Volcanic ash

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Volcanic ash consists of small tephra, which are bits of pulverized rock and glass created by volcanic eruptions, less than 2 millimetres (0.1 in) in diameter. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Volcanic ash

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IGARSS 2015 - 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

The Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields using conferences, education and other resources. Its fields of interest are the theory, concepts and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the remote sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space, as well as the processing, interpretation and dissemination of this information.


2008 Second Workshop on Use of Remote Sensing Techniques for Monitoring Volcanoes and Seismogenic Areas (USEReST)

To gather contributions on the experience of different groups (users and technology developers) in order to formulate technical and general requirements for future activities on Earth Observation based services. To provide a platform to exchange experience of integrating Earth Observation (EO) based information with traditional observation methods and models. The workshop will be organized in thematic sessions followed by round table discussions.



Periodicals related to Volcanic ash

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Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, IEEE

It is expected that GRS Letters will apply to a wide range of remote sensing activities looking to publish shorter, high-impact papers. Topics covered will remain within the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Societys field of interest: the theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and ...


Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.




Xplore Articles related to Volcanic ash

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Grand-scale Volcanism Past, Present, and Future in Yellowstone

Bob Christiansen 2007 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2007

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/04161269.png)


Satellite imagery for volcanic hazards mitigation

R. T. Helz; G. A. Ellrod; G. Wadge IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2002

As world population and urbanization increase, volcanoes pose an ever greater hazard to life, property, and infrastructure in volcanically active regions. The rise in air traffic world-wide increases the risk of encounters between airborne ash and aircraft, even at great distances from the source. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), an international association of civilian space agencies, seeks to ...


A multifrequency laboratory investigation of attenuation and scattering from volcanic ash clouds

J. W. Bredow; R. Porco; M. S. Dawson; C. L. Betty; S. Self; T. Thordarson IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 1995

Interest in remote monitoring of volcanic activity has increased in the last several years partly as a result of several powerful eruptions and partly as a result of satellite-borne spectrometers with thermal IR bands with which to monitor the physical makeup and effects of the volcanic inputs to the atmosphere. The authors consider the first wide-bandwidth laboratory experiments intended to ...


Model-Based Weather Radar Remote Sensing of Explosive Volcanic Ash Eruption

Frank Silvio Marzano; Sara Marchiotto; Christiane Textor; David J. Schneider IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2010

Microphysical and dynamical features of volcanic ash clouds can be quantitatively monitored by using ground-based microwave weather radars. These systems can provide data for determining the ash volume, total mass, and height of eruption clouds. In order to demonstrate the unique potential of this microwave active remote-sensing technique, the case study of the eruption of Augustine Volcano in Alaska in ...


Automatic monitoring of ash and meteorological clouds by Neural Networks

M. Picchiani; M. Chini; L. Merucci; S. Corradini; A. Piscini; F. Del Frate 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2015

Volcanic eruptions affect at different levels the population and economy of interested areas. Moreover, volcanic ash detection represents a key issue for aviation safety due to the harming effects on aircraft. For these reasons, an accurate and fast analysis of the data is needed to monitor the phenomena's evolution and to manage the risk mitigation phase. In this scenario, the ...


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Educational Resources on Volcanic ash

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eLearning

Grand-scale Volcanism Past, Present, and Future in Yellowstone

Bob Christiansen 2007 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2007

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/04161269.png)


Satellite imagery for volcanic hazards mitigation

R. T. Helz; G. A. Ellrod; G. Wadge IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2002

As world population and urbanization increase, volcanoes pose an ever greater hazard to life, property, and infrastructure in volcanically active regions. The rise in air traffic world-wide increases the risk of encounters between airborne ash and aircraft, even at great distances from the source. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), an international association of civilian space agencies, seeks to ...


A multifrequency laboratory investigation of attenuation and scattering from volcanic ash clouds

J. W. Bredow; R. Porco; M. S. Dawson; C. L. Betty; S. Self; T. Thordarson IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 1995

Interest in remote monitoring of volcanic activity has increased in the last several years partly as a result of several powerful eruptions and partly as a result of satellite-borne spectrometers with thermal IR bands with which to monitor the physical makeup and effects of the volcanic inputs to the atmosphere. The authors consider the first wide-bandwidth laboratory experiments intended to ...


Model-Based Weather Radar Remote Sensing of Explosive Volcanic Ash Eruption

Frank Silvio Marzano; Sara Marchiotto; Christiane Textor; David J. Schneider IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 2010

Microphysical and dynamical features of volcanic ash clouds can be quantitatively monitored by using ground-based microwave weather radars. These systems can provide data for determining the ash volume, total mass, and height of eruption clouds. In order to demonstrate the unique potential of this microwave active remote-sensing technique, the case study of the eruption of Augustine Volcano in Alaska in ...


Automatic monitoring of ash and meteorological clouds by Neural Networks

M. Picchiani; M. Chini; L. Merucci; S. Corradini; A. Piscini; F. Del Frate 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2015

Volcanic eruptions affect at different levels the population and economy of interested areas. Moreover, volcanic ash detection represents a key issue for aviation safety due to the harming effects on aircraft. For these reasons, an accurate and fast analysis of the data is needed to monitor the phenomena's evolution and to manage the risk mitigation phase. In this scenario, the ...


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