Conferences related to Thermostats

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2013 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

SIEDS is a student focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and masters graduate design projects or design oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.

  • 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The Symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and Master's graduate design projects, such as those from capstone design courses or from baccalaureate, honors, or design-oriented graduate theses.

  • 2011 Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and masters graduate design projects or design-oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.

  • 2010 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and master's graduate design projects or design-oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.


2012 47th International Universities Power Engineering Conference (UPEC)

A major international forum for the presentation, discussion and exchange of information concerning new trends in electrical power engineering. To become better informed about the latest developments in the field of power engineering.

  • 2010 45th International Universities Power Engineering Conference (UPEC)

    The global energy challenge, the ageing of electrical networks in industrial countries, and the extension of the grids in developing countries require significant research effort and the need for talented engineers and innovators is critical to the electrical energy industry. UPEC is an ideal forum to address such issues, and to network and meet experts in these areas


TRANSDUCERS 2011 - 2011 16th International Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Conference

Latest progress in physical, chemical and biological microsensors; Latest development in optical, RF, fluidic, biomedical and power MEMS; Most advanced technologies in micro/nano fabrication, packaging and design.


2008 International Conference Modern Technique and Technologies - (MTT 2008)

Geographical scope: Russia, Romania, Spain, Czech, Slovenia, Kazakhstan, Kirghiziya etc. Scientific scope: power industry, instrument-making, machine-building: technology, equipment and automation, electromechanics, medical devices and tools, material science, informatics and control in engineering systems, modern physical methods in science amd engineering, quality management control, heat and power engineering, material art processing design and technology.

  • 2005 International Conference Modern Technique and Technologies - (MTT 2005)



Periodicals related to Thermostats

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Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

The development and application of electric systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; the encouragement of energy conservation; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices.




Xplore Articles related to Thermostats

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Agents for distributed decision-making

S. Talukdar 2003 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37491), 2003

Agents are modules from which problem solving can be built. Structurally, an agent is a bundle of sensors, decision-makers and actuators; behaviorally, an agent is a mapping from an in-space (all the things the agent can sense) to an out-space (all things the agent can affect). Agents can be simple or compound. More specifically, lesser agents can be organized into ...


Challenges in utilisation of demand side response for operating reserve provision

Hassan W. Qazi; Daniel J. Burke; Damian Flynn IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies, Europe, 2014

Utilisation of flexible demand to provide contingency reserves is generally considered beneficial to power systems, and can be a key enabler for ambitious renewable energy penetrations. Detailed techno-economic analysis of reserve provision from flexible demand is considered in this paper. A unit commitment/economic dispatch problem is set up that recognises demand side response (DSR) as a source of primary operating ...


Low Voltage Motor Control Centers Utilizing Microprocessor Technology

D. G. Loucks IEEE Cement Industry Technical Conference,, 1992

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00687608.png)


Using frequency dependent electric space heating loads to manage frequency disturbances in power systems

A. Rautiainen; S. Repo; P. Jarventausta 2009 IEEE Bucharest PowerTech, 2009

In this paper the use of frequency dependent space heating loads to manage frequency disturbances in power systems is investigated. Setting values of space heater thermostats are made dependent of locally measured network frequency. Studies are carried out through time domain simulations. Studies imply that the use of frequency dependent loads in frequency disturbance management is an efficient tool for ...


Relating Chi to hybrid automata

B. van Beek; N. G. Jansen; K. E. Rooda; R. R. H. Schiffelers; K. L. Man; M. A. Reniers Proceedings of the 2003 Winter Simulation Conference, 2003., 2003

A hybrid automaton is one of the most popular formal models for hybrid system specification. The Chi language is a hybrid formalism for modeling, simulation and verification. It consists of a number of operators that operate on all process terms, including differential algebraic equations. This paper relates the two formalisms by means of a formal translation from a hybrid automaton ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Thermostats

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eLearning

Agents for distributed decision-making

S. Talukdar 2003 IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting (IEEE Cat. No.03CH37491), 2003

Agents are modules from which problem solving can be built. Structurally, an agent is a bundle of sensors, decision-makers and actuators; behaviorally, an agent is a mapping from an in-space (all the things the agent can sense) to an out-space (all things the agent can affect). Agents can be simple or compound. More specifically, lesser agents can be organized into ...


