiration and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A major limitation of the conventional characterization of this feedback loop is the need ...


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Educational Resources on Sleep

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Out of Touch : From audio recordings to phone apps to mattress sensors, noncontact systems offer a less cumbersome way to monitor sleep.

    The impact of poor and disrupted sleep on an individual is significant, affecting the quality of life physiologically, psychologically, and financially. It is estimated that a large population of people who suffer from sleep disorders is unaware of the condition and remains undiagnosed [1], creating a need (and desire) to self-monitor. However, sleep screening is generally cumbersome and complex, requiring multiple wearable sensors (and associated wires) and experts to interpret the large volumes of data.

  • Wireless Sleep Measurement: Sensing sleep and breathing patterns using radio-frequency sensors.

    Despite the fact that we spend nearly one third of our lives asleep, surprisingly little was known about sleep until the 20th century. Now, sleep medicine is firmly established as a significant branch of medical practice, taking its roots strongly from the work of Nathaniel Kleitman and colleagues at the University of Chicago in the 1950s. They were the first to show the existence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep?commonly associated with ?dreaming?and began the process of opening our eyes to the complex physiological processes that occur during sleep.

  • Pediatric Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders: Advances in imaging and computational modeling.

    We understand now that sleep of sufficient length and quality is required for good health. This is particularly true for infants and children, who have the added physiologic task of growth and development, as compared to their adult counterparts. Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) are common in childhood and if unrecognized and not treated can result in significant morbidity. For example, children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can exhibit behavioral, mood, and learning difficulties. If left untreated, alterations in the function of the autonomic nervous system and a chronic inflammatory state result, contributing to the risk of heart disease, stroke, glucose intolerance, and hypertension in adulthood.

  • Seeing Sleep: Dynamic imaging of upper airway collapse and collapsibility in children.

    Sleep disordered breathing in children ranges from snoring, which has a prevalence of 12%, to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, which has a prevalence of 2-3% in the general population [1]. The underlying causes of pediatric OSA are extremely complex. There are bony structural influences, as seen in craniofacial abnormalities, and soft tissue abnormalities, such as a large tongue, redundant soft tissue, or compliance/collapsibility issues. In some groups, such as those with Down syndrome, a combination of these factors comes into play.

  • Data-Driven Phenotyping : Graphical models for model-based phenotyping of sleep apnea.

    Sleep apnea is a multifactorial disease with a complex underlying physiology, which includes the chemoreflex feedback loop controlling ventilation. The instability of this feedback loop is one of the key factors contributing to a number of sleep disorders, including Cheyne?Stokes respiration and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A major limitation of the conventional characterization of this feedback loop is the need for labor-intensive and technically challenging experiments. In recent years, a number of techniques that bring together concepts from signal processing, control theory, and machine learning have proven effective for estimating the overall loop gain of the respiratory control system (see Figure 1) and its major components, chemoreflex gain and plant gain, from noninvasive time-series measurements of ventilation and blood gases. The purpose of this article is to review the existing model-based techniques for phenotyping of sleep apnea, and some of the emerging methodologies, under a unified modeling framework known as graphical models. The hope is that the graphical model perspective provides insight into the future development of techniques for model-based phenotyping. Ultimately, such approaches have major clinical relevance since strategies to manipulate physiological parameters may improve sleep apnea severity. For example, oxygen therapy or drugs such as acetazolamide may be used to reduce chemoreflex gain, which may improve sleep apnea in selected patients.

  • Engineering Sleep Disorders: From classical CPAP devices toward new intelligent adaptive ventilatory therapy.

    Among the most common sleep disorders are those related to disruptions in airflow (apnea) or reductions in the breath amplitude (hypopnea) with or without obstruction of the upper airway (UA). One of the most important sleep disorders is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This sleep-?disordered breathing, quantified by the apnea??hypopnea index (AHI), can produce a significant reduction of oxygen saturation and an abnormal elevation of carbon dioxide levels in the blood. Apnea and hypopnea episodes are associated with arousals and sleep fragmentation during the night and compensatory response of the autonomic nervous system.

  • Sleep on It: Sleep might just be the most important part of daily health—and the biggest new target for biomedical engineering.

    Every night, around the world, 7 billion people lie down to sleep. Their eyes close, their bodies relax, and their brain waves begin to smooth from the chaos of wakefulness into slower, synchronized waves. As their thoughts begin to lose coherence, a part of the brain called the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, located deep behind the eyes, begins to blanket the nervous system in quieting chemicals like gamma-aminobutyric acid and galanin, shutting down the networks of wakefulness and turning off the body?s awareness of the world around it. It is the most important part of these people?s days.

  • Polysomnography: Understanding this technology's past might guide future developments.

    Hans Berger published the first human electroencephalograph (EEG) recording in 1924 [1]. He used a device called the string galvanometer to record brain waves on a light-sensitive plate. The fluctuating potential difference from the scalp oscillated at eight to 13 cycles per second (alpha rhythm) when an individual closed his or her eyes and remained relaxed but awake. Berger noted that when a person fell asleep, the alpha rhythm disappeared. Amazingly, to this day, the alpha rhythm disappearance remains the primary marker for defining sleep onset. Years later, Carl Ludwig invented a kymograph (the ?wave writer?) that used a stylus to record electroencephalographic oscillation on a rotating drum. Later, an alternative approach evolved so that the brain wave recordings were inked onto a roll or fan-folded continuous paper strip moving at a constant speed. Mechanical engineers gradually improved the drive mechanisms for moving paper by using rotating sprockets, pinch rollers, and pressure plates. Gear mechanisms were also incorporated to permit speed changes.

  • How's My Sleep?: Personal sleep trackers are gaining in popularity, but their accuracy is still open to debate.

    When it comes to health and fitness, there's an app for just about everything. Want to track how many steps you've taken today? There's an app for that. Want to track the calories you've consumed? There's an app for that, too. And, if you want to know if you got a good night's sleep last night, well, now there's also an app for that.

  • Are You in Bed with Technology?

    Good sleep can positively affect our performance, while a lack of sleep can affect our memory, immune system, cognitive functioning, learning abilities, and alertness. Researchers have thus investigated numerous technologies and approaches to monitor individuals' sleep behavior at home. One goal of such technologies is to collect information that can increase users' awareness of their sleep habits to persuade them to adopt healthier routines. This department looks at new products in this space, ranging from smart alarm clocks to advanced monitoring devices.



Standards related to Sleep

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Jobs related to Sleep

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