Conferences related to Sea surface

Back to Top

OCEANS 2016

The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 500 technical papers and 150 -200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2015 - MTS/IEEE Washington

    The Marine Technology Scociety and the Oceanic Engineering Society of the IEEE cosponor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science, engineering, and policy. The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2014

    The OCEANS conference covers four days. One day for tutorials and three for approx. 450 technical papers and 150-200 exhibits.

  • OCEANS 2013

    Three days of 8-10 tracks of technical sessions (400-450 papers) and concurent exhibition (150-250 exhibitors)

  • OCEANS 2012

    Ocean related technology. Tutorials and three days of technical sessions and exhibits. 8-12 parallel technical tracks.

  • OCEANS 2011

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.

  • OCEANS 2010

    The Marine Technology Society and the Oceanic Engineering Scociety of the IEEE cosponsor a joint annual conference and exposition on ocean science engineering, and policy.


IGARSS 2015 - 2015 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

The Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields using conferences, education and other resources. Its fields of interest are the theory, concepts and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the remote sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space, as well as the processing, interpretation and dissemination of this information.

  • IGARSS 2014 - 2014 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    GRSS seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields. IGARSS begins with a plenary session and tutorials on the most up-to-date topics. Paper, panel and poster sessions will be scheduled. The exhibit hall features the latest in geoscience instruments, equipment, software, publications, and scientific programs.

  • IGARSS 2013 - 2013 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    GRSS seeks to advance science and technology in geoscience, remote sensing and related fields. IGARSS begins with a plenary session and tutorials on the most up-to-date topics. Paper, panel and poster sessions will be scheduled. The exhibit hall features the latest in geoscience instruments, equipment, software, publications, and scientific programs.

  • IGARSS 2012 - 2012 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    Remote Sensing Techniques and Applications.

  • IGARSS 2011 - 2011 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    To gather world-class scientists, engineers and educators engaged in the fields of geoscience and remote sensing to meet and present their latest activities. Nearly 1900 participants from all over the world attended technical sessions, tutorials, exhibits and social activities at the 2010 event in Hawaii.

  • IGARSS 2010 - 2010 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    Remote Sensing techniques and applications

  • IGARSS 2009 - 2009 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

    The programme for Cape Town will have several special sessions, in addition to maintaining continuity of traditional GRSS themes. IGARSS 2009 will celebrate ten years of MODIS Earth observations, and five years of the GEOSS programme. On the technical side, special sessions on microsatellites will be organized. In terms of African development, several sessions on applications will address disaster preparedness and response, global change and adaptation, good governance and role of RS in health.

  • IGARSS 2008 - 2008 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium



Periodicals related to Sea surface

Back to Top

Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

Experimental and theoretical advances in antennas including design and development, and in the propagation of electromagnetic waves including scattering, diffraction and interaction with continuous media; and applications pertinent to antennas and propagation, such as remote sensing, applied optics, and millimeter and submillimeter wave techniques.


Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on

Theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as applied to sensing the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space; and the processing, interpretation, and dissemination of this information.


Oceanic Engineering, IEEE Journal of

Bayes procedures; buried-object detection; dielectric measurements; Doppler measurements; geomagnetism; sea floor; sea ice; sea measurements; sea surface electromagnetic scattering; seismology; sonar; acoustic tomography; underwater acoustics; and underwater radio communication.



Most published Xplore authors for Sea surface

Back to Top

Xplore Articles related to Sea surface

Back to Top

Electromagnetic surface waves: New formulas and applications

R. King 1984 Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium, 1984

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/01149286.png)


Recovery Of An Advanced Unnanned Search System By The Advanced Thethered Vehicle

M. E. Neller; R. A. Bixler OCEANS 91 Proceedings, 1991

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00613927.png)


Radar observation of ocean wave slope spectra

J. Eckerman; D. Hammond 1974 Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium, 1974

Sensors for remote sensing of ocean wave directional spectra are needed for global wave forecasting application. Backscatter from off-nadir, short pulse, radar-illuminated ocean waves gives the wave impulse response. Wave slope and wave length can be determined from the applitude time radar signature. Analysis of some preliminary wave spectral data taken with a 10 nanosecond aircraft mounted radar will be ...


