Conferences related to Thermostats

Back to Top

2013 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

SIEDS is a student focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and masters graduate design projects or design oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.

  • 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The Symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and Master's graduate design projects, such as those from capstone design courses or from baccalaureate, honors, or design-oriented graduate theses.

  • 2011 Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and masters graduate design projects or design-oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.

  • 2010 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS)

    SIEDS is a student-focused international forum for applied research, development, and design in Systems and Information Engineering. The symposium is the leading showcase for undergraduate and master's graduate design projects or design-oriented graduate theses. Faculty, industry, and government project advisors are welcome coauthors.


2012 47th International Universities Power Engineering Conference (UPEC)

A major international forum for the presentation, discussion and exchange of information concerning new trends in electrical power engineering. To become better informed about the latest developments in the field of power engineering.

  • 2010 45th International Universities Power Engineering Conference (UPEC)

    The global energy challenge, the ageing of electrical networks in industrial countries, and the extension of the grids in developing countries require significant research effort and the need for talented engineers and innovators is critical to the electrical energy industry. UPEC is an ideal forum to address such issues, and to network and meet experts in these areas


2011 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting

IEEE Power & Energy Annual Meeting --Papers --Awards --Plenary --Committee Meetings --Governing Board --Receptions --Tech tours --Tutorials --Companions Program


TRANSDUCERS 2011 - 2011 16th International Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Conference

Latest progress in physical, chemical and biological microsensors; Latest development in optical, RF, fluidic, biomedical and power MEMS; Most advanced technologies in micro/nano fabrication, packaging and design.


2010 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

The conference will cover all high frequency Ultrasound application including medical.


More Conferences

Periodicals related to Thermostats

Back to Top

Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

The development and application of electric systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; the encouragement of energy conservation; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices.




Xplore Articles related to Thermostats

Back to Top

A real time price based optimal scheduling mechanism for centralized air conditioning load

Monika Arora; Saurabh Chanana; Ashwani Kumar 2014 Eighteenth National Power Systems Conference (NPSC), 2014

This paper proposes a real time price based optimal scheduling mechanism for centralized air conditioning load. In residential context, air conditioners are the main reason for peak load in summers. The proposed mechanism aims to determine optimal operation of air conditioner such that it results in reduction in consumer's electricity bills. Mixed Integer Programming technique is used for obtaining optimal ...


The Steam Curing System Based on Fuzzy Self-tuning PID

Wang Bing; Ding Na; Zhou Jianhua 2013 Third International Conference on Intelligent System Design and Engineering Applications, 2013

In accordance with the requirements of concrete pole steam curing, this article puts forward a new series of PID control methods with fuzzy self- tuning, operated by S7-200PLC, to improve the quality of products, reduce steam consumption, achieve desirable robustness and potability.


Crowd-sourced BMS point matching and metadata maintenance with Babel

Jonathan Fürst; Kaifei Chen; Randy H. Katz; Philippe Bonnet 2016 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communication Workshops (PerCom Workshops), 2016

Cyber-physical applications, deployed on top of Building Management Systems (BMS), promise energy saving and comfort improvement in non-residential buildings. Such applications are so far mainly deployed as research prototypes. The main roadblock to widespread adoption is the low quality of BMS metadata. There is indeed a mismatch between (i) the anecdotal nature of metadata for legacy BMS - they are ...


An advanced engine thermal management system: nonlinear control and test

P. Setlur; J. R. Wagner; D. M. Dawson; E. Marotta IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 2005

Internal combustion engine thermal management system functionality can be enhanced through the introduction of smart thermostat valves and variable speed electric pumps and fans. The traditional automotive cooling system components include a wax based thermostat valve and crankshaft driven water pump. However, servo-motor driven valves, pumps, and fans can better regulate the engine's coolant fluid flow to realize fuel economy ...


A Thermal Biosensor Based on Enzyme Reaction

Yi-Hua Zheng; Tse-Chao Hua; Fei Xu 2005 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 27th Annual Conference, 2005

Application of the thermal biosensor as analytical tool is promising due to advantages as universal, simplicity and quick response. A novel thermal biosensor based on enzyme reaction has been developed. This biosensor is a flow injection analysis system and consists of two channels with enzyme reaction column and reference column. The reference column, which is set for eliminating the unspecific ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Thermostats

Back to Top

eLearning

A real time price based optimal scheduling mechanism for centralized air conditioning load

Monika Arora; Saurabh Chanana; Ashwani Kumar 2014 Eighteenth National Power Systems Conference (NPSC), 2014

This paper proposes a real time price based optimal scheduling mechanism for centralized air conditioning load. In residential context, air conditioners are the main reason for peak load in summers. The proposed mechanism aims to determine optimal operation of air conditioner such that it results in reduction in consumer's electricity bills. Mixed Integer Programming technique is used for obtaining optimal ...


The Steam Curing System Based on Fuzzy Self-tuning PID

Wang Bing; Ding Na; Zhou Jianhua 2013 Third International Conference on Intelligent System Design and Engineering Applications, 2013

In accordance with the requirements of concrete pole steam curing, this article puts forward a new series of PID control methods with fuzzy self- tuning, operated by S7-200PLC, to improve the quality of products, reduce steam consumption, achieve desirable robustness and potability.


