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Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Contains articles on the applications and other relevant technology. Electronic applications include analog and digital circuits employing thin films and active devices such as Josephson junctions. Power applications include magnet design as well asmotors, generators, and power transmission


Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Video A/D and D/A, display technology, image analysis and processing, video signal characterization and representation, video compression techniques and signal processing, multidimensional filters and transforms, analog video signal processing, neural networks for video applications, nonlinear video signal processing, video storage and retrieval, computer vision, packet video, high-speed real-time circuits, VLSI architecture and implementation for video technology, multiprocessor systems--hardware and software-- ...


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A Low-Voltage CMOS Rectifier with On-Chip Matching Network and a Magnetic Field Focused Antenna for Wirelessly Powered Medical Implants

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, None

In this work, we present a CMOS rectifier and its associated external transmitting antenna that are designed for wirelessly powered implantable devices in general, and for a smart medical stent interface, in particular. The detailed characterization and modelling procedures of the "smart stent'' implant are presented, and the extracted circuit model of the stent is used for stent-rectifier co-optimization. A ...


Correction to “Feedback Analysis and Design of RF Power Links for Low-Power Bionic Systems” [Mar 07 28-38]

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2014

We report on corrections to two equations in a paper authored by two of us (M.W. Baker and R. Sarpeshkar, see ibid., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 28-38, Mar. 2007). These corrections were discovered and graciously pointed out by two authors of this manuscript (M. Gasulla and J. Albesa). These corrections generate a more accurate set of equations that do ...


Correction to “Dielectrophoresis-Based Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Nano and Micro-Particles Manipulation and Capacitive Detection” [Apr 12 120-132]

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2013

In the above paper (ibid., vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 120-132, Apr. 2012), the list of authors is incomplete. The complete list of authors is as follows: Mohamed Amine Miled, Genevieve Massicotte, and Mohamad Sawan.


Spiking Neuron Computation With the Time Machine

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2012

The Time Machine (TM) is a spike-based computation architecture that represents synaptic weights in time. This choice of weight representation allows the use of virtual synapses, providing an excellent tradeoff in terms of flexibility, arbitrary weight connections and hardware usage compared to dedicated synapse architectures. The TM supports an arbitrary number of synapses and is limited only by the number ...


Design and Development of Low-Loss Transformer for Powering Small Implantable Medical Devices

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, 2010

Small implantable medical devices, such as wireless capsule endoscopes, that can be swallowed have previously been developed. However, these devices cannot continuously operate for more than 8 h because of battery limitations; moreover, additional functionalities cannot be introduced. This paper proposes a design method for a high-efficiency energy transmission transformer (ETT) that can transmit energy transcutaneously to small implantable medical ...


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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • A Low-Voltage CMOS Rectifier with On-Chip Matching Network and a Magnetic Field Focused Antenna for Wirelessly Powered Medical Implants

    In this work, we present a CMOS rectifier and its associated external transmitting antenna that are designed for wirelessly powered implantable devices in general, and for a smart medical stent interface, in particular. The detailed characterization and modelling procedures of the "smart stent'' implant are presented, and the extracted circuit model of the stent is used for stent-rectifier co-optimization. A fully on-chip transformer-based tunable matching network is co-designed with the differential cross-coupled rectifier. At the external side, a four-port driven antenna is designed to focus the magnetic field in tissue as well as enhance the power density around the implant. As a proof-of-concept, the rectifier is fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process and the measurement results show that it can generate more than 500 mV DC voltage on a 2 kΩ load when the available power of the stent is greater than -2 dBm, corresponding to 34% power conversion efficiency (PCE). Finally, the “smart stent” system is tested in-vitro. The results of the wireless power transfer experiments show that with 480 mW transmitting power and 53 mm separation distance (including 33 mm phantom tissue), more than 350 μW is delivered to the rectifier's 2 kΩ load.

  • Correction to “Feedback Analysis and Design of RF Power Links for Low-Power Bionic Systems” [Mar 07 28-38]

    We report on corrections to two equations in a paper authored by two of us (M.W. Baker and R. Sarpeshkar, see ibid., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 28-38, Mar. 2007). These corrections were discovered and graciously pointed out by two authors of this manuscript (M. Gasulla and J. Albesa). These corrections generate a more accurate set of equations that do not make approximations made in the original paper. The approximations to the equations do not impact fits to experimental data presented in the original paper, which continue to remain excellent: The experimental data in the original paper were obtained for typical near-field RF power links used in bionic implants where the accurate and approximate equations yield nearly identical results. However, in other experimental systems, the more accurate expressions derived by M. Gasulla and J. Albesa should be used.

  • Correction to “Dielectrophoresis-Based Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Nano and Micro-Particles Manipulation and Capacitive Detection” [Apr 12 120-132]

    In the above paper (ibid., vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 120-132, Apr. 2012), the list of authors is incomplete. The complete list of authors is as follows: Mohamed Amine Miled, Genevieve Massicotte, and Mohamad Sawan.

