Conferences related to Implants

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2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 IEEE 46th Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC)

Photovoltaic materials, devices, systems and related science and technology


2019 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM)

the IEEE/IEDM has been the world's main forum for reporting breakthroughs in technology, design, manufacturing, physics and the modeling of semiconductors and other electronic devices. Topics range from deep submicron CMOS transistors and memories to novel displays and imagers, from compound semiconductor materials to nanotechnology devices and architectures, from micromachined devices to smart -power technologies, etc.


2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

The conference covers all aspects of the technology associated with ultrasound generation and detection and their applications.


2019 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC)

This conference is the annual premier meeting on the use of instrumentation in the Nuclear and Medical fields. The meeting has a very long history of providing an exciting venue for scientists to present their latest advances, exchange ideas, renew existing collaboration and form new ones. The NSS portion of the conference is an ideal forum for scientists and engineers in the field of Nuclear Science, radiation instrumentation, software engineering and data acquisition. The MIC is one of the most informative venues on the state-of-the art use of physics, engineering, and mathematics in Nuclear Medicine and related imaging modalities, such as CT and increasingly so MRI, through the development of hybrid devices


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Periodicals related to Implants

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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IEEE

IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWP Letters) will be devoted to the rapid electronic publication of short manuscripts in the technical areas of Antennas and Wireless Propagation.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in

The IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering will review the state-of-the-art and trends in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. This includes scholarly works, ranging from historic and modern development in biomedical engineering to the life sciences and medicine enabled by technologies covered by the various IEEE societies.


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Most published Xplore authors for Implants

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Xplore Articles related to Implants

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Cochlear and Brainstem Auditory Prostheses “Neural Interface for Hearing Restoration: Cochlear and Brain Stem Implants”

Proceedings of the IEEE, 2008

This paper discusses the development and implementation of three novel implantable technologies that have advanced the communication abilities of hearing-impaired individuals who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. This paper will discuss clinical indications and outcomes and include current technological limitations and future research efforts.


Characterization of surface-measured potentials from implanted cochlear protheses

Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Volume 13: 1991, 1991

None


Across-Frequency Delays Based on the Cochlear Traveling Wave: Enhanced Speech Presentation for Cochlear Implants

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 2010

Cochlear implants stimulate the auditory nerve with the outputs of a bank of narrow-band filters. We propose that cochlear implant users are better able to perceive speech when these frequency bands are desynchronized, as occurs in the normal cochlea. The first part of this study was a computational investigation of across-frequency delays on the stimulation patterns generated by the advanced ...


Tuning the Hopf Cochlea Towards Listening

NDES 2012; Nonlinear Dynamics of Electronic Systems, 2012

The Hopf Cochlea is a hard- and software implemented model of the mammalian cochlea that is constructed from a series of feedforward coupled nonlinear Hopf system amplifier sections. All salient nonlinear aspects of hearing can be traced back to the physical properties of the Hopf oscillators. At each location along the cochlea, the amplification strength is effectively governed by a ...


Unwrapping cochlear implants by spiral CT

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 1996

Multielectrode, intracochlear implants were designed for individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss who derive little or no benefit from acoustic hearing aids. Determination of each electrode's position in a patient's inner ear may improve speech processor programming to maximize speech recognition. In this paper, an approach is described to use as input a volumetric spiral computed tomography (CT) image of ...


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Educational Resources on Implants

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Cochlear and Brainstem Auditory Prostheses “Neural Interface for Hearing Restoration: Cochlear and Brain Stem Implants”

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of three novel implantable technologies that have advanced the communication abilities of hearing-impaired individuals who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. This paper will discuss clinical indications and outcomes and include current technological limitations and future research efforts.

