Spinal cord injury

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A spinal cord injury (SCI) refers to any injury to the spinal cord that is caused by trauma instead of disease. Depending on where the spinal cord and nerve roots are damaged, the symptoms can vary widely, from pain to paralysis to incontinence. Spinal cord injuries are described at various levels of "incomplete", which can vary from having no effect on the patient to a "complete" injury which means a total loss of function. (Wikipedia.org)






Conferences related to Spinal cord injury

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2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC)

The 2020 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC 2020) will be held in Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), Toronto, Ontario, Canada. SMC 2020 is the flagship conference of the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. It provides an international forum for researchers and practitioners to report most recent innovations and developments, summarize state-of-the-art, and exchange ideas and advances in all aspects of systems science and engineering, human machine systems, and cybernetics. Advances in these fields have increasing importance in the creation of intelligent environments involving technologies interacting with humans to provide an enriching experience and thereby improve quality of life. Papers related to the conference theme are solicited, including theories, methodologies, and emerging applications. Contributions to theory and practice, including but not limited to the following technical areas, are invited.


2020 IEEE International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference (I2MTC)

The Conference focuses on all aspects of instrumentation and measurement science andtechnology research development and applications. The list of program topics includes but isnot limited to: Measurement Science & Education, Measurement Systems, Measurement DataAcquisition, Measurements of Physical Quantities, and Measurement Applications.


2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society (EMBC)

The conference program will consist of plenary lectures, symposia, workshops andinvitedsessions of the latest significant findings and developments in all the major fields ofbiomedical engineering.Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Accepted high quality paperswill be presented in oral and postersessions, will appear in the Conference Proceedings and willbe indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE & IEEE Xplore


2019 9th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

Neural Engineering

  • 2017 8th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural Engineering is an emerging core discipline,which coalesces neuroscience with engineering.Members of both the Neuroscience and Engineering Communities areencouraged to attend this highly multidisciplinarymeeting. The conference will highlight the emergingengineering innovations in the restoration andenhancement of impaired sensory, motor, andcognitive functions, novel engineering for deepeningknowledge of brain function, and advanced designand use of neurotechnologies

  • 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problemsassociated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, theelectrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, theanalysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi -scale from the single -cell and to the systemlevels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implantsand wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    Neural engineering deals with many aspects of basic and clinical problems associated with neural dysfunction including the representation of sensory and motor information, the electrical stimulation of the neuromuscular system to control the muscle activation and movement, the analysis and visualization of complex neural systems at multi-scale from the single-cell and to the system levels to understand the underlying mechanisms, the development of novel neural prostheses, implants and wearable devices to restore and enhance the impaired sensory and motor systems and functions.

  • 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2009 4th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)

    highlight the emerging field, Neural Engineering that unites engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science with molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience and encompasses such areas as replacing or restoring lost sensory and motor abilities, defining the organizing principles and underlying mechanisms of neural systems, neurorobotics, neuroelectronics, brain imaging and mapping, cognitive science and neuroscience.

  • 2007 3rd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2005 2nd International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

  • 2003 1st International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering


2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)

robotics, intelligent systems, automation, mechatronics, micro/nano technologies, AI,


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Periodicals related to Spinal cord injury

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Biomedical Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on

The Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems addresses areas at the crossroads of Circuits and Systems and Life Sciences. The main emphasis is on microelectronic issues in a wide range of applications found in life sciences, physical sciences and engineering. The primary goal of the journal is to bridge the unique scientific and technical activities of the Circuits and Systems ...


Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Broad coverage of concepts and methods of the physical and engineering sciences applied in biology and medicine, ranging from formalized mathematical theory through experimental science and technological development to practical clinical applications.


Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, IEEE/ACM Transactions on

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, sequence analysis, comparison and alignment methods; motif, gene and signal recognition; molecular evolution; phylogenetics and phylogenomics; determination or prediction of the structure of RNA and Protein in two and three dimensions; DNA twisting and folding; gene expression and gene regulatory networks; deduction of metabolic pathways; micro-array design and analysis; proteomics; ...


Computer

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed technical content that covers all aspects of computer science, computer engineering, technology, and applications. Computer is a resource that practitioners, researchers, and managers can rely on to provide timely information about current research developments, trends, best practices, and changes in the profession.


Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Serves as a compendium for papers on the technological advances in control engineering and as an archival publication which will bridge the gap between theory and practice. Papers will highlight the latest knowledge, exploratory developments, and practical applications in all aspects of the technology needed to implement control systems from analysis and design through simulation and hardware.


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Xplore Articles related to Spinal cord injury

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Monitoring Spinal Cord Compartment Pressures: Instrumentation And Preliminary Results

[1990] Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1990

None


Are paralyzed people really paralyzed? Probably not, according to EMG analysis

Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1988

Quantitative electromyographic analysis of 40 paralyzed muscles in ten spinal- cord-injured subjects was performed. The majority of muscles (32/40) demonstrated increased myoelectric activity but no observable gross muscle movement as a result of voluntary effort. Some subjects with paralysis retain miniature motor potentials. Increase in the magnitude of these potentials may explain the return of function seen by clinicians after ...


Controllability in humans: an exploratory study

Proceedings of the First Joint BMES/EMBS Conference. 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (Cat. N, 1999

Restoration of reduced or lost voluntary control after spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans is a key goal of SCI research. Objective methods to assess the degree of remaining motor control are lacking. This study proposes a motor task of alternating ankle movements, monitored by surface electromyography (sEMG) and movement sensors as a means of characterizing the limits of normal ...


6.7: Presentation session: Neuroanatomy, neuroregeneration, and modelings: “Spinal cord injuries (SCI) and Tennessee's contributions to the Americans for Disabilities Act”

2010 Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference, 2010

The Americans for Disabilities Act (ADA) arose from a need for access for disabled people for public and private facilities. The driving force behind providing access for handicapped individuals was initiated through the first White House Conference on Handicapped Individuals in 1975–6 throughout the United States. One of the most successful conferences was held in Nashville, TN in September 1976, ...


Investigating strategies to enhance axonal regeneration in the CNS

Proceedings of the First Joint BMES/EMBS Conference. 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (Cat. N, 1999

Spinal cord injury is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in loss of function below the site of injury. While spinal cord axons can regenerate in a permissive environment, such as the peripheral nerve, they show only limited, if any, regeneration in the CNS. The authors are investigating a synthetic conduit that mimics some of the ...


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Educational Resources on Spinal cord injury

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IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Monitoring Spinal Cord Compartment Pressures: Instrumentation And Preliminary Results

    None

  • Are paralyzed people really paralyzed? Probably not, according to EMG analysis

    Quantitative electromyographic analysis of 40 paralyzed muscles in ten spinal- cord-injured subjects was performed. The majority of muscles (32/40) demonstrated increased myoelectric activity but no observable gross muscle movement as a result of voluntary effort. Some subjects with paralysis retain miniature motor potentials. Increase in the magnitude of these potentials may explain the return of function seen by clinicians after spinal cord injury.<<ETX>>

  • Controllability in humans: an exploratory study

    Restoration of reduced or lost voluntary control after spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans is a key goal of SCI research. Objective methods to assess the degree of remaining motor control are lacking. This study proposes a motor task of alternating ankle movements, monitored by surface electromyography (sEMG) and movement sensors as a means of characterizing the limits of normal motor control. This paper presents normative results in ten healthy subjects for this voluntary motor task.

  • 6.7: Presentation session: Neuroanatomy, neuroregeneration, and modelings: “Spinal cord injuries (SCI) and Tennessee's contributions to the Americans for Disabilities Act”

    The Americans for Disabilities Act (ADA) arose from a need for access for disabled people for public and private facilities. The driving force behind providing access for handicapped individuals was initiated through the first White House Conference on Handicapped Individuals in 1975–6 throughout the United States. One of the most successful conferences was held in Nashville, TN in September 1976, where over 1200 handicapped individuals attended a three day conference highlighting the needs of all types of disabled people. The author was instrumental in bringing a number of these concerns to the attention of President Carter and the Department of Health and Human Services. In particular, Tennessee was exemplary in creating national building and access codes for spinal cord injured people that eventually brought these changes in access for all handicapped individuals in the US through the ADA. The author provides some unique experiences in how to create change in a climate of significant resistance within the Federal government.