  • Spiking Neuron Computation With the Time Machine

    The Time Machine (TM) is a spike-based computation architecture that represents synaptic weights in time. This choice of weight representation allows the use of virtual synapses, providing an excellent tradeoff in terms of flexibility, arbitrary weight connections and hardware usage compared to dedicated synapse architectures. The TM supports an arbitrary number of synapses and is limited only by the number of simultaneously active synapses to each neuron. SpikeSim, a behavioral hardware simulator for the architecture, is described along with example algorithms for edge detection and objection recognition. The TM can implement traditional spike-based processing as well as recently developed time mode operations where step functions serve as the input and output of each neuron block. A custom hybrid digital/analog implementation and a fully digital realization of the TM are discussed. An analog chip with 32 neurons, 1024 synapses and an address event representation (AER) block has been fabricated in 0.5 μm technology. A fully digital field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based implementation of the architecture has 6,144 neurons and 100,352 simultaneously active synapses. Both implementations utilize a digital controller for routing spikes that can process up to 34 million synapses per second.

  • Design and Development of Low-Loss Transformer for Powering Small Implantable Medical Devices

    Small implantable medical devices, such as wireless capsule endoscopes, that can be swallowed have previously been developed. However, these devices cannot continuously operate for more than 8 h because of battery limitations; moreover, additional functionalities cannot be introduced. This paper proposes a design method for a high-efficiency energy transmission transformer (ETT) that can transmit energy transcutaneously to small implantable medical devices using electromagnetic induction. First, the authors propose an unconventional design method to develop such a high-efficiency ETT. This method can be readily used to calculate the exact transmission efficiency for changes in the material and design parameters (i.e., the magnetic material, transmission frequency, load resistance, etc.). Next, the ac-to-ac energy transmission efficiency is calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Then, suitable conditions for practical transmission are identified. A maximum efficiency of 33.1% can be obtained at a transmission frequency of 500 kHz and a receiving power of 100 mW for a receiving coil size of ¿5 mm × 20 mm. Future design optimization is possible by using this method.

  • An Address-Event Vision Sensor for Multiple Transient Object Detection

    We present a vision sensor chip designed to detect multiple transient objects - objects that either move or change in light intensity - and output their locations using address-event representation. The sensor uses a novel onset detector to detect transient objects and a dynamically-wired winner-takes-all circuit to group pixels and select the brightest pixel in each object. This paper describes the circuits and also presents measurements that characterize the performance of the sensor chip.

  • Correction to “Compact Nonlinear Model of an Implantable Electrode Array for Spinal Cord Stimulation” [Jun 14 382-390]

    Presents corrections to the paper, “Compact nonlinear model of an implantable electrode array for spinal cord stimulation (SCS),” (Scott, J. and Single, P.), Circuits Syst., vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 382–290, Jun. 2014.

  • Shape-Preserving Preprocessing for Human Pulse Signals Based on Adaptive Parameter Determination

    The use of the human pulse signal for medical diagnosis is a mainstay in the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. Computer processing of this signal may be used to automate diagnostic procedures and to reveal sources of information in the waveform that have been used by both eastern and western physicians for more than two millennia. A new method for preprocessing of the human pulse signal significantly improves feature extraction and classification of the waveform. Baseline distortion is first removed using the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) and cubic spline interpolation, then a novel filtering method removes the residual background noise. Filtering is implemented in two stages. In the initial pass, a majority of the noise is eliminated by an adaptive mean filter whose sliding window duration is selected automatically based on a chain code and the DT-CWT. In the second pass, residual high frequency noise is removed using the DT-CWT with a new threshold determination. Experimental results demonstrate effective removal of background disturbances with excellent preservation of pulse peak information essential for proper parametric representation and classification of the waveform.

  • Correction to “Statistically Reconstructed Multiplexing for Very Dense, High-Channel-Count Acquisition Systems” [Feb 18 13-23]

    Presents corrections to the paper, “Statistically reconstructed multiplexing for very dense, high-channel-count acquisition systems,” (Tsai, D., et al), IEEE Trans. Biomed. Circuits Syst., vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 13–23, Feb. 2018.

  • Practical Inductive Link Design for Biomedical Wireless Power Transfer: A Tutorial

    Wireless power transfer systems, particularly those based on inductive coupling, provide an increasingly attractive method to safely deliver power to biomedical implants. Although there exists a large body of literature describing the design of inductive links, it generally focuses on single aspects of the design process. There is a variety of approaches, some analytic, some numerical, each with benefits and drawbacks. As a result, undertaking a link design can be a difficult task, particularly for a newcomer to the subject. This tutorial paper reviews and collects the methods and equations that are required to design an inductive link for biomedical wireless power transfer, with a focus on practicality. It introduces and explains the published methods and principles relevant to all aspects of inductive link design, such that no specific prior knowledge of inductive link design is required. These methods are also combined into a software package (the Coupled Coil Configurator), to further simplify the design process. This software is demonstrated with a design example, to serve as a practical illustration.



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