  • Characterization of surface-measured potentials from implanted cochlear protheses

    None

  • Across-Frequency Delays Based on the Cochlear Traveling Wave: Enhanced Speech Presentation for Cochlear Implants

    Cochlear implants stimulate the auditory nerve with the outputs of a bank of narrow-band filters. We propose that cochlear implant users are better able to perceive speech when these frequency bands are desynchronized, as occurs in the normal cochlea. The first part of this study was a computational investigation of across-frequency delays on the stimulation patterns generated by the advanced combination encoder (ACE) sound-processing strategy. By offsetting frequency bands from each other, fewer stimuli were discarded from voiced speech by maxima selection. Background noise, however, was not affected in this way. The second part of this study was an assessment of speech perception with across-frequency delays in cochlear implant users with the ACE strategy. In the perception of sentences in noise, three subjects improved with delays, four showed no change and one was worse. For words in quiet, four subjects had improved word recognition and four showed no change. A significant group improvement (P<0.05) was seen for speech in quiet. These results are encouraging for cochlear implant sound processing because across- frequency delays can be incorporated easily and efficiently into existing sound-processing strategies.

  • Tuning the Hopf Cochlea Towards Listening

    The Hopf Cochlea is a hard- and software implemented model of the mammalian cochlea that is constructed from a series of feedforward coupled nonlinear Hopf system amplifier sections. All salient nonlinear aspects of hearing can be traced back to the physical properties of the Hopf oscillators. At each location along the cochlea, the amplification strength is effectively governed by a single real parameter characterizing the distance of the Hopf oscillator from the Hopf-bifurcation point. Using these parameters, given a mixture of input signals (e.g., a set of musical instruments) it should be possible to tune the cochlea towards a single sound component. Introducing an autocorrelation-based tuning measure, we demonstrate the tunability of the Hopf Cochlea on recorded real-life instruments of different timbres and pitches. Despite the strongly nonlinear and therefore interaction-prone nature of the device, strong and simple tuning patterns permit an easy tuning to sounds of varying pitch.

  • Unwrapping cochlear implants by spiral CT

    Multielectrode, intracochlear implants were designed for individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss who derive little or no benefit from acoustic hearing aids. Determination of each electrode's position in a patient's inner ear may improve speech processor programming to maximize speech recognition. In this paper, an approach is described to use as input a volumetric spiral computed tomography (CT) image of the Nucleus electrode array (Cochlear Pty. Ltd, Lane Cove, NSW, Australia) to unwrap it, and to measure its implanted length given starting and end points. Representative curvilinear structures were digitally synthesized in image volumes of isotropic 0.1-mm voxels. The electrode array was spirally CT-scanned in vitro and in vivo, and reconstructed on an isotropic grid in 0.1-mm steps. Two algorithms were constructed to track and measure these curvilinear structures. The first algorithm is Karhunen-Loeve (K-L)-transform based, in which the K-L transform is locally applied at a current main aids position to determine the eigenvectors of the main axis voxels, the next main axis position is estimated from the current position along the principal eigendirection, adjusted to the mass center of the orthogonal cross section passing through the estimated position, and then scaled to have a prespecified step. The second algorithm is similar to the first one but avoids use of the K-L transform, in the second algorithm, the next position is directly estimated along the local direction and then processed with the same correction and scaling operations. With user- specified starting and end points as well. As a local direction at the starting point, a curvilinear structure can be automatically tracked using either of the algorithms. The first algorithm is more robust, while the second one is more efficient. In the numerical and in vitro studies, the lengths of the curvilinear structures were accurately measured. Given local directions determined in the tracking process, an electrode array image can be unwrapped into a linear array with the central electrode axis as the abscissa. The unwrapping approach allows longitudinally and cross-sectionally accurate measurement and better visualization of cochlear implant images. With preimplantation knowledge of length, width, and center electrode distance, the position of individual electrodes can be estimated after unwrapping.

  • Interfacing Sensors With the Nervous System: Lessons From the Development and Success of the Cochlear Implant

    The cochlear implant is the most successful neural prosthesis to date and may serve as a paradigm for the development or further development of other systems to interface sensors with the nervous system, e.g., visual or vestibular prostheses. This paper traces the history of cochlear implants and describes how the current levels of performance have been achieved. Lessons and insights from this experience are presented in concluding sections.