Challenges in utilisation of demand side response for operating reserve provision

Hassan W. Qazi; Daniel J. Burke; Damian Flynn IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies, Europe, 2014

Utilisation of flexible demand to provide contingency reserves is generally considered beneficial to power systems, and can be a key enabler for ambitious renewable energy penetrations. Detailed techno-economic analysis of reserve provision from flexible demand is considered in this paper. A unit commitment/economic dispatch problem is set up that recognises demand side response (DSR) as a source of primary operating ...


Low Voltage Motor Control Centers Utilizing Microprocessor Technology

D. G. Loucks IEEE Cement Industry Technical Conference,, 1992

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00687608.png)


Using frequency dependent electric space heating loads to manage frequency disturbances in power systems

A. Rautiainen; S. Repo; P. Jarventausta 2009 IEEE Bucharest PowerTech, 2009

In this paper the use of frequency dependent space heating loads to manage frequency disturbances in power systems is investigated. Setting values of space heater thermostats are made dependent of locally measured network frequency. Studies are carried out through time domain simulations. Studies imply that the use of frequency dependent loads in frequency disturbance management is an efficient tool for ...


Relating Chi to hybrid automata

B. van Beek; N. G. Jansen; K. E. Rooda; R. R. H. Schiffelers; K. L. Man; M. A. Reniers Proceedings of the 2003 Winter Simulation Conference, 2003., 2003

A hybrid automaton is one of the most popular formal models for hybrid system specification. The Chi language is a hybrid formalism for modeling, simulation and verification. It consists of a number of operators that operate on all process terms, including differential algebraic equations. This paper relates the two formalisms by means of a formal translation from a hybrid automaton ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Further Readings

    We turn on the lights in our house from a desk in an office miles away. Our refrigerator alerts us to buy milk on the way home. A package of cookies on the supermarket shelf suggests that we buy it, based on past purchases. The cookies themselves are on the shelf because of a "smart" supply chain. When we get home, the thermostat has already adjusted the temperature so that it's toasty or bracing, whichever we prefer. This is the Internet of Things -- a networked world of connected devices, objects, and people. In this book, Samuel Greengard offers a guided tour through this emerging world and how it will change the way we live and work. Greengard explains that the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its early stages. Smart phones, cloud computing, RFID (radio-frequency identification) technology, sensors, and miniaturization are converging to make possible a new generation of embedded and immersive technology. Greengard traces the origins of the IoT from the early days of ersonal computers and the Internet and examines how it creates the conceptual and practical framework for a connected world. He explores the industrial Internet and machine-to-machine communication, the basis for smart manufacturing and end-to-end supply chain visibility; the growing array of smart consumer devices and services -- from Fitbit fitness wristbands to mobile apps for banking; the practical and technical challenges of building the IoT; and the risks of a connected world, including a widening digital divide and threats to privacy and security. Finally, he considers the long-term impact of the IoT on society, narrating an eye-opening "Day in the Life" of IoT connections circa 2025.

  • The Environment Moves Front and Center

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Climate Change, a Game Changer

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • CSBD Thermostat Report

    No Abstract.

  • A “New Economic Policy”

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Index

    We turn on the lights in our house from a desk in an office miles away. Our refrigerator alerts us to buy milk on the way home. A package of cookies on the supermarket shelf suggests that we buy it, based on past purchases. The cookies themselves are on the shelf because of a "smart" supply chain. When we get home, the thermostat has already adjusted the temperature so that it's toasty or bracing, whichever we prefer. This is the Internet of Things -- a networked world of connected devices, objects, and people. In this book, Samuel Greengard offers a guided tour through this emerging world and how it will change the way we live and work. Greengard explains that the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its early stages. Smart phones, cloud computing, RFID (radio-frequency identification) technology, sensors, and miniaturization are converging to make possible a new generation of embedded and immersive technology. Greengard traces the origins of the IoT from the early days of ersonal computers and the Internet and examines how it creates the conceptual and practical framework for a connected world. He explores the industrial Internet and machine-to-machine communication, the basis for smart manufacturing and end-to-end supply chain visibility; the growing array of smart consumer devices and services -- from Fitbit fitness wristbands to mobile apps for banking; the practical and technical challenges of building the IoT; and the risks of a connected world, including a widening digital divide and threats to privacy and security. Finally, he considers the long-term impact of the IoT on society, narrating an eye-opening "Day in the Life" of IoT connections circa 2025.

  • The Quest for Alternatives and to Conserve

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • No More Nuclear

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Shock to Trance: The Power of Price

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Disaster in the Gulf

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.



Standards related to Thermostats

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