  • Investigating strategies to enhance axonal regeneration in the CNS

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in loss of function below the site of injury. While spinal cord axons can regenerate in a permissive environment, such as the peripheral nerve, they show only limited, if any, regeneration in the CNS. The authors are investigating a synthetic conduit that mimics some of the attributes of the peripheral nerve while allowing the axons to penetrate beyond the conduit into the CNS. In particular, they are studying both contact-mediated and diffusible cues to promote regeneration. To mimic contact mediated cues, the authors are modifying surfaces with one or both of the cell adhesive peptides of laminin-YIGSR and IKVAV-and studying cellular response in vitro. To mimic the diffusible cues, the authors are studying the release and bioactivity of neurotrophic factors and the effects of a nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration gradient on axonal migration in vitro.

  • Microelectronic channel bridge and signal regeneration of injured spinal cords

    We are searching for a way to generate neural function recovery by introducing an implantable microelectronic system. Prototypes of the so-called microelectronic neural-bridging systems have been realized in the form of integrated circuits. The integrated circuits were realized in a standard CMOS process. In a series of animal experiments, we have demonstrated that an interrupted spinal cord could be bridged and neural signals were regenerated. The idea of microelectronics channel bridging and signal regeneration of injured spinal cords was primarily demonstrated.

  • Length, Tension And Tissue Pressure Relationships During Spinal Cord Distraction: An In-vitro Study

    None

  • Approaches for restoring elbow extension in tetraplegia: muscle tendon transfer and functional neuromuscular stimulation

    Tetraplegia resulting from cervical spinal cord injury typically leaves the muscles paralyzed, with the resulting loss extension function. Elbow extension is for many daily activities, important in the rehabilitation of the spinal cord injured individual. This paper compares the widely used surgical transfer of the posterior deltoid muscle, which restores voluntary control over elbow extension, to a technique based on functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) of the triceps muscles. Both methods were found to restore a modest level of elbow extension. The posterior deltoid transfer produced variable results and the resulting elbow extension moments were strongly dependent on shoulder position.

  • Using external anal sphincter activity to detect the onset of bladder contractions

    Individuals with spinal cord injury or neurological disorders may develop, involuntary bladder contraction at low volumes (bladder hyper-reflexia), which can lead to significant health problems. Current devices can eliminate nascent contractions through continuous stimulation, but do not have a means to detect the onset of bladder contraction to stimulate conditionally. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between the activity of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and hyper-reflexive bladder contraction, and to use the relationship to develop a model to detect the onset of a bladder contraction. Bladder pressure and EAS EMG were recorded in four intact male cats. There was little EAS activity during the bladder contraction and more activity between contractions (p<0.001). A model was developed to predict the onset of a bladder contraction using the EAS EMG activity. The model calculated the onset of bladder contraction on average 4.8 seconds after the contraction started with an average increase in pressure of 8.7 cmH/sub 2/O. There existed a phasic relationship between the bladder and the EAS, which enabled the prediction model to detect the onset of a bladder contraction. The EAS EMG can be used as a trigger to deliver conditional inhibitory stimulation of the bladder.

  • Modulation of spastic ankle stiffness dynamics with voluntary contraction in spinal cord injury

    A parallel-cascade system identification technique was used to examine the intrinsic and reflex contributions to overall ankle stiffness in normal (control) and spastic spinal cord injured (SCI) subjects as a function of voluntary contraction level. Intrinsic dynamics were modeled as a linear, 2nd- order system relating intrinsic torque to joint position. Reflex dynamics were described by a linear, 3rd-order system relating half-wave rectified velocity and reflex-torque. Intrinsic stiffness was similar in magnitude in both groups and increased with voluntary contraction at similar rates. In contrast, reflex stiffness dynamics behaved differently in the two groups: (1) reflex stiffness gain was significantly greater in SCI than control subjects at all contraction levels, (2) the modulation of reflex gain with voluntary contraction was abnormal, and (3) the reflex frequency parameter was lower in SCIs and decreased with contraction level while it increased in controls. These differences were significant across a wide range of contraction levels with the gain difference being largest at low levels of contraction and the frequency difference being largest at high levels of contraction.



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