  • Implantable RFID sensor platform to monitor vital functions of small animals controlled by network based software

    Remote measurement of the physiology, so-called biotelemetry, is a key technology in the modern veterinary medicine. The usage of wireless implants has less impact on the behavior of animals than manual measurement methods and cause less disturbance than wired devices. But, common biotelemetry still uses proprietary communication and power concepts focused on small systems with one animal. Therefore, the University of Applied Sciences Offenburg is developing a low-cost RFID system called muTrans1, which is able to measure ECG, pressure, temperature, oxygen saturation and activity. The muTrans uses an own RFID sensor transponder and standardized commercial components and combines them to a scalable RFID system able to build-up RFID sensor networks with a nearly unlimited size.

  • Buried injector logic: Second generation I<sup>2</sup>L performance

    A vertically structured I2L gate, integrated with linear SBC processing, will be discussed. Previous (standard I2L) logic/linear function conflicts stemming from structural constraints have been reconciled, demonstrating second generation I2L performance with unrestrained SBC capability.

  • Physiologically based analysis of cochlear implant representations

    A method is presented for analyzing cochlear implant stimulations and typical representations used in simulations. Filtered "white-noise" bands are modulated using sinusoids, representing differing stimulation channels. These representations, along with their corresponding envelopes, are used to generate neural activation patterns (NAPs), which represent "normal-hearing" responses In the auditory nerve to these stimuli. Additionally, NAPs are generated to represent the neural activity induced by cochlear implant stimulation strategies, assuming exponential rolloff from the electrodes. The mean squared error is measured between NAPs both directly, and after compensation for perceptual resolution. Results suggest that the noise-band approximation of the CIS implant signal actually has more in common with the original source than with the implant stimulation patterns.

  • Psychophysical Evaluation of An Ultra-Low Power, Analog Biomimetic Cochlear Implant Processor Filterbank Architecture With Across Channels AGC

    This paper evaluated psychophysically an ultra-low-power, analog biomimetic cochlear-implant (CI) processor filterbank architecture, which was recently proposed and demonstrated in hardware. The architecture/strategy emulates the lateral inhibition (LI) mechanism by employing an automatic gain control (AGC) scheme that is coupled across One-Zero-Gammatone-Filter (OZGF) channels. The OZGF filtering and the coupled channel AGC were tested respectively in two experiments, where normal-hearing listeners were required to listen to sentences and recognise key words therein. The sentences were mixed with a steady background noise at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of -6, -3 and 0 dB, and processed through a noise-excited envelope vocoder serving as the acoustic simulator of cochlear implants. In the first experiment, the OZGF filtering was compared with cascaded bandpass biquad filtering employed in recent attempts towards fully-implantable CI processing, in terms of the resulting intelligibility. The results showed that the sharply tuned OZGF response did not degrade intelligibility despite the very limited number (16) of channels used. In the second experiment, the sentences were processed in two multi- channel compression systems, one with the channel AGC coupled, whilst another uncoupled. The results showed that the AGC-coupled system was significantly advantageous, and the improvement averaged across the SNRs is 31 percentage points. Furthermore, this compressive system results in no significant decrease in intelligibility when compared to the linear filtering systems investigated in the first experiment. Thus, the coupled channel AGC may be considered as a potential solution to the limited spectral contrast of current CI systems, which may partially account for their noise-susceptibility.



Standards related to Implants

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IEEE Standard for Safety Levels With Respect to Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields, 0-3 kHz

Develop safety levels for human exposure to electromagnetic fields from 0 to 3kHz. This standard will be based on the results of an evaluation of the relevant scientific literature and proven effects which are well established and for which thresholds of reaction are understood. Field limits will be derived from threshold current densities or internal electric fields.