Crowd-sourced BMS point matching and metadata maintenance with Babel

Jonathan Fürst; Kaifei Chen; Randy H. Katz; Philippe Bonnet 2016 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communication Workshops (PerCom Workshops), 2016

Cyber-physical applications, deployed on top of Building Management Systems (BMS), promise energy saving and comfort improvement in non-residential buildings. Such applications are so far mainly deployed as research prototypes. The main roadblock to widespread adoption is the low quality of BMS metadata. There is indeed a mismatch between (i) the anecdotal nature of metadata for legacy BMS - they are ...


An advanced engine thermal management system: nonlinear control and test

P. Setlur; J. R. Wagner; D. M. Dawson; E. Marotta IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 2005

Internal combustion engine thermal management system functionality can be enhanced through the introduction of smart thermostat valves and variable speed electric pumps and fans. The traditional automotive cooling system components include a wax based thermostat valve and crankshaft driven water pump. However, servo-motor driven valves, pumps, and fans can better regulate the engine's coolant fluid flow to realize fuel economy ...


A Thermal Biosensor Based on Enzyme Reaction

Yi-Hua Zheng; Tse-Chao Hua; Fei Xu 2005 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 27th Annual Conference, 2005

Application of the thermal biosensor as analytical tool is promising due to advantages as universal, simplicity and quick response. A novel thermal biosensor based on enzyme reaction has been developed. This biosensor is a flow injection analysis system and consists of two channels with enzyme reaction column and reference column. The reference column, which is set for eliminating the unspecific ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Thermostats"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • A “New Economic Policy”

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • The Invisible Hand? Regulation and the Rise of Cap and Trade

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Losing Control over Oil

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Government for the People? Congress and the Road to Reform

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Climate Change, a Game Changer

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • The Quest for Alternatives and to Conserve

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Reinforcement Learning and Animat Emotions

    Emotional states, such as happiness or sadness, pose particular problems for information processing theories of mind. Hedonic components of states, unlike cognitive components, lack representational content. Research within Artificial Life, in particular the investigation of adaptive agent architectures, provides insights into the dynamic relationship between motivation, the ability of control sub-states to gain access to limited processing resources, and prototype emotional states. Holland's learning classifier system provides a concrete example of this relationship, demonstrating simple 'emotion-like' states, much as a thermostat demonstrates simple 'belief-like' and 'desire-like' states.This leads to the conclusion that valency, a particular form of pleasure or displeasure, is a self- monitored process of credit-assignment. The importance of the movement of a domainindependent representation of utility within adaptive architectures is stressed. Existing information processing theories of emotion can be enriched by a 'circulation of value' design hypothesis. Implications for the development of emotional animats are considered.

  • Glossary

    We turn on the lights in our house from a desk in an office miles away. Our refrigerator alerts us to buy milk on the way home. A package of cookies on the supermarket shelf suggests that we buy it, based on past purchases. The cookies themselves are on the shelf because of a "smart" supply chain. When we get home, the thermostat has already adjusted the temperature so that it's toasty or bracing, whichever we prefer. This is the Internet of Things -- a networked world of connected devices, objects, and people. In this book, Samuel Greengard offers a guided tour through this emerging world and how it will change the way we live and work. Greengard explains that the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its early stages. Smart phones, cloud computing, RFID (radio-frequency identification) technology, sensors, and miniaturization are converging to make possible a new generation of embedded and immersive technology. Greengard traces the origins of the IoT from the early days of ersonal computers and the Internet and examines how it creates the conceptual and practical framework for a connected world. He explores the industrial Internet and machine-to-machine communication, the basis for smart manufacturing and end-to-end supply chain visibility; the growing array of smart consumer devices and services -- from Fitbit fitness wristbands to mobile apps for banking; the practical and technical challenges of building the IoT; and the risks of a connected world, including a widening digital divide and threats to privacy and security. Finally, he considers the long-term impact of the IoT on society, narrating an eye-opening "Day in the Life" of IoT connections circa 2025.

  • The Environment Moves Front and Center

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.

  • Disaster in the Gulf

    Americans take for granted that when we flip a switch the light will go on, when we turn up the thermostat the room will get warm, and when we pull up to the pump gas will be plentiful and relatively cheap. In The End of Energy, Michael Graetz shows us that we have been living an energy delusion for forty years. Until the 1970s, we produced domestically all the oil we needed to run our power plants, heat our homes, and fuel our cars. Since then, we have had to import most of the oil we use, much of it from the Middle East. And we rely on an even dirtier fuel--coal--to produce half of our electricity. Graetz describes more than forty years of energy policy incompetence--from the Nixon administration's fumbled response to the OPEC oil embargo through the failure to develop alternative energy sources to the current political standoff over "cap and trade"--and argues that we must make better decisions for our energy future. Rather than pushing policies that, over time, would produce the changes we need, presidents have swung for the fences, wasting billions seeking a technological "silver bullet" to solve all our problems. Congress has continually elevated narrow parochial interests over our national goals, directing huge subsidies and tax breaks to favored constituents and contributors. And, despite thousands of pages of energy legislation since the 1970s, Americans have never been asked to pay a price that reflects the real cost of the energy they consume. Until Americans face the facts about price, our energy incompetence will continue--and along with it the unraveling of our environment, security, and independence.



Standards related to Thermostats

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Thermostats"


Jobs related to Thermostats

Back to Top