Air-Sea Interacting Effects On The Sea Surface Temperature Estimation

S. Tanba; R. Yokoyama Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 1991. IGARSS '91. Remote Sensing: Global Monitoring for Earth Management., International, 1991

First Page of the Article ![](/xploreAssets/images/absImages/00577700.png)


Estimation of ocean wave spectra using two-antenna SAR systems

D. R. Lyzenga; J. R. Bennett IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 1991

Data from synthetic aperture radar, (SAR) systems can be used to estimate ocean wave directional spectra, but the method is limited by nonlinearities associated with the velocity bunching mechanism and the azimuth falloff effect, which reduces the range of azimuth wavelengths that can be observed. A theoretical analysis which suggests that the use of two or more receive antennas, spaced ...


More Xplore Articles

Educational Resources on Sea surface

Back to Top

eLearning

Artificial neural network-based inversion technique for extracting ocean surface wave spectra from SAR images

Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 1997. IGARSS '97. Remote Sensing - A Scientific Vision for Sustainable Development., 1997 IEEE International, 1997

An artificial neural network (ANN) based nonlinear technique for inverting the SAR image spectrum of ocean surface waves is developed. In this technique, a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) is used to perform the inversion process. The MLP is trained using simulated SAR and wave spectra. The training process utilizes the standard error-backpropagation technique. The results indicate that the method works well ...


Tactical oceanography in mine countermeasures

OCEANS '02 MTS/IEEE, 2002

A successful power projection campaign may require operations through littoral defenses, including mines. Mines are the most prolific weapons available to other nations intent on inhibiting US Naval forces' ability to project power from the sea. Therefore, mine countermeasures (MCM) is integral to the overall power projection campaign. Countering the mine threat is critical to naval forces ability to effectively ...


Monitoring of the transmission properties of the rotor slip ring system of doubly-fed induction generators

Electric Machines and Drives, 2005 IEEE International Conference on, 2005

A diagnostic strategy for the monitoring of the transmission properties and sparking of doubly-fed induction generators with slip rings is introduced in this paper. Modifications in the transmission properties can be recognized by measurement and evaluation of the rotor currents without additional sensors. The existing current transformers in the system can be used for the diagnostic


Modeling of meteorologically forced currents on the Scotian Shelf

OCEANS '87, 1987

The application of a 2-1/2D model for simulation of the ocean currents on the Scotian Shelf is described. A 1-D finite element model of the time-dependent buoyancy and current profiles which uses a steady-state turbulence energy closure scheme is coupled internally through the depth integrated current and bottom stress with a 2-D barotropic model. Hourly surface fluxes of momentum and ...


Behavior Subtraction applied to radar

Radar Conference (Radar), 2014 International, 2014

An algorithm developed for optical images has been applied to radar data. The algorithm, Behavior Subtraction, is based on capturing the dynamics of a scene and detecting anomalous behavior. The radar application is the detection of small surface targets at sea. The sea surface yields the expected stable background dynamics, while a surface target will change the local dynamics due ...


More eLearning Resources

IEEE.tv Videos

No IEEE.tv Videos are currently tagged "Sea surface"

IEEE-USA E-Books

  • Abbreviations

    More than half the globe is covered by visible clouds. Clouds control major parts of the Earth's energy balance, influencing both incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave thermal radiation. Latent heating and cooling related to cloud processes modify atmospheric circulation, and, by modulating sea surface temperatures, clouds affect the oceanic circulation. Clouds are also an essential component of the global water cycle, on which all terrestrial life depends. Yet clouds constitute the most poorly quantified, least understood, and most puzzling aspect of atmospheric science, and thus the largest source of uncertainty in the prediction of climate change. Because clouds are influenced by climate change, and because complex, unidentified feedback systems are involved, science is faced with many unanswered questions. This volume begins by indentifying and describing the baffling nature of clouds. It explores the boundaries of current knowledge on the spatial/temporal variability of clouds and cloud-related aerosols as well as the factors that control clouds, and examines the extent and nature of anthropogenic perturbations. Particular emphasis is given to the connections of clouds to climate through radiation, dynamics, precipitation, and chemistry, and to the difficulties in understanding the obvious but elusive fact that clouds must be affected by climate change. Utilizing the insights of this unique gathering of experts, the book offers recommendations to improve the current state of knowledge and direct future research in fields ranging from chemistry and theoretical physics to climate modeling and remote satellite sensing.

  • Subject Index

    More than half the globe is covered by visible clouds. Clouds control major parts of the Earth's energy balance, influencing both incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave thermal radiation. Latent heating and cooling related to cloud processes modify atmospheric circulation, and, by modulating sea surface temperatures, clouds affect the oceanic circulation. Clouds are also an essential component of the global water cycle, on which all terrestrial life depends. Yet clouds constitute the most poorly quantified, least understood, and most puzzling aspect of atmospheric science, and thus the largest source of uncertainty in the prediction of climate change. Because clouds are influenced by climate change, and because complex, unidentified feedback systems are involved, science is faced with many unanswered questions. This volume begins by indentifying and describing the baffling nature of clouds. It explores the boundaries of current knowledge on the spatial/temporal variability of clouds and cloud-related aerosols as well as the factors that control clouds, and examines the extent and nature of anthropogenic perturbations. Particular emphasis is given to the connections of clouds to climate through radiation, dynamics, precipitation, and chemistry, and to the difficulties in understanding the obvious but elusive fact that clouds must be affected by climate change. Utilizing the insights of this unique gathering of experts, the book offers recommendations to improve the current state of knowledge and direct future research in fields ranging from chemistry and theoretical physics to climate modeling and remote satellite sensing.

  • Global Indirect Radiative Forcing Caused by Aerosols: IPCC (2007) and Beyond

    Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a significant indirect radiative forcing because they act as cloud condensation nuclei in warm cloud-forming processes and ice nuclei in cold cloud-forming processes. Although many of the processes associated with the perturbation of cloud microphysics by anthropogenic aerosols were discussed, IPCC (2007) provided only an estimate of full quantification of the radiative forcing attributable to the first indirect effect (which they referred to as the cloud albedo effect). Here we explain that this approach is necessary if one is to compare the radiative forcing from the indirect effect of aerosols with those from other radiative forcing components such as that from changes in well-mixed greenhouse gases. We also highlight the problems in assessing the effect of anthropogenic aerosols upon clouds under the strict definitions of radiative forcing provided by the IPCC (2007). Although results from global climate models, at their current state of development, suggest that an analysis of indirect aerosol effects in terms of forcing and feedback is possible, a key rationale for the IPCC's definition of radiative forcing, a straightforward scaling between an agent's forcing and the temperature change it induces, is significantly compromised. Feedbacks from other radiative forcings are responses to radiative perturbations, whereas feedbacks from indirect aerosol effects are responses to both radiative and cloud microphysical perturbations. This inherent difference in forcing mechanism breaks down the consistency between forcing and temperature response. It is likely that additional characterization, such as climate efficacy, will be required when comparing indirect aerosol effects with other radiative forcings. We suggest using the radiative flux perturbation associated with a change from preindustrial to present-day co mposition, calculated in a global climate model using fixed sea surface temperature and sea ice, as a supplement to IPCC forcing

  • Name Index

    More than half the globe is covered by visible clouds. Clouds control major parts of the Earth's energy balance, influencing both incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave thermal radiation. Latent heating and cooling related to cloud processes modify atmospheric circulation, and, by modulating sea surface temperatures, clouds affect the oceanic circulation. Clouds are also an essential component of the global water cycle, on which all terrestrial life depends. Yet clouds constitute the most poorly quantified, least understood, and most puzzling aspect of atmospheric science, and thus the largest source of uncertainty in the prediction of climate change. Because clouds are influenced by climate change, and because complex, unidentified feedback systems are involved, science is faced with many unanswered questions. This volume begins by indentifying and describing the baffling nature of clouds. It explores the boundaries of current knowledge on the spatial/temporal variability of clouds and cloud-related aerosols as well as the factors that control clouds, and examines the extent and nature of anthropogenic perturbations. Particular emphasis is given to the connections of clouds to climate through radiation, dynamics, precipitation, and chemistry, and to the difficulties in understanding the obvious but elusive fact that clouds must be affected by climate change. Utilizing the insights of this unique gathering of experts, the book offers recommendations to improve the current state of knowledge and direct future research in fields ranging from chemistry and theoretical physics to climate modeling and remote satellite sensing.

  • Efficient computation of the Bayesian CramerRao Bound on Estimating Parameters of Markov Models

    This paper presents a novel method for calculating the Hybrid Cramer-Rao lower bound (HCRLB) when the statistical model for the data has a Markovian nature. The method applies to both the non-linear/non-Gaussian as well as linear/Gaussian model. The approach solves the required expectation over unknown random parameters by several one-dimensional integrals computed recursively, thus simplifying a computationally-intensive multi-dimensional integration. The method is applied to the problem of refractivity estimation using radar clutter from the sea surface, where the backscatter cross section is assumed to be a Markov process in range. The HCRLB is evaluated and compared to the performance of the corresponding maximum a-posteriori estimator. Simulation results indicate that the HCRLB provides a tight lower bound in this application.



Standards related to Sea surface

Back to Top

No standards are currently tagged "Sea surface"


Jobs related to Sea surface

